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HOW TO TALK ABOUT BOOKS YOU HAVEN’T READ - PIERRE BAYARD. SUMMARY BY: TATIANA LIZARRALDE. HOW TO TALK ABOUT BOOKS YOU HAVEN’T READ -PIERRE BAYARD. SUMMARY SUBSECTIONS 1 AND 2 -WAYS OF NOT READING-. SUBSECTION 1 (Chapter 1) .

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slide1

HOW TO TALK ABOUT

BOOKS YOU HAVEN’T READ

- PIERRE BAYARD

  • SUMMARY
  • BY: TATIANA LIZARRALDE
how to talk about books you haven t read pierre bayard

HOW TO TALK ABOUT BOOKS YOU HAVEN’T READ-PIERRE BAYARD

SUMMARY SUBSECTIONS 1 AND 2

-WAYS OF NOT READING-

subsection 1 chapter 1
SUBSECTION 1 (Chapter 1)
  • The author of this book starts out by lying out some of the reasons why people in general don’t enjoy reading. And this is because they believe that not even a life time will be enough to read near a thousand of the books in the universe. Hence he talk about the two components that books have which are: the location and the content. A person can get the content of the book just by reading it thoroughly and entirely. But, on the other hand, the location of the book is what you really need in order to able to talk about books. This component consists of knowing the time when it was written, other books it can be associated to and an overall knowledge of the content. For example the author states that for the book Ulysses, for the location you must know that it was written by Joyce and that in a way it is a similar retelling of the Odyssey.
subsection 2 chapter 2
SUBSECTION 2 (Chapter 2)
  • In this section of the book, the author introduces the process of skimming through books. He describes that in order to write a well written article or give a conference with talking points from the book it is only necessary to have an overall knowledge of the book. He also mentions that the fastest and easiest way to accomplish this is through skimming the books. Being familiar with the tittle, the author, the way the book is divided, how long it is, the level of vocabulary, be aware of any specific writing trends and have a general idea on the content.
how to talk about books you haven t read pierre bayard1

HOW TO TALK ABOUT BOOKS YOU HAVEN’T READ-PIERRE BAYARD

SUMMARY + QUOTES SUBSECTIONS 3 AND 4

-WAYS OF NOT READING-

subsection 3 chapter 3
SUBSECTION 3 (Chapter 3)
  • In this chapter called: Books you have heard of, the author presents a new technique that the reader and in the future, speakers may use to acquire knowledge on a book they have not read. There are many many books that you have heard about, but that have had the misfortune of not finding it anywhere. Never the less, “The impossibility of accessing the text only served to highlight its projective nature, as the book becomes the receptacle of both characters fantasies.”When confronted to a similar situation in the future you cannot just give up, you must still talk about the book based on the reviews that those around you gave to him, and depending on those built upon it to create a concrete and complete hard copy. Also he goes on to state and explain the logic of books. Which primarily consist of “We derive this ability from the fact that every book is governed by a certain logic …” Including: knowing the antecedendant to predict general outlines, know the internal development of structure, and last is the external environment.
subsection 4 chapter 4
SUBSECTION 4 (Chapter 4)
  • In this chapter: Books you have forgotten, the author moves further on to explain the factor of forgetting the books you read and are exposed to. He clarifies this by stating: “Reading is not just acquainting ourselves with a text or acquiring knowledge; it is also from its first moments, an inevitable process of forgetting.” and then states a possible resolution for this unavoidable issue: note-taking. As the author continues to write he includes the fear of losing memory and being unable to distinguish is you have read a book or not. Explains it as: “It is no great wonder if my book follows the fate of other books, and if my memory lets go of what I write as of what I read, and of what I give as for what I receive.” Which leads to the act of repetition and relationships to the books. In the end it all forms part of the social situation you are encountered in.
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HOW TO TALK ABOUT BOOKS YOU HAVEN’T READ-PIERRE BAYARD

SUMMARY SUBSECTIONS 5 AND 6

-LITERARY CONFRONTATIONS-

subsection 5 chapter 5
SUBSECTION 5 (Chapter 5)
  • One of the things that I found most interesting and agree about in this chapter is the “dialogue of the deaf” As I continued to read the chapter, and as I have learned from my observations I have seen that many times there is a group of people discussing a book they have not read ,the conversation focuses on what they know ,of the content of the book. On the other hand, when they have the read the book, the conversation is more inclined towards how specific scenes or symbols from the book have in some way had and generated an influence in that persons life. I also agree with the term, since talking and hearing about books that no one has read is in a way a non-sense, it like talking but not speaking, and listening but not hearing.
subsection 6 chapter 6
SUBSECTION 6 (Chapter 6)
  • Though it is easy to forget books, or not read them at all, some ways aside from skimming that seems to be really effective is for students to hear lectures form their teachers on the book and mayor themes and topics.
  • Although I agree with Bayard up to a point, I cannot accept his overall conclusion that teachers comments on books that students have not read bring an originality that they would undoubtly have lacked were they to read the book. I agree since yes listening to how different people and professionals perceive a book can open your eyes to new and more original connections, but this does not mean that if you read the book you will not be able to arrive to some similar conclusions and connections.
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HOW TO TALK ABOUT BOOKS YOU HAVEN’T READ-PIERRE BAYARD

SUMMARY SUBSECTIONS 7 AND 8

-WAYS OF BEHAVING-

subsection 7
SUBSECTION 7
  • In this subsection, Pierre Bayard discusses the importance of speaking with grace and confidence when talking about a book. He mentions that details about a certain book are not as important as talking about the book as a whole with a well rounded cultural approach.
  • Bayard also uses Balzac as an example to prove that books are not fixed objects, therefore, imposing one’s ideas can be done so since the book will always be in motion.
  • Using the novels written by David Lodge, Bayard confirms his first condition about talking about a book you have not read. This condition is not being ashamed.
  • “Our feelings of shame arise because our very identity is imperiled by these exchanges…” (pg. 129)
  • I agree with this condition, but I believe that the reason why we are so shy is because when we talk about books we have not read in public we are putting on the line our public image, our knowledge, our reputation. This being true makes speaking without being ashamed hard.
subsection 8
SUBSECTION 8
  • In this subsection, Bayard discuses the importance of inventing books and speaking about yourself.
  • He uses Soseki to proclaim the indispensable importance of inventing.
  • Also, using Oscar Wilde as an example, Bayard proves his point that when meeting to talk about a book, you will always end up talking about yourself. So in order to succeed in this area you must feel comfortable talking about yourself and associating with different scenarios.
  • “For it is not the book itself that is at stake but what it has become within the critical space in which it intervenes and is constantly transformed” (150).
  • I agree with many of the ideas presented in this subsection. Many of the conversations people have about books go in different directions and it is sometimes important to modify the content of a book a little for it to completely back up the position you are supporting.