human resource issues in operations management n.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Human Resource Issues in Operations Management PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Human Resource Issues in Operations Management

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 20

Human Resource Issues in Operations Management - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 372 Views
  • Uploaded on

DAVIS AQUILANO CHASE PowerPoint Presentation by Charlie Cook. Human Resource Issues in Operations Management. F O U R T H E D I T I O N. chapter 10. © The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc., 2003. Chapter Objectives.

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'Human Resource Issues in Operations Management' - tolla


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
human resource issues in operations management

DAVIS

AQUILANO

CHASE

PowerPointPresentation

by

Charlie

Cook

Human Resource Issues inOperations Management

F O U R T H E D I T I O N

chapter 10

© The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc., 2003

chapter objectives
Chapter Objectives
  • Describe the changing role of the manager from one of command and control to that of being a team leader and coach, and the additional skills required.
  • Identify the emerging trends that are dramatically changing the way in which people work.
  • Define the concept of employee empowerment and show how it impacts management and the organization.
  • Distinguish between traditional work groups, self-managed teams, and cross-functional teams.

Fundamentals of Operations Management 4e

chapter objectives cont d
Chapter Objectives (cont’d)
  • Present the various ways in which technology is affecting jobs and the workplace.
  • Introduce both behavioral and physical factors that should be taken into consideration when designing jobs.

Fundamentals of Operations Management 4e

the new managerial role
The New Managerial Role
  • Coping with a rapidly changing environment (downsizing and restructuring).
  • Identifying new and innovative ways to produce more with fewer workers and fewer organizational layers.
  • Motivating employees who now feel less committed to organizations than in the past.
  • Assisting workers in taking responsibility for their work.
  • Managing the flow of information.

Fundamentals of Operations Management 4e

the new managerial role1
The New Managerial Role
  • Overseeing the work of employees that work from remote locations.
  • Managing diversity in the organization to:
    • Improve creativity and decision making.
    • Make the organization more responsive to a wider variety of customers.
    • Reduce employee turnover,by preventing conflicts, discrimination, communication breakdowns, and legal actions.

Fundamentals of Operations Management 4e

expanded managerial skill set
Being able to communicate verbally (including the ability to listen)

Managing time and stress

Managing individual decisions

Recognizing, defining, and solving problems

Motivating and influencing others

Delegating

Setting goals and articulating a vision

Being self-aware

Able to build teams

Managing conflict

Expanded Managerial Skill Set

Source: Kin Whetten and David Cameron, Developing Management Skills (New York: Harper Collins, 1995).

Fundamentals of Operations Management 4e

eight different managerial roles and their required core competencies
Eight Different Managerial Roles andTheir Required Core Competencies

Exhibit 10.1a

Source: R.E. Quinn, S.R. Faerman, M.P. Thompson, and M. R. McGrath, Becoming a Master Manager: A Competency Framework (New York: John Wiley and Sons, 1996), p. 23.

Fundamentals of Operations Management 4e

eight different managerial roles and their required core competencies cont d
Eight Different Managerial Roles andTheir Required Core Competencies (cont’d)

Source: R.E. Quinn, S.R. Faerman, M.P. Thompson, and M. R. McGrath, Becoming a Master Manager: A Competency Framework (New York: John Wiley and Sons, 1996), p. 23.

Exhibit 10.1b

Fundamentals of Operations Management 4e

managers then and now
Then

Always had more technical expertise

Could solve all problems

Had the primary responsibility for how their department worked

Knew exactly what was going on in their department

Now

Rarely knows it all (and admits it!)

Doesn’t try to do it all alone

Seldom tells other exactly what to do

Includes others in decisions about the department

Managers: Then and Now

Fundamentals of Operations Management 4e

emerging trends in the workplace
Emerging Trends in the Workplace
  • Increasing Diversity in Workforce Demographics
  • Increasing Use of Flexible Work Hours
  • Part-Time Work and Job Sharing
  • Increasing Use of Temporary Labor
  • The Impact of Technology
    • Recruitment
    • Telecommuting
    • Increase in training and development

Fundamentals of Operations Management 4e

emerging trends in the workplace cont d
Emerging Trends in the Workplace (cont’d)
  • Increasing Emphasis on Teamwork
    • Self-managed or self-directed work teams
      • Autonomous teams responsible for identifying problems, and measuring outcomes.
    • Cross-functional work teams
      • Teams within organizations that have representatives from different areas of the firm

Fundamentals of Operations Management 4e

employee turnover
Employee Turnover
  • Employee Turnover Costs
    • Loss of knowledge
    • Loss of output
    • Hiring costs
    • Termination costs
  • The Hiring Process
    • An effective hiring process reduces turnover by screening out individuals that do not have the required characteristics or skills necessary for them to succeed on the job.

Fundamentals of Operations Management 4e

job design
Job Design
  • Issues in Job Design
    • Quality as part of the worker’s job.
    • Cross-training workers for multi-skilled jobs.
    • Employee involvement and team approaches to designing and organizing work.
    • “Informating” ordinary workers through telecommunications network and computers.
    • Any time, any place production.
    • Automation of heavy manual work.
    • Organizational commitment to providing. meaningful and rewarding jobs for employees.

Fundamentals of Operations Management 4e

job design cont d
Job Design (cont’d)
  • Job Design
    • Tasks and sequences that have to be accomplished and are within an individual’s job assignment.
    • Micromotion: the smallest work activity.
    • Element: two or more micromotions.
    • Task: two or more elements that comprise a complete activity.
    • Job: A set of all the tasks that must be performed by a worker.

Fundamentals of Operations Management 4e

factors in job design
Factors in Job Design

Exhibit 10.2

Fundamentals of Operations Management 4e

behavioral considerations in job design
Behavioral Considerations in Job Design
  • Degree of Labor Specialization
    • Dividing tasks into small increments of work, resulting in efficient operations due to highly repetitive tasks.
    • Job Enlargement (Horizontal Enlargement)
      • Redesigning a job, usually by increasing the number of tasks, to make it more interesting.
    • Job Enrichment
      • Broadening a job description to include both more tasks and greater worker involvement in the planning and design of the work to be done.

Fundamentals of Operations Management 4e

advantages and disadvantages of labor specialization
Advantages and Disadvantagesof Labor Specialization

Exhibit 10.3a

Fundamentals of Operations Management 4e

advantages and disadvantages of labor specialization1
Advantages and Disadvantagesof Labor Specialization

Exhibit 10.3b

Fundamentals of Operations Management 4e

physical considerations in job design
Physical Considerations in Job Design
  • Work Task Continuum
    • Manual tasks
      • Put stress on large muscle groups, causing fatigue.
    • Motor tasks
      • Involve speed and precision in physical movements.
    • Mental tasks
      • Involve rapid decision making base on certain types of stimuli.

Fundamentals of Operations Management 4e

work task continuum human work
Work Task: Continuum (Human Work)

Exhibit 10.4

Fundamentals of Operations Management 4e