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AIRCRAFT MAINTENANCE PowerPoint Presentation
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AIRCRAFT MAINTENANCE

AIRCRAFT MAINTENANCE

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AIRCRAFT MAINTENANCE

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  1. AIRCRAFT MAINTENANCE Regulations & Requirements for Aircraft Maintenance

  2. AVIATION LAWS

  3. ICAO Annexes • FAA Regulations (FAR) • EASA Regulations (JAA Joint Aviation Authorities -JAR) • Thai DCA Law & Regulations • NAA National Aviation Authority - CASA Regulations (Australia) - CAA Civil Aviation Authority (UK) • IOSA Requirements Topic

  4. ICAO Annexes • FAA Regulations (FAR) • EASA Regulations (JAA Joint Aviation Authorities -JAR) • Thai DCA Law & Regulations • NAA National Aviation Authority - CASA Regulations (Australia) - CAA Civil Aviation Authority (UK) • IOSA Requirements Authority

  5. ICAOInternational Civil Aviation Organisationองค์การการบินพลเรือนระหว่างประเทศ • The constitution of ICAO is the Convention on International Civil Aviation, drawn up by a conference in Chicago in November and December 1944, and to which each ICAO Contracting State is a party. • Additional sections to the ICAO Convention, which are guidelines provided for the various national aviation authorities for use in developing the civil aviation rules and regulations that govern flight operations in their respective states.

  6. ICAOInternational Civil Aviation Organisation ICAO is responsible for: - Safety - Registration - Airworthiness - Prevention of economic waste - Fair competition - Standardisation - Aviation Law Its headquarters are located in the Quartier International of Montreal, Quebec Canada.

  7. ICAO Annexes

  8. ICAO Annexes • ICAO SARPS (Standards and Recommended Practices) for each area of ICAO responsibility are contained in 18 Annexes. • Annex 1 - Personnel Licensing • Annex 2 - Rules of the Air • Annex 3 - Meteorological Services • Annex 4 - Aeronautical Charts • Annex 5 - Units of Measurement • Annex 6 - Operation of Aircraft • Annex 7 - Aircraft Nationality and Registration Marks • Annex 8 - Airworthiness of Aircraft • Annex 9 - Facilitation • Annex 10 - Aeronautical Telecommunications • Annex 11 - Air Traffic Services • Annex 12 - Search and Rescue • Annex 13 - Aircraft Accident and Incident Investigation • Annex 14 - Aerodromes • Annex 15 - Aeronautical Information Services • Annex 16 - Environmental Protection • Annex 17 - Security • Annex 18 - The Safe Transportation of Dangerous Goods by Air

  9. ICAO Code • ICAO uses 4-letter airport codes • ICAO uses 3 or 4 letter aircraft type codes • ICAO uses 3-letter provides telephony designators to aircraft • ICAO Aircraft Registration Prefixes

  10. ICAO Code • ICAO uses 4-letter airport codes; designating each airport around the world. Example: VTBS = Suvarnabhumi Airport (BKK), Samutprakan, Thailand WSSS = Signgapore Changi Airport, Changi,Singapore VVNB= Noi bai International Airport (HAN) Hanoi, Veitnam EGLL = London Heathrow Airport (LHR) London, England

  11. ICAO Code • ICAO uses 3 or 4 letter aircraft type codes; These codes provide the identification that is typically used in flight plans. Example: Boeing 747 that would use B741, B742 ,B743 • ICAO uses 3-letter provides telephony designators to aircraft operators worldwide. Example: Japan Airlines International is JAL and Japan Air 111 (JAL111) Thai Airways International is THA and Thai Air 112 (THA112)

  12. ICAO Code • ICAO Aircraft Registration Prefixes are used to identify the place where the aircraft registers; Example: D : Germany, D-AILS B : China, B-5678 N : USA, N1234 9V : Singapore, 9V-DEF HS : Thailand, HS-ABC G : United Kingdom, G-XYZ • Similarly most airlines employ a distinctive and internationally recognized call sign that is normally spoken during radio transmissions as a prefix to the flight number. (Charter, Private and etc.) • Some call-signs are less obviously associated with a particular airline than others. This might be for historic reasons, or possibly to avoid confusion with a call sign used by an established airline.

  13. FAA Federal Aviation Administration • The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) is • the national aviation authority of the United States. • An agency of the United States Department of Transportation, it has authority to regulate and oversee all aspects of civil aviation in the U.S. • The Federal Aviation Act of 1958 created the organization under the name "Federal Aviation Agency", and adopted its current name in 1966 when it became a part of the United States Department of Transportation.

  14. FAA Federal Aviation Administration • Regions and Aeronautical Center Operations • Headquartersin Washington, DC • Technical Center in Atlantic City • Aeronautical Centerin Oklahoma City. • The nine regions are; 1. Alaskan– Anchorage, Alaska 2. Northwest Mountain – Renton, WA 3. Western Pacific – Hawthorne, CA 4. Southwest – Fort Worth, TX 5. Central – Kansas City, MO 6. Great Lakes – Chicago, IL 7. Southern – Atlanta, GA 8. Eastern – New York City 9. New England – Burlington, MA

  15. FAA Federal Aviation Administration The FAA's major roles include: • Regulating U.S. commercial space transportation • Regulating air navigation facilities' geometry and flight inspection standards • Encouraging and developing civil aeronautics, including new aviation technology • Issuing, suspending, or revoking pilot certificates • Regulating civil aviation to promote safety, especially through local offices called Flight Standards District Offices • Developing and operating a system of air traffic control and navigation for both civil and military aircraft • Researching and developing the National Airspace System and civil aeronautics • Developing and carrying out programs to control aircraft noise and other environmental effects of civil aviation

  16. FAA Federal Aviation Administration Title 14 of the Code of Federal Regulations This database is a repository of certain Code of Federal Regulations (CFRs) and Special Federal Aviation Regulations (SFARs) from 14 CFR in their current version as well as historical versions. The CFR includes the active document as a result of the most recent amendment. When looking at the historical CFRs and SFARs, the checkmark indicates the CFR Part section or SFAR Part that is most current.

  17. FAA Federal Aviation Administration Code of federal regulations (CFR) • Title 1: General Provisions Title 2: Grants and Agreements • Title 3: The President Title 4: Accounts • Title 5: Administrative Personnel Title 6: Homeland Security • Title 7: Agriculture Title 8: Aliens and Nationality • Title 9: Animals and Animal Products Title 10: Energy • Title 11: Federal Elections Title 12: Banks and Banking • Title 13: Business Credit and Assistance • Title 14: Aeronautics and Space (also known as the Federal Aviation Regulations, administered by the Federal Aviation Administration) • Title 15: Commerce and Foreign Trade……….Title 50: Wildlife and Fisheries Example; 14 CFR Part 21 14 CFR Part 39

  18. FARs Federal Aviation Regulations DEFINITIONS • Part 1 - Definitions and abbreviations PROCEDURAL RULES • Part 11 - General rulemaking procedures • Part 13 - Investigative and enforcement procedures • Part 14 - Rules implementing the Equal Access to Justice Act of 1980 • Part 15 - Administrative claims under Federal Tort Claims Act • Part 16 - Rules of practice for Federally-assisted airport enforcement proceedings • Part 17 - Procedures for protests and contracts disput

  19. FARs Federal Aviation Regulations AIRCRAFT • Part 21 - Certification procedures for products and parts • Part 23 - Airworthiness standards: Normal, utility, acrobatic, and commuter category airplanes • Part 25 - Airworthiness standards: Transport category airplanes • Part 27 - Airworthiness standards: Normal category rotorcraft • Part 29 - Airworthiness standards: Transport category rotorcraft • Part 31 - Airworthiness standards: Manned free balloons • Part 33 - Airworthiness standards: Aircraft engines • Part 34 - Fuel venting and exhaust emission requirements for turbine engine powered airplanes

  20. FARs Federal Aviation Regulations AIRCRAFT • Part 35 - Airworthiness standards: Propellers • Part 36 - Noise standards: Aircraft type and airworthiness certification • Part 39 - Airworthiness directives • Part 43 - Maintenance, preventive maintenance, rebuilding, and alteration • Part 45 - Identification and registration marking • Part 47 - Aircraft registration • Part 49 - Recording of aircraft titles and security documents

  21. FARs Federal Aviation Regulations AIRMEN • Part 61 - Certification: Pilots, flight instructors, and ground instructors • Part 63 - Certification: Flight crewmembers other than pilots • Part 65 - Certification: Airmen other than flight crewmembers • Part 67 - Medical standards and certification

  22. FARs Federal Aviation Regulations AIRSPACE • Part 71 - Designation of class A, class B, class C, class D, and class E airspace areas; airways; routes; and reporting points • Part 73 - Special use airspace • Part 77 - Objects affecting navigable airspace

  23. FARs Federal Aviation Regulations AIR TRAFFIC AND GENERAL OPERATING RULES • Part 91 - General operating and flight rules • Part 93 - Special air traffic rules and airport traffic patterns • Part 95 - IFR altitudes • Part 97 - Standard instrument approach procedures • Part 99 - Security control of air traffic • Part 101 - Moored balloons, kites, unmanned rockets and unmanned free balloons • Part 103 - Ultralight vehicles • Part 105 - Parachute Operations • Part 107 - Airport security • Part 108 - Aircraft operator security • Part 109 - Indirect air carrier security

  24. FARs Federal Aviation Regulations AIR CARRIERS, AIR TRAVEL CLUBS, AND OPERATORS FOR COMPENSATION OR HIRE: CERTIFICATION AND OPERATIONS • Part 119 - Certification: Air carriers and commercial operators • Part 121 - Operating requirements: Domestic, flag, and supplemental operations • Part 125 - Certification and operations: Airplanes having a seating capacity of 20 or more passengers or a maximum payload capacity of 6,000 pounds or more; and rules governing persons on board such aircraft • Part 129 - Operations: Foreign air carriers and foreign operators of U.S.-registered aircraft engaged in common carriage

  25. FARs Federal Aviation Regulations AIR CARRIERS, AIR TRAVEL CLUBS, AND OPERATORS FOR COMPENSATION OR HIRE: CERTIFICATION AND OPERATIONS • Part 133 - Rotorcraft external-load operations • Part 135 - Operating requirements: Commuter and on demand operations and rules governing persons on board such aircraft • Part 137 - Agricultural aircraft operations • Part 139 - Certification and operations: Land airports serving certain air carriers

  26. FARs Federal Aviation Regulations SCHOOLS AND OTHER CERTIFICATED AGENCIES • Part 141 - Pilot schools • Part 142 - Training centers • Part 145 – Repair Station Certificate • Part 147 – Aviation Maintenance Technicians Schools • Part 183 – Representatives of The Administrator

  27. Subpart FAR 145 - sample Federal Aviation Regulation Part 145, or FAR 145 The regulation is broken into five subparts: • Subpart A - General • Subpart B - Certification • Subpart C - Housing, Facilities, Equipment, Materials, and Data • Subpart D - Personnel • Subpart E - Operating Rules

  28. FAA AD’s 14 CFR Part 39 – Airworthiness Directives

  29. Licence • Part 61 - Certification: Pilots, flight instructors, and ground instructors • Part 63 - Certification: Flight crewmembers other than pilots • Part 65 - Certification: Airmen other than flight crewmembers

  30. Air Carrier Certificate (ACC/AOC)

  31. C of A 14 CFR Part 21 - Certification procedures for products and parts

  32. Export C of A 14 CFR Part 21 - Certification procedures for products and parts

  33. Authorized Release Certificate (FAA8130-3)

  34. C of R

  35. Air Agency Certificate

  36. TC & TCDS

  37. STC

  38. FAA Form 337

  39. JAA Joint Aviation Authorities • The Joint Aviation Authorities, or JAA, was an associated body of the ECAC representing the civil aviation regulatory authorities of a number of European States who had agreed to co-operate in developing and implementing common safety regulatory standards and procedures. • The JAA started in 1970. Originally, its objectives were only to produce common certification codes for large aeroplanes and for engines in order to meet the needs of European industry and international consortia (e.g., Airbus). • After 1987 its work was extended to operations, maintenance, licensing and certification/design standards for all classes of aircraft

  40. European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) • The European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) is • an agency of the European Union (EU) which has • been given regulatory and executive tasks in the • field of civilian aviation safety. • It was created on 15 July 2002,and it reached full • functionality in 2008, taking over functions of the • JAA (Joint Aviation Authorities).

  41. European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) • The agency’s responsibilities include: - giving advice to the European Union for drafting new legislation; - implementing and monitoring safety rules, including inspections in the Member States; - type-certification of aircraft and components, as well as the approval of organisations involved in the design, manufacture and maintenance of aeronautical products; - authorization of third-country (non EU) operators; - safety analysis and research.

  42. European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) • European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) is an agency of the European Union (EU) with offices in Cologne, Germany . • www.easa.europa.eu/

  43. EASA Organisation structure

  44. European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) • EASA Regulations - Part-66 Certifying Staff - Part-145 Maintenance Organisation Approval - EASA Part-M Continuing Airworthiness - EASA Part-147 Training Organisation Requirements - EASA Part-21 Subpart J Design Organisation - EASA Part-21 Subpart G Production Organisation

  45. European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) • Part-66 Certifying Staff Category A - permits the holder to certify scheduled line maintenance and simple defect rectification. - Category B1 permits the holder to certify maintenance work carried out on aircraft structure, powerplant, mechanical and electrical systems. Category B2 permits the holder to certify maintenance work carried out on avionic and electrical systems.

  46. European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) • Part-145 Maintenance Organisation Approval - To obtain approval to be an aeronautical repair station, an organisation must write, submit and keep updated a 'Maintenance Organisation Exposition (MOE). - To support their MOE they must have a documented set of procedures. • Part-147 Training Organisation Requirements - To go with Part-66 on the issuing of licenses is the larger area of setting up and gaining approval for a training school.

  47. European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) • Part-M Continuing Airworthiness - EASA Part-M consists of several subparts. - Subparts are F (Maintenance for aircraft below 5700 kg in non commercial environment), - Subparts G (Continuing Airworthiness Management Organization = CAMO, coordinating the compliance of aircraft with maintenance program, airworthiness directives and service bulletins)

  48. EASA-AD’s

  49. AD’s

  50. TC & STC