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Emergency Communications Requirements Christian Ollivry Motorola Regulatory Office EMERGENCY TELECOMMUNICATIONS WORKSHOP PowerPoint Presentation
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Emergency Communications Requirements Christian Ollivry Motorola Regulatory Office EMERGENCY TELECOMMUNICATIONS WORKSHOP
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  1. Emergency Communications Requirements Christian Ollivry Motorola Regulatory Office EMERGENCY TELECOMMUNICATIONS WORKSHOP, ETSI , Sofia Antipolis

  2. Citizen Emergency Radiocommunications overall Objectives Provide Radiocommunications for: • Agencies dealing with • Maintenance of law and order • Response to emergency situation • Safeguarding of life and property • Agencies and organisations dealing with a serious disruption of the functioning of society • Widespread threat of human life • Health, property • Environment • Cooperation between countries for effective humanitarian assistance and support the need for developing countries

  3. Emergency Radiocommunications • Emergency Telecommunications: why? • Emergency Organisations • Type of Interventions • The ITU initiative • Emergency Telecommunications Requirements • Structural • Technology • Network • Users • Spectrum • Organisational • Conclusions

  4. Typical Emergency Agencies or Organisations International organisations Gendarmes Health care Rescue teams Firebrigades Co-ordination National Police CIVIL DEFENSE Traffic control

  5. Emergency and Disaster Relief Interventions International Cross border Local Rural, montaineous & urban areas Regional National

  6. Experience shows when human lives are at risk • Rescue efforts hampered by: • Lack of common and dedicated frequencies • No common equipment available • No customised equipement • Different approach when rescuing • Border crossing and equipment shipment issues • Commercial services congested during emergency and disaster Furthermore… • Future needs • Wireless customised applications helping to fight risks and crisis • Require high data rates (video streaming, multimedia) • More international cooperation

  7. Going forward under the ITU umbrella • European Union, Americas, Asia-Pac intervention Agencies & Organisations to Harmonised radiocommunication frequencies Implement interoperable solutions Within / cross-border To save human lives and properties with all available resources!

  8. ITU-WRC 2003 • WRC 2003 Agenda item 1.3 “to consider identification of globally/regionally harmonized bands, (…) to meet the needs of public protection agencies including those dealing with emergency situations and disaster relief (…)” • WRC 2000 Resolution 645 “to study, as a matter of urgency, identification of frequency bands that could be used on a global/regional basis …to implement future solutions (…) dealing with emergency situations and disaster relief (…)”

  9. ITU member state requirements GERMANY UK KAZAKHSTAN BELARUS NETHERLANDS HUNGARY TURKEY DENMARK FRANCE EMEA ITALY ISRAEL RUSSIA FINLAND IRELAND ESTONIA SWITZERLAND AUSTRIA S. AFRICA • As well as other Organisations: • Other United Nations Agencies, IARU, Interpol, CITEL, E.U., CEPT, APT, ETSI, 13 nation user’s group, Int’l Red Cross CANADA USA North America GUATEMALA COLOMBIA MEXICO PERU HONDURAS BRAZIL Latin America INDIA THAILAND SINGAPORE PNG NEW ZEALAND CHINA Asia Pacific INDONESIA VIETNAM HONG KONG JAPAN KOREA AUSTRALIA

  10. Authority 1) Structural requirements for Emergency Telecommunications • National, local government responsibility • Respect of national legislation • Fullfil legal responsibilities (law enforcement, judiciary police,…) • Meet organisations structure • Local, Regional, National, International/cross-borders • Centralised, decentralised • Group dispatch • Direct Mode Communications,… • Operational autonomy • Relief Agencies and Organisations • National law enforcement agency • Etc. • Users to maintain control

  11. 2) Emergency Technology Requirements ITU survey identified three basic groups/technologies: • Narrowband :wide area networks. Digital voice and low speed data; Telemetry, electrocardiograph,Dispatch alert, etc. (typically up to 30Kbits/s and channel bandwith of 25 KHz or less) • Wideband : wide area networks, Digital voice and medium speed data; e.g. Near real time video, Sensory data, Vehicle status, Finger print (biometrics), Identifying persons, maps, medical records, etc. (typically up to 500 Kb/s and channel bandwith of 150-200 KHz) • Broadband: local/tailored area networks andhot spots. High quality digital real time video and very high speed data; e.g.Video clip-on cameras used by in-building fire rescue,remote medical support, Surveillance of crime scenes including use of remote controlrobotic devices, etc. (typically from 1 to 100 Mb/s)

  12. 3) Main Network requirements for effective mission compliance(all radiocommunication services) • Coverage • Rural and urban populations or properties • Ground to air, coasts, tunnels, undergrounds, all terrains… • From single site ”hot-spot” to ”street-level” services • Network • Spectrum resource availability • Inter-operability and interworking between networks • Roaming between networks of mobile and portable units • Guaranteed access and full service continuity • Authentification, security, traffic, data maintenance • Redundancy • Prompt capacity increase to coverage holes or survive loss of infrastructure • Site security and Power source autonomy • Security • End-to-end encryption • Crypto transparent Security of personnels

  13. 4) Main users’ requirements for effective mission compliancePP1: Day to day operations; PP2: Large Emergency or public events; DR: disasters …also from the PSS users ETSI 2001 questionnaire Features (all services) PP1 PP2 DR Calling modes(voice oriented) PTT (one touch) High High High Dispatch High High High Talk around or DMO Med High High Group Calls (one to many, dynamic calls) Med High High Priorities Med High High Pre-emption calls Med High High Instant call set up(in the order of 100’s ms) Med High High Quality of Service Very High call set up success rate Med High High Robust terminals Dust, heat, shocks,… Med High High Glove/easy manipulation Low High High Wide range of accessoriesLow High High Adapted to Fire-brigades, police, health care, rescue, law enforcement, etc.

  14. 4) Users’ requirements for effective mission compliance (cont) PP1: Day to day operations; PP2: Large Emergency or public events; DR: disasters ….also from project MESA SoR WB • Wide band and broad band Features PP1 PP2 DR • MessagesPerson to person, one to manyHigh High High • Priority intantaneous accessHigh High High • Telemetry such as Location status,sensory data)High Med High • Data base interaction High High Med • Form based record query (criminal, license plate) High High Med • Form based incident report High High High • E-mail (with possible attachments) Med Med Low • Data talk around (on scene communications) Med High High • Data base interaction • Medical records, missing person, HighHigh High • Text file transfer • Filing reportsMedMedMed • Record on offendersHigh Med Low • Image transferHigh High Med • Data base access High High High • VideoHigh Video streaming (with simul voice communications) High High High • High resolution imageryLow Low Med • Robotic controlLow Med High BB

  15. 5) Spectrum requirements • Spectrum Methodology for digital approach • Proposed to Administrations and users • Steps includes identification of • Areas to be covered • Public protection and Disaster Relief populations & penetration rates / type • Advanced applications • Quantify technical parameters • Forecast spectrum needs through 2010’s • Estimates ’01-’02 (different cities, different densities): • Narrow band 11 MHz to 50 MHz • Wide band 4 MHz to 90 MHz • Broad band 45 MHz to 175MHz • Harmonisation of spectrum • Economy of scales • Spectrum efficiency • Better Spectrum planning

  16. Frequency band preliminary view (CEPT-FM)(1 = preferred, 2 = possible, 3 = not considered) Band (MHz) Priority Service Remarks 3-30MHz 3 NB 66-88 2 148-174 2 380-385 1 Decision ERC 96 385-390 2 Military 406.1-430 2 NB/WB 440-470 3 746-806 3 806-869 3 870-876 2 Military 4200-4400 3 4200-4400 2 4400-4950 3 BB 4950-4990 2 FCC 14th Feb ‘02 5150-5875 3

  17. 100% dedicated 100% commercial 6) Network organisations requirements

  18. Dedicated network (100% closed = « intranet » like) Mission critical intervention Disaster National duty Rescue Over the scene accident Government Intelligence Outside network communications Commercial network (100% open « internet » like) Day-to-day operations Large public event Partial emergency handling Typical Public Protection Mission alternatives

  19. SoR Scenarios Spectrum Specifications Standards Success is close co-operation between Administration and manufacturers • Preparation on a national basis • Study the frequency solutions • Technical alignment to be studied • Coordination through technical and preparatory groups • Users • National administrations, CEPT • Manufacturers • Standardization bodies, ETSI • Participation in ITU • WRC 2000 • Resolutions, agenda • ITU-R WP 8A, CPM • Draft, proposals • WRC 2003 • Discussions on harmonized frequency bands

  20. ITU agenda and step forwards • WRC 2000 Approved agenda item 1.3 for WRC 2003 • Oct 01- Feb ’02 WP-8A Draft of CPM text and PDNA including Spectrum Requirements Calculation Candidate Bands User Requirements • Feb ’02 8F Liaison with 8A • May ’02 WP 8A Finalise CPM • Oct ’02 CPM • WRC 2003Obtain decision according to res. 645 ITU Resolution/foot note • > 2003 Implementation • CEPT- ETSI agendas running in parallel.

  21. Emergency Communications • Established harmonised communication benefits: • Improve citizens day-to-day security • Better response to emergency situations • Support needs for developing countries • Economy of scale The users with their administrations are taking increasing ownership. They will decide!

  22. Contacts • ITU http://www.itu.int/ITU-R/ (WP8A-3) • MESA www.projectmesa.org • ETSI www.etsi.org • E.C. http://europa.eu.int/comm/environment/civil/ • Thank you! Merci!