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Georgia High School Graduation Coach Training Atlanta Airport Westin Hotel August 8-10, 2006 PowerPoint Presentation
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Georgia High School Graduation Coach Training Atlanta Airport Westin Hotel August 8-10, 2006

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  1. Georgia High School Graduation Coach Training Atlanta Airport Westin Hotel August 8-10, 2006 Georgia Department of Education August, 2006 All Rights Reserved

  2. Building While Flying! You can download this video at http://www.jengajam.com/r/EDS-Airplane-Advert Georgia Department of Education August, 2006 All Rights Reserved

  3. Why Change ? • Committee of Ten's Recommendations, 1892 -1893 • They determined that the goal of high school was to prepare all students, who attended, to do well in life, contribute to their own well-being and society's good, and to prepare some students for college (at the time only four percent of the high school graduates were attending college and it was determined that in order to be an industrial world power we needed between 15 to 20% of our population to become college graduates). Georgia Department of Education August, 2006 All Rights Reserved

  4. Why Change? • Amazingly, today, slightly over 20% of our population in the United States has a four year college degree! • However, while that is the current condition of our aging population, the younger generations are producing fewer college graduates in a time when America needs a MORE educated population in order to compete globally in the information/digital age... Georgia Department of Education August, 2006 All Rights Reserved

  5. WHY CHANGE? China’s plan today is to educate 15-20% of their population...they have 1.3 billion people, therefore, they will have more college graduates than we have people in the United States! • And what about India, Singapore, Pakistan, South Korea… Georgia Department of Education August, 2006 All Rights Reserved

  6. Why Change? • Today more than 1,000 U.S. companies outsource their business processes and technology maintenance needs to India. • IBM calculates a computer programmer’s wage as $156.00 per hour in the US. In India the same programmer makes $12.50. • IBM sent 15,000 jobs (10,000 of which were newly created) to India in 2004. Georgia Department of Education August, 2006 All Rights Reserved

  7. Why Change? • The U.S. has lost 3 million manufacturing jobs in the last three years. WHY? • The average manufacturing wage in China today is .61 per hour. The average wage in the US is $16.00 per hour. Georgia Department of Education August, 2006 All Rights Reserved

  8. Why Change? BIG Box Mart You can download this video athttp://www.jibjab.com/JokeBox/JokeBox_JJOrig.aspx?movieid=122 Georgia Department of Education August, 2006 All Rights Reserved

  9. WHY CHANGE? • According to the Center for Educational Statistics, approximately 488,000 students drop-out of American high schools in 2005… • Approximately 24,000 were from GEORGIA • How many were from your school… • 20? 30? 40? More? Georgia Department of Education August, 2006 All Rights Reserved

  10. WHY CHANGE? Why are they dropping out? • Take a minute and share your thoughts about this with the person sitting next to you then listen to their thoughts for one minute… Georgia Department of Education August, 2006 All Rights Reserved

  11. WHY CHANGE? GEORGIA • 9th Grade Statewide Enrollment for 2001/2002 was 142,079 • 12th Grade Statewide Enrollment for 2004/2005 was 83,872 • A difference of 58,207 students which translates into a cohort reduction of 41% Georgia Department of Education August, 2006 All Rights Reserved

  12. Fall 2004-2005 Enrollment Georgia Department of Education August, 2006 All Rights Reserved

  13. WHY CHANGE? • U.S. Department of Education Averaged Freshman Graduation Rate (AFGR ) • Cohort Graduation Rate • Education Week’s Formula – the Cumulative Promotion Index Georgia Department of Education August, 2006 All Rights Reserved

  14. WHY CHANGE? A Key to NCLB Graduation Rate Formulas Leaver Rate – Percent of students leaving high school with a standard high school diploma, expressed as a proportion of all those documented leaving with a diploma or other completion credential or as a dropout. This method is sometimes referred to as a departure-classification index. (33 states) Cohort Rate – Percent of students from an entering 9th grade cohort who graduate with a standard diploma within four years. Method can account for transfers and students retained in grade. Student data may be tracked on a statewide or local basis. (10 states) Persistence Rate – Percent of students who remain in school from grade 9 through grade 12. Rate is calculated using information on (1) the percent of students not dropping out at specific grade levels or (2) the percent of students estimated to be promoted from grade to grade. This method does not measure high school completion. (3 states) Georgia Department of Education August, 2006 All Rights Reserved

  15. WHY CHANGE? Completion Ratio – Number of diploma recipients divided by an approximation of the starting 9th grade class. Method cannot fully account for entering cohort membership, net transfer, and grade retention. (2 states) Dropout Rate – Percent of students enrolled in grades 9 through 12 who drop out during a given school year. High school completion is not measured. (1 state) On-Time Rate – Proportion of all high school graduates in a given year who have received a standard diploma on time. This method compares on-time graduates to those taking longer than four years to earn a diploma. (1 state) Composite Rate – Proportion of students estimated to remain in high school until grade 12 and receive a diploma. The rate for a given year is calculated by multiplying together (1) the rate of persistence between grades 9 and 12 and (2) the percent of completers who receive a diploma rather than another credential. (1 state) Georgia Department of Education August, 2006 All Rights Reserved

  16. WHY CHANGE? Under the National Center for Educational Statistics formula • # of students receiving full, regular program diploma in Spring, 2005. • --------------------------------------------------------------------------- • # of students receiving full, regular program diploma in Spring, 2005. • PLUS • # of students receiving special education diploma in Spring, 2005. • PLUS • # of students receiving certificates of attendance in Spring, 2005. • PLUS • # of drop-outs in grade 12 in 2004-2005 • PLUS • # of drop-outs in grade 11 in 2003-2004 • PLUS • # of drop-outs in grade 10 in 2002-2003 • PLUS • # of drop-outs in grade 9 in 2001-2002 Georgia Department of Education August, 2006 All Rights Reserved

  17. WHY CHANGE? Georgia Department of Education August, 2006 All Rights Reserved

  18. WHY CHANGE? • According to the United States Bureau of Labor Statistics: • Only 6% of the jobs in America are for high school drop-outs • Nationally 25% of our students are dropping-out • What's wrong with this picture ? Georgia Department of Education August, 2006 All Rights Reserved

  19. Employment 1970’s High Skill Low Skill Georgia Department of Education August, 2006 All Rights Reserved

  20. Employment 1990’s High Skill Low Skill Semi Skill Georgia Department of Education August, 2006 All Rights Reserved

  21. Employment 2010 High Skill Low Skill Semi Skill Georgia Department of Education August, 2006 All Rights Reserved

  22. Economic Impact of Georgia Non-Graduates The Economic Impact of High School Non-Completion in Georgia Georgia Southern University Georgia Department of Education August, 2006 All Rights Reserved

  23. Annual Income Comparisons (2004) $51,206 $27,915 $18,734 High School Grads Non-Grads College Grads Georgia Department of Education August, 2006 All Rights Reserved Source: U.S, Census Annual ASEC Supplement

  24. Unemployment Rates High School Non-Graduates Unemployment Rate 8.5% High School Graduates Unemployment Rate 5.5% College Graduates Unemployment Rate 3.1% Georgia Department of Education August, 2006 All Rights Reserved

  25. Unemployment Rates by County (2000) Source: Phyllis Isley and Jeremy R. Hill, "The Economic Impact of High School Non-completion in Georgia" (a study prepared by Georgia Southern University), August 2003, Page 13. Georgia Department of Education August, 2006 All Rights Reserved

  26. It was once preferable being born a B student in Boston than a genius in Beijing. Because a genius in Beijing could not really take advantage of his or her talent. A Global Outlook Georgia Department of Education August, 2006 All Rights Reserved

  27. People in China and India are Starving for your Jobs. Finish Your Homework! Georgia Department of Education August, 2006 All Rights Reserved

  28. “Fortune favors the prepared mind.” – Louis Pasteur Every morning in Africa, a gazelle wakes up. It knows it must run faster than the fastest lion or it will be killed. Every morning a lion wakes up. It knows it must outrun the slowest gazelle or it will starve to death. It doesn’t matter whether you are a lion or a gazelle. When the sun comes up, you better start running. Georgia Department of Education August, 2006 All Rights Reserved

  29. Some parents want an education for their children that greatly resembles the education that they received. Georgia Department of Education August, 2006 All Rights Reserved

  30. Why Change?Georgia’s Secondary Redesign Project? Georgia Department of Education August, 2006 All Rights Reserved

  31. Why Change? Georgia’s Secondary Redesign Project? • Do you think we need to redesign our secondary schools in Georgia? • Take one minute and share your thoughts about this with the person sitting next to you then listen to their thoughts for one minute… Georgia Department of Education August, 2006 All Rights Reserved

  32. Why Change? Have Georgians decided that our high schools are OK? Georgia Department of Education August, 2006 All Rights Reserved

  33. Why Change? You can download this video at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bZo1m2ZUDl8&search=honda%20ok%20factory Georgia Department of Education August, 2006 All Rights Reserved

  34. Georgia Secondary Redesign:WHAT IF WE COULD… • Increase academic rigor for all students. • Increase high school graduation rates. • Increase the number of graduates who earn dual seal diplomas; ready for careers and college. • Produce more globally competitive graduates. “We thought globally but acted locally” Georgia Department of Education August, 2006 All Rights Reserved

  35. The New R’s • Rigor • Relevance • Relationships • Readiness • Reflections = • Results Georgia Department of Education August, 2006 All Rights Reserved

  36. Georgia Department of Education August, 2006 All Rights Reserved

  37. GEORGIA STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT PYRAMID OF INTERVENTION • TIER 4 • SPECIALLY DESIGNED • LEARNING • Targeted students participate in learning that includes: • Specialized programs • Adapted content, methodology, • or instructional delivery • GPS access/extension Increasing Intensity of Intervention • TIER 3 • SST DRIVEN LEARNING • Targeted students participate in learning that is in addition to Tier 1 and Tier 2 and different by including: • Individualized assessments • Interventions tailored to individual needs • Referral for specially designed instruction if needed Decreasing numbers of students • TIER 2 • NEEDS BASED LEARNING: • Targeted students participate in learning that is in addition to • Tier 1 and different by including: • Formalized processes of intervention • Greater frequency of progress monitoring • TIER 1 • STANDARDS-BASED CLASSROOM LEARNING: • All students participate in general education learning that includes: • Implementation of the Georgia Performance Standards through research-based practices • Use of flexible groups for differentiation of instruction • Frequent progress monitoring Georgia Department of Education August, 2006 All Rights Reserved Georgia Department of Education Kathy Cox, State Superintendent of Schools April 12, 2006 All Rights Reserved

  38. Database of Support & Resources Georgia Performance Standards GPS Leadership Training School Improvement Target Practices GAPSS Analysis Graduation Specialist Student Assessment Program Online Assessment System Learning Frameworks Formative Benchmarks AP, PSAT & SAT Program Foreign Language and International Education Secondary Redesign Focus Groups Graduation Counts! Guide Re-Engineering Career, Technical & Agricultural Education American Diploma Project High School Graduation Rule Gifted Education Science Implementation Specialists School Improvement Leadership Facilitator Secondary Redesign Math Science Partnerships PRISM Virtual High School Comprehensive School Reform Grants Alternative Education Successful Practices Network Gifted Education 21st CCLC National Governor’s Association SWD Collaborative Relations Secondary Support and Resources Georgia Department of Education August, 2006 All Rights Reserved

  39. A Report On The Regional Focus Groups On High SchoolRedesign Georgia Department of Education August, 2006 All Rights Reserved

  40. Iowa City, Iowa • Objectivity from the outside • Experience in other states • Accurate recording of ideas Georgia Department of Education August, 2006 All Rights Reserved

  41. The Players Superintendents Principals Teachers Counselors Parents Business People Board Members Students Juvenile Justice Colleges GED Programs Georgia Department of Education August, 2006 All Rights Reserved

  42. What is working in our high schools? • What is not working well in our high schools? • What are the expectations for our high schools? • How well are our high schools meeting expectations? Georgia Department of Education August, 2006 All Rights Reserved

  43. VENUES: • METRO • GRIFFIN • LENOX • FORT VALLEY • VIDALIA • ROME • HOMER • DEARING Georgia Department of Education August, 2006 All Rights Reserved

  44. Priorities and Themes • Employability • Relevant Curriculum • Alignment/Intergration • Transitions • Partnerships • Parent Engagement • Expectation gaps • Addressing Range of Needs • Time and Resources • Culture of the School…the adults • Accountability…Fair and Balanced Georgia Department of Education August, 2006 All Rights Reserved

  45. What examples, ideas, and potential challenges exist related to improving graduation rates, improving average SAT scores, and improving transitions? • Will reform within the system get us to where we need to go, or do we need a complete overhaul of high school? • Who was not part of their discussions and who should be? Georgia Department of Education August, 2006 All Rights Reserved

  46. Research-Based Best Practices • Within the concept of the new 5 R’s • Linked to the Georgia Performance Standards (GPS) and Georgia School Standards (GSS) practices at particular schools… NOT MODEL SCHOOLS! Georgia Department of Education August, 2006 All Rights Reserved

  47. What Do We Change? Beliefs about… • Graduation Rates • Rigor for ALL • Transitions • Advisement • Who is responsible for linking school work with careers • Gaps • Formalized Interventions Georgia Department of Education August, 2006 All Rights Reserved

  48. Graduation Specialist Responsibilities Georgia General Assembly appropriated grant funding for the purpose of hiring a full-time Graduation Specialist in each Georgia High School to be engaged in a process of providing assistance to all high school students, individually and in groups, regarding high school graduation. To fund this initiative, the General Assembly appropriated $40,075 per high school to provide a base salary and benefits to support Georgia high schools employing a Graduation Specialist. This funding will become available in FY 2007 subject to the Governor’s signature or upon HB1027 becoming law. Minimum Qualifications, Experiences and Abilities of the High School Graduation Specialist Any Georgia Professional Standards Commission certification to include the following areas: Teaching, Service (School Counseling, School Psychology, and/or School Social Work), Leadership, or Paraprofessional; At least three years experience in working students; Graduation Coach Georgia Department of Education August, 2006 All Rights Reserved

  49. Assurances from the Local Education Agency The LEA will provide the necessary policy and resource assistance to ensure the success of the Graduation Specialist. Assurance that each high school in its jurisdiction will have the full-time services of a Graduation Specialist who is engaged in high school graduation planning activities, including but not limited to working with students, school faculty and staff, parents, or guardians. Provide salary, benefits, office space, equipment, materials, and supplies at the high school to which each high school Graduation Specialist is assigned. Letter of Intent to Participate in Graduation Specialist Program Each of the 180 systems turned in a Letter of Intent to have Graduation Coaches. Training to support the Graduation Specialist To maximize the productiveness of this newly funded position, the Graduation Specialists will be expected to attend training sessions during the 2006-2007 school year. Training dates are as follows: August 8-10, 2006 October 26, 2006 February 1, 2007 Graduation Coach Georgia Department of Education August, 2006 All Rights Reserved

  50. Graduation Counts Guide Will address: • Utilization of Data for the High School and Feeder Middle School • Culture • Pyramids of Intervention • Advisement • Transition Rigor Relevance Relationships Readiness + Reflections Results Georgia Department of Education August, 2006 All Rights Reserved