Barry Gilmore (www.barrygilmore.com) - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

trapper
slide1 n.
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Barry Gilmore (www.barrygilmore.com) PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Barry Gilmore (www.barrygilmore.com)

play fullscreen
1 / 91
Download Presentation
Barry Gilmore (www.barrygilmore.com)
107 Views
Download Presentation

Barry Gilmore (www.barrygilmore.com)

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript

  1. Write from Wrong: Strategies for Addressing Student Plagiarism Barry Gilmore (www.barrygilmore.com)

  2. Prompt: Write an essay about names and identity in The House on Mango Street. Most of the women Esperanza knows on Mango Street are either trapped in their marriages or tied down by their children. For example, Esperanza’s grandmother. Esperanza did not want to “inherit her place by the window.” She neither likes what she has already inherited from her grandmother—her name. Esperanza plays with words when she first expresses her dissatisfaction with her name. She says that in Spanish, her name means “too many letters. It means sadness [from the opposite of esperar, which is desesperarse], it means waiting [from the verb esperar].”

  3. Names are a very important part of one’s personality. The name Sarah, for instance, comes from the Bible. This shows that names have a long tradition for many people. Tradition helps to determine the adult one becomes.

  4. Dear Joel, Did you know that my name comes from the Bible? Actually, I’m not sure who Sarah was, but my mom told me she learned about my name in Sunday School when she was a kid. Sarah

  5. Dear Sarah, That’s cool. Joel is a religious name, too. It means God. So I’m like God, only I don’t really think that so don’t think I’m full of myself please. You should find out more about your name. Let me know if you do. Your friend (but not God), Joel

  6. Hey Joel, I don’t think your God either. Sarah P.S. Hey I’m just kidding and I think Joel is a cool name.

  7. Sarah. HA HAHA. I just asked Ms. R about you’re name and she says Sarah was Abraham’s wife and she had a baby when she was 90!!! I don’t know who Abraham was, though, but he’s in the bible too. You should write about that. Joel

  8. That’s a good idea but I don’t want to have a baby when I’m 90 because I couldn’t pick it up or something. Babys are gross anyway. Do you want babies someday? Sarah

  9. Dear Sarah, No way. Joel

  10. Leading questions Who gave you your name? Why? Compare one sound in your name to another sound. Describe that sound. Will you still like your name in 20 years? Why do you like or dislike your name? What mistakes do people make when they say your name? What do they think about you when they hear your name?

  11. From an exchange student… The correct way to pronounce my name is “a’-kee-eh”. Each sylable pronounced distinctly and sharply without blending into the next sylable. Unfortunately, when people try to pronounce it “in the right way,” they actually mispronounce it by creating a whole different word, sound, and meaning: a’-ki-ya. Which means an “empty house” in the Japanese language. In my opinion, being “a key” is better than being an “empty house,” because akie is from the word aki. Which in Japanese language means autumn the best season of the year! Even though the pronunciation of autumn aki is different from the English word “a key” I am willing to be “a key”. I could lock door of an empty house. -AkieMaekawa

  12. Several drafts later…. My name is Sarah. It’s a name from the Bible, but that’s not why I like it. I love my name because it rolls on your tongue, because my mother gave it to me as a gift, and because it ends with the sound you make when you see a beautiful mountain or sunrise. I like to think of my mother holding me after I was born, looking down at me wrapped up like a present and saying my name: Sarah. I don’t know what the grown-up Sarah looks like yet, just like I don’t know what grown-up Sarah does for a job, where she lives, or whether she has a family of her own. When she looks back, I don’t know what she’ll remember about me. But we’ll have one thing in common: a name.

  13. Sample student introduction (Spencer) A symbol is an object, action, or event that represents something or that creates a range of associations beyond itself. In the book A Thousand Splendid Suns, one symbol is the clothing that women have to wear. This clothing reveals many things about the characters and the themes of the work as a whole.

  14. Case Study: Take It Or Leave It (The Christine Pelton Leaf Project) The project: research, writing, presentation

  15. Case Study: Take It Or Leave It (The Christine Pelton Leaf Project) The project: research, writing, presentation Classroom results: 25% plagiarism

  16. Case Study: Take It Or Leave It (The Christine Pelton Leaf Project) The project: research, writing, presentation Classroom results: 25% plagiarism Student/parent contract

  17. Case Study: Take It Or Leave It (The Christine Pelton Leaf Project) The project: research, writing, presentation Classroom results: 25% plagiarism Student/parent contract Administration / school board response

  18. Case Study: Take It Or Leave It (The Christine Pelton Leaf Project) The project: research, writing, presentation Classroom results: 25% plagiarism Student/parent contract Administration / school board response Long-term consequences

  19. Case Study: Take It Or Leave It (The Christine Pelton Leaf Project) A. Teacher/Administration: Students receive a zero B. Parents/Students: Students should be given another chance (rewrite) C. School Board: Students receive a zero, but reduce the value of the assignment

  20. What Are We Talking About? Plagiarism

  21. What Are We Talking About? Student Choices Plagiarism

  22. What Are We Talking About? Student Choices Plagiarism Turnitin.com Failing, rewriting? Punitive response

  23. What Are We Talking About? Pressure: Grades Intent Pressure: Time Ease Student Choices Plagiarism Turnitin.com Failing, rewriting? Punitive response

  24. What’s the Main Reason Your Students Plagiarize? A. It’s easy to do / they get lazy B. They’re confused / it’s a mistake C. They feel pressure about grades D. They get behind on deadlines E. Everyone does it, so they do it too

  25. What Are We Talking About? Pressure: Grades Intent Pressure: Time Ease Student Choices Plagiarism Turnitin.com Failing, rewriting? Punitive response

  26. What Are We Talking About? Pressure: Grades Intent Pressure: Time Ease Teacher Choices Student Choices Plagiarism Turnitin.com Failing, rewriting? Punitive response

  27. Case Study: Take It Or Leave It (The Christine Pelton Leaf Project) Merit and Purpose of Assignment Failure vs. Zero Plagiarism Instruction vs. Assumptions

  28. What Are We Talking About? Pressure: Grades Intent Pressure: Time Ease Teacher Choices Student Choices Plagiarism Assignments Turnitin.com Assumptions Failing, rewriting? Expectations Punitive response

  29. What Are We Talking About? Pressure: Time Pressure: Grades Intent Intent Pressure: Time Ease Ease Teacher Choices Student Choices Plagiarism Assignments Turnitin.com Assumptions Failing, rewriting? Expectations Punitive response

  30. What Are We Talking About? Pressure: Time Pressure: Grades Intent Intent Pressure: Time Ease Ease Teacher Choices Student Choices Culture Plagiarism Assignments Turnitin.com Assumptions Failing, rewriting? Expectations Punitive response

  31. Case Study: Take It Or Leave It (The Christine Pelton Leaf Project) Merit and Purpose of Assignment Failure vs. Zero Plagiarism Instruction vs. Assumptions Alignment of Policy: School and Class Consistency from Classroom to Classroom

  32. What Are We Talking About? Pressure: Time Pressure: Grades Intent Intent Pressure: Time Ease Ease Teacher Choices Student Choices Culture Plagiarism Systems Assignments Turnitin.com Honor Codes Assumptions Failing, rewriting? Ethics Gap Expectations Punitive response

  33. School Culture: Honor Codes

  34. School Culture: Ethics Gap

  35. Reduces Plagiarism Increases Learning

  36. Reduces Plagiarism Increases Learning Honor Code as a part of school culture Honor Code

  37. Reduces Plagiarism Increases Learning Honor Code as a part of school culture Honor Code Turnitin.com as a teaching tool Turnitin.com

  38. Does Turnitin.com work? Sample results from Penn State, 2005

  39. Does Turnitin.com work?

  40. Reduces Plagiarism Increases Learning Honor Code as a part of school culture Honor Code Turnitin.com as a teaching tool Turnitin.com Standardized Expectations and Response Strict Consequences

  41. What’s the Usual Response to Plagiarism in Your School? A. Ignore it B. Deal with it in classroom C. Report it to the administration D. Add to shared files for a two-strike system

  42. School Culture: What’s Going On? Students who cheat tend to: Worry about school Research by Eric M. Anderman

  43. School Culture: What’s Going On? Students who cheat tend to: Worry about school Perceive school as focused on grades Research by Eric M. Anderman

  44. School Culture: What’s Going On? Students who cheat tend to: Worry about school Perceive school as focused on grades Believe they’ll receive rewards for grades Research by Eric M. Anderman

  45. School Culture: What’s Going On? Students who cheat tend to: Worry about school Perceive school as focused on grades Believe they’ll receive rewards for grades Attribute failure to outside circumstances Research by Eric M. Anderman

  46. School Culture: What’s Going On? Students who cheat tend to: Worry about school Perceive school as focused on grades Believe they’ll receive rewards for grades Attribute failure to outside circumstances Avoid deep-level cognitive strategies in problem solving Research by Eric M. Anderman