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M. Salehi. Scientific member of Animal Science Research Institute of Iran Department of Animal Science, Faculty of Agriculture, University of Kerman, Kerman, Iran Topic The effect of shearing time on wool Traits in Baluchi sheep. The effect of shearing time on wool Traits in Baluchi sheep.

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m salehi
M. Salehi
  • Scientific member of Animal Science Research Institute of Iran
  • Department of Animal Science, Faculty of Agriculture, University of Kerman, Kerman, Iran

Topic

The effect of shearing time on wool Traits in Baluchi sheep

slide3

The effect of shearing time on wool Traits in Baluchi sheep

M. Salehi and M. Asadi Fozi

Scientific member of Animal Science Research Institute of Iran

and

Department of Animal Science, Faculty of Agriculture, University of Kerman, Kerman, Iran

wool supply situation
WOOL SUPPLY SITUATION
  • Total fibres: 37.8 million tons
  • 56 % Artificial and 54 % Natural fibers
  • 89.5% plant fibers, 0.03% Silk and 10.47% animal fibers
  • 9.45% Wool ( Wool represents less than 5 percent of the world consumption of fibers), 0.09 % Mohair, 0.0225 % Cashmere, 0.01245 % Alpaca and 0.0015 % Camel hair
slide8

There are 2.034277 million tons of wool that produce by more than 1000 million head of sheep with different breeds

slide9

which

classified as follows

Fine wools

Medium Wools

Crossbred wools

Coarse and long wools

Carpet wool

A: Improved Carpet wool

B: Unimproved Carpet wool Or Mixed

fibre content identification main factors influence the wool price
Fibre Content Identification &‌Main factors influence the wool price

1- Color

2 - Diameter (MFD)

3 - Mean fibre length (MFL)

4 - Medullation

5 - Cuticle or scale

slide11
Pigmentation and Color

The most value belongs to white color but there are a wide range of

Color between Unimproved wool sheep

merino sheep
Merino Sheep

Fine

wool

slide13
Diameter

17-23 micron

(60s and finer)

Staple length

(5 -10 cm)

correidale

Medium Wools Or Crossbred wools

Diameter

23 – 26 micron

(56 - 60s )

Staple length

(5 -10 cm)

Correidale
slide15
Coarse and long wools

Diameter

30 -43 micron

(36 - 50s )

Staple length

(15 -37 cm)

improved carpet wool sheep
New Zealand Romney Marsh

That they are actually crossbred from long wool breed with another breeds

Improved Carpet wool sheep
slide21

Medullation

The other important difference between improved and unimproved wool are ratio and type of medullation in fleece and scale pattern of fibers

slide23

Fine and medium and crossbred wools

Improved carpet

wools

Unimproved or native

carpet wools

slide25

Type of medullation and characters in native carpet wool

Continuous

(40-60 micron)

True wool

(18- 40 micron)

Interrupted and

Fragmental

(30-45 micron)

Kemp fibers

(90-130 micron)

slide27

Literature review

Average fibre diameter (MFD) and its variation (CV) also staple strength (SS) are important raw wool characteristics that greatly influence wool processing properties such as the length of fibres (Hauteur and Barbe).

slide28

Literature review

Staple strength (SS) appears to be related to minimum fibre diameter (FD) along the staple, although there is some evidence that the rate of change in fibre diameter (FD)

may also be involved.

slide29

Therefore CV of fibre diameter (FD) is usually used as a criterion for staple strength (SS) in wool sheep breeding program (Safari et al. 2005).

slide30

Seasonal wool production appears to be largely responsible for variation in staple strength (SS), mean fibre diameter (MFD) and it's CV.

The lowest wool production tends to occur in autumn and winter growth in almost all sheep that rearing in tropics regions and to be sever with lambing. (Butler and Head, 1992 & Henderson, 1967).

slide31

Since the shape of the fibre depends on where it is cut at shearing, one strategy is to aim to shear at weakest point in fibre. There is considerable evidence that shearing ewes just prior to lambing is a useful means in staple strength (Arnold et al. 1984)

slide32

According to Summer (1994) report, clean fleece weight of twice shorn was greater than of once – shorn ewes and mean staple length (SL) of the fleece reflected the interval between shearing and seasonal wool growth.

slide33

Autumn shearing may be associated with a vegetable matter fault and it could result in a bigger financial loss than that due to reduction in mean fibre length (MFL) due to tenderness (Lock, 1994).

slide34

Also once - shorn wool was more discoloured than twice – shorn wool. Average net wool returns were greater for once – shorn than for twice – shorn ewes (Summer, 1994).

slide35

Records on 9535 shearing ofBharat Merino sheep indicated that sir, period of shearing, age, season of shearing and period of birth all had significant effects on greasy fleece yield (Tomar, 2000).

slide36

OBJECTIVE OF STUDY

The main objective of this study were:

the effect of the number of shearing on the fleece traits in Baluchi sheep.

slide37

Iran population sheep's are over 50 millions heads and approximately

65 million kg grease wool or 30 – 33 million kg clean wool have been produced

Baluch sheep breed content 19% of Iran population sheep's

slide38
Baluchi sheep (pure & crossbreed) reared in central and

eastern parts

of Iran under

different

altitude

and weather

with diverse

conditions

slide39

Baluchi sheep have white wool but black patches on face, around the eyes, ears, lower legs and hands

collecting
Collecting

Usually is shorn twice per year; in spring and late summer while some breeders sheared their flocks only once per year.

slide41

MATERIAL AND METHODS

Animals:

Abas Abad sheep station which is situated in Khorasan in North of Iran is used for supporting research on Baluchi sheep.

(In this station some economic traits such as bodyweight and fleece are measured annually).

slide42

The animals were divided into two groups having the same management.

The first group was shorn only once per year in spring while the second group was shorn twice, in spring and late summer.

slide43

But fleece samples were taken from the animals in both groups twice per year i.e. in spring when both group were shorn and in late summer when only second group was shorn.

The experiment was implemented for two years.

slide44
Sampling:

The fiber samples (20 gram) were taken from right mid-side of 52 Baluchi sheep.

mfcd cvfd
MFCD & CVFD

The fibers was prepared and cut for measurement

fiber diameter

with the projection microscope

(ASTM D2130-78)

slide47

The sub sample was paralleled in fibro liner to determine the Simi rigid length in Almeter (Hauteur and Barbe length items)

slide49

The clamped tuft were placed in the grips of tensile testing machine (Instron) and used 1 N capacity load cell with the pulling clamps moved at 25 cm/m. Breaking tenacity calculated (ASTM.D-1294 ).

slide50

DATA ANALYSES

The repeated measurement and general liner model (GLM) was used for the analysis using SAS software package (SAS / STAT User’s Guide, 1987).

slide52
The result shown that the number of shearing had not significant effect on annual fleece weight.

The spring FW in group 1 was significantly higher than group 2.

But the difference was due to one more shearing in group 2 that was performed in the previous autumn.

slide53

Significant difference was found for SL and CV of SL between the two groups.

SL and CV of SL of group 1 was higher than those in group 2

slide56

Changing shearing time can change staple strength in some circumstances but in this search didn't show any significant different between major wool performances expect length and their CV.

But it is not doubt that shearing before lambing has been improves wool characteristics, However in Iran it is not occur because cold weather in late winter the time of lambing.

slide57

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

The authors wish to thank

The conference organizer

The farm staff at Abas Abad station

Thanks also to the technical staff of Animal Science Research Institute of Iran