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Social Stats The Demand for Affordable Housing in Toronto

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Presentation Transcript
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Social Stats

The Demand for Affordable Housing in Toronto

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132,810

Is the total number of people waiting for subsidized housing in Toronto

1

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027,211

Is the number of children waiting for subsidized housing in Toronto

2

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1-5

Is the average number of years’ wait for a subsidized bachelor apartment

3

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5-10

Is the average number of years that a family would have to wait for a subsidized two-bedroom home

4

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7-10

Is the average number of years’ wait for a subsidized one-bedroom home

5

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10-12

Is the average number of years that a family would have to wait for a subsidized three-bedroom home

6

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Toronto ranked 190thinternationally out of 265 cities studied in terms of housing affordability

7

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There are seven low-income families for-every-one moderate-rent unit available in Toronto

9

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In Canada, poverty decreased by 5.1 per cent in the first half of the decade

In Toronto, poverty increased by 10 per cent

11

12

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The poverty line for a family of four in Toronto is $38,610

One-in-three children in Toronto live below the poverty line

14

15

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Median incomes have decreased by 11.7 per cent over a 15-year period

Average rents in Toronto have more than doubled over that same period

16

17

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A family of four would need a ‘living wage’ of $64,783 to meet a minimum standard of living in Toronto that most of society would deem acceptable

18

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A family would need to make $33.20 per hour, full-time, year-round to earn this ‘living wage’

19

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After the minimum wage reaches $10.25 in 2010, a person working full time will earn about $20,000 per year

21

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The average price of a bachelor apartment in Toronto is $9,264 per year—about half of a minimum wage salary

22

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41 per cent of single person households in Toronto live on an annual income of less than $20,800

23

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There are 35.7 per cent more unemployed—about 47,000 people—than there were one year ago

25

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$023

Is the cost per day to provide a homeless person with affordable housing

28

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$069

Is the cost per day of a stay in a shelter

29

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$142

Is the cost per day of a jail cell for a homeless person

30

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$665

Is the cost per day of a hospital bed for a homeless person

31

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Almost half of all tenants in Toronto are spending more than 30 per cent of their income on rent

32

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That is why 132,810 people in Toronto—over five per cent of the population—are in line for subsidized housing.
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References

1. Housing Connections, “Monthly Statistical Report” (September 2009), 2.

2. Housing Connections, “3rd Quarter Statistical Report” (September 2009).

3. Housing Connections, “Applying for rent-geared-to-income housing”(December 2008).

4. Ibid.

5. Ibid.

6. Ibid.

7. Wendell Cox and Hugh Pavletich, “5th Annual Demographia International Housing Affordability Survey,” Demographia (2009), 32.

8. Housing Opportunities Toronto, “An Affordable Housing Action Plan: 2010-2020,” City of Toronto (2009), 31.

9. Toronto Community Foundation, “Toronto’s Vital Signs 2009: Full Report” (2009), 38.

10. Housing Connections, “Internal Statistics” (September 2009).

11. Toronto Community Foundation, “Toronto’s Vital Signs 2008: Full Report” (2008), 9.

12. Ibid.

13. Toronto Community Foundation, “Toronto’s Vital Signs 2009: Full Report” (2009), 5.

14. Toronto Community Foundation, “Toronto’s Vital Signs 2008: Full Report” (2008), 9. The poverty line is considered to be Statistics Canada’s Low Income Cut Off.

15. Toronto Community Foundation, “Toronto’s Vital Signs 2009: Full Report” (2009), 49.

16. Toronto Community Foundation, “Toronto’s Vital Signs 2008: Full Report” (2008), 21.

17. Ibid.

18. Hugh Mackenzie and Jim Stanford, “A Living Wage for Toronto,” Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (November 2008), 9.

19. Ibid.

20. Ibid., 7.

21. Ibid., 11.

22. Canadian Mortgage and Housing Corporation, “Rental Market Statistics” (Spring 2009), 58.

23. Toronto Community Foundation, “Toronto’s Vital Signs 2008: Full Report” (2008), 9.

24. Toronto Economic Development, “Economic Indicators” (August 2009), 2.

25. Ibid.

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References

26. Ibid., 3.

27. Susan MacDonnell, “Losing Ground: The Persistent Growth of Family Poverty in Canada’s Largest City,” The United Way of Greater Toronto (November 2007), 53.

28. Toronto Community Foundation, “Toronto’s Vital Signs 2009: Full Report” (2009), 40.

29. Ibid.

30. Ibid.

31. Ibid.

32. Housing Opportunities Toronto, “An Affordable Housing Action Plan: 2010-2020,” City of Toronto (2009), 17.

33. Ibid.

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