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Chief’s Conference New Guidelines for Cervical Cancer Screening PowerPoint Presentation
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Chief’s Conference New Guidelines for Cervical Cancer Screening

Chief’s Conference New Guidelines for Cervical Cancer Screening

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Chief’s Conference New Guidelines for Cervical Cancer Screening

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  1. Chief’s Conference New Guidelines for Cervical Cancer Screening Kevin L. Gilliam II, MD Emory Family Medicine October 4, 2007

  2. How New? • 2006 consensus guidelines: • American Society for Colposcopy and Cervical Pathology (ASCCP) consensus conference • Published • October 2007 • American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology

  3. Background • s/p publication of 2001 guidelines key follow up results have returned from the National Cancer Institute sponsored ASCUS/LSIL Triage Study (ALTS) • 2004 - no guidelines proposed on how to manage HPV DNA testing data • There was also a need for changes to address special populations i.e. adolescents and postmenopausal

  4. Special Considerations • The exact same cytologic result has a different risk of CIN2+ in various groups of women • Adolescent Women (<20y and >13y) • higher prevalence of HPV infections • more minor grade cytologic abnormalities • very low risk for invasive cervical cancer comparatively • Vast majority of HPV infections spontaneously clear within 2 years after infection and are of little long term significance

  5. Atypical Squamous Cells of Undetermined Significance (ASC-US) • A program of DNA testing for high-risk types of HPV (16 and 18), repeat cervical cytologic testing, or colposcopy are all acceptable methods for managing women over the age of 20 years with ASC-US. • “reflex” HPV DNA testing is the preferred testing approach.

  6. ASC-US cont’d • HPV DNA Negative • can be followed up with repeat cytologic testing at 12 months. • HPV DNA Positive • referred for colposcopic evaluation. • Post-colposcopy management • HPV positive but CIN not identified • HPV DNA testing at 12 months or repeat cytological testing at 6 and 12 months.

  7. ASC-US cont’d • If repeat cytologic testing is used for managing women with ASC-US • Testing should be performed at 6-month intervals until 2 consecutive “negative for intraepithelial lesion or malignancy” results are obtained. • Colposcopy is recommended for women with ASC-US or greater cytologic abnormality on a repeat test. • After 2 repeat “negative for intraepithelial lesion or malignancy” results are obtained, women can return to routine cytologic screening • Because of the potential for overtreatment, the routine use of diagnostic excisional procedures such is unacceptable for women with an initial ASC-US in the absence of histologically diagnosed CIN 2,3

  8. Special Populations - Adolescents • Prevalence of HPV DNA positivity changes with age among women with ASC-US. • Rates of HPV DNA positivity are much higher in younger, compared with older women with ASC-US • Follow-up with annual cytologic testing is recommended • At the 12-month follow-up • only adolescents with HSIL or greater on the repeat cytology should be referred to colposcopy • At the 24-month follow-up • ASC-US or greater result should be referred to colposcopy. • HPV DNA testing and colposcopy are unacceptable for adolescents with ASC-US. • If HPV testing is inadvertently performed, the results should not influence management.

  9. Special Populations -Immunosuppressed • HIV-infected, other immunosuppressed women, and postmenopausal women with ASC-US should be managed in the same manner as women in the general population. • Studies have found a lower prevalence of CIN 2,3 and HPV DNA positivity; therefore, immunosuppressed women should be managed in the same manner as women in the general population

  10. Special Populations - Pregnant • Management options for pregnant women over the age of 20 years with ASC-US are identical to those described for nonpregnant women • acceptable to defer colposcopy until at least 6 weeks postpartum. • Unacceptable – endocervical curettage

  11. Atypical Squamous Cells, cannot exclude HSIL (ASC-H) • Prevalence of CIN 2,3 is higher among women with ASC-H than women with ASC-US. • Because of this, ASC-H should be considered to represent equivocal HSIL • Refer for colposcopic evaluation. • In women in whom CIN 2,3 is not identified, follow-up with HPV DNA testing at 12 months or cytological testing at 6 and 12 months is acceptable. • Referral to colposcopy is recommended for women who subsequently test positive for HPV DNA or who are found to have ASC-US or greater on their repeat cytologic tests. • If the HPV DNA test is negative or if 2 consecutive repeat cytologic tests are negative for intraepithelial lesion or malignancy, return to routine cytologic screening is recommended

  12. Low-grade Squamous Intraepithelial Lesions (LSIL) • Over the last decade • Rate of LSIL has increased in the United States and in 2003 the mean LSIL reporting rate was 2.9% for liquid-based specimens. • A result of LSIL is a good indicator of HPV infection • Recent metaanalysis reported that the pooled estimate of high risk (oncogenic) HPV DNA positivity among women with LSIL was 76.6% • The prevalence of CIN 2 or greater identified at initial colposcopy among women with LSIL is 12-16% • Colposcopy is recommended for managing women with LSIL, except in special populations

  13. LSIL cont’d • Data from ALTS indicate that the risk of CIN 2,3 is the same in women with LSIL and those with ASC-US who are high risk (oncogenic) HPV DNA positive. • Manage both groups of women in an identical manner except in special populations

  14. Special Populations - Adolescents • Follow-up with annual cytologic testing is recommended • At the 12-month followup, only adolescents with HSIL or greater on the repeat cytology should be referred to colposcopy. • At the 24-month follow-up, those with an ASC-US or greater result should be referred to colposcopy. • HPV DNA testing is unacceptable for adolescents with LSIL. • If HPV DNA testing is inadvertently performed, the results should not influence management

  15. Special Populations - Postmenopausal • Acceptable options for management include “reflex” HPV DNA testing, repeat cytological testing at 6 and 12 months, and colposcopy. • If the HPV DNA test is negative or CIN is not identified at colposcopy, repeat cytology in 12 months is recommended. • If either the HPV DNA test is positive or the repeat cytology is ASC-US or greater, colposcopy is recommended

  16. Special Populations - Pregnant • Colposcopy is preferred for pregnant, nonadolescent women with LSIL cytology • Deferring the initial colposcopy until at least 6 weeks postpartum is acceptable • In pregnant women who have no cytologic, histologic, or colposcopically suspected CIN 2,3 or cancer at the initial colposcopy, postpartum follow-up is recommended. • Additional colposcopic and cytologic examinations during pregnancy are unacceptable for these women

  17. High grade Squamous Intraepithelial Lesions (HSIL) • HSIL on cytology carries a high risk for significant cervical disease. • A single colposcopic examination identifies CIN 2 or greater in 53-66% of women with HSIL • CIN 2 or greater is diagnosed in 84-97% of women evaluated using a loop electrosurgical excision procedure. • Approximately 2% of women with HSIL have invasive cancer

  18. HSIL cont’d • Colposcopy can miss a significant number of CIN 2,3 lesions • failure to detect CIN 2,3 at colposcopy in a woman with HSIL does not necessarily mean a CIN 2,3 lesion is not present. • As a result, most women with HSIL eventually undergo a diagnostic excisional procedure. • Because of this, many have advocated see-and-treat approaches for managing women with HSIL in which a loop electrosurgical excision is used for initial evaluation. • It should be recognized, however, that many CIN 2,3 lesions, especially in adolescents and young adults, spontaneously regress

  19. HSIL cont’d • Immediate loop electrosurgical excision or colposcopy with endocervical assessment is an acceptable method for managing women with HSIL, except in special populations • When CIN 2,3 is not identified histologically, either a diagnostic excisional procedure or observation with colposcopy and cytology at 6 month intervals for 1 year is acceptable • Provided in the latter case that the colposcopic examination is satisfactory and endocervical sampling is negative • A diagnostic excisional procedure is recommended for women with HSIL in whom the colposcopic examination is unsatisfactory, except in special populations

  20. Special Populations - Adolescents • In adolescents with HSIL, colposcopy is recommended. • Immediate loop electrosurgical excision (ie, “see-and-treat”) is unacceptable in adolescent women. • When CIN 2,3 is not identified histologically • Observation for up to 24 months using both colposcopy and cytology at 6-month intervals is preferred • Provided the colposcopic examination is satisfactory and endocervical sampling is negative. • If during follow-up a high-grade colposcopic lesion is identified or HSIL cytology persists for 1 year, biopsy is recommended. • If HSIL persists for 24 months without identification of CIN 2,3, a diagnostic excisional procedure is recommended. • Diagnostic excisional procedure is recommended for adolescents and young women with HSIL when colposcopy is unsatisfactory or CIN of any grade is identified on endocervical assessment

  21. Special Populations - Pregnant • Colposcopy is recommended for pregnant women with HSIL. • It is preferred that the colposcopic evaluation of pregnant women with HSIL be conducted by clinicians who are experienced in the evaluation of colposcopic changes induced by pregnancy. • Biopsy of lesions suspicious for CIN 2,3 or cancer • Reevaluation with cytology and colposcopy is recommended no sooner than 6 weeks postpartum for pregnant women with HSIL in whom CIN 2,3 is not diagnosed.

  22. Atypical Glandular Cells - AGC • Relatively uncommon, with a mean reporting rate of only 0.4% in the United States in 2003 • Frequently caused by benign conditions, such as reactive changes and polyps it is not uncommon for AGC to be associated with a significant underlying neoplastic condition including: • adenocarcinomas of the cervix, endometrium, ovary, and fallopian tube • Because of the spectrum of neoplasia linked to AGC, initial evaluation must include multiple testing modalities. • colposcopy, endocervical evaluation and sampling, HPV testing, and endometrial evaluation

  23. AGC cont’d • Colposcopy with endocervical sampling is recommended for women with all subcategories of AGC and AIS. • Endometrial sampling is recommended in conjunction with colposcopy and endocervical sampling in women 35 years and older with all subcategories of AGCs and AIS. • Endometrial sampling is also recommended for women under the age of 35 years with clinical indications suggesting they may be at risk for neoplastic endometrial lesions (unexplained VB, chronic anovulation) • Recommended that women with atypical endometrial cells be initially evaluated with endometrial and endocervical sampling • If no endometrial pathology is identified, colposcopy is recommended. If not already obtained, HPV DNA testing at the time of colposcopy is preferred in women with atypical endocervical, endometrial, or glandular cells not otherwise specified (NOS)

  24. AGC cont’d • Postcolposcopy management of women of known HPV status with atypical endocervical, endometrial, or glandular cells NOS who do not have CIN or glandular neoplasia identified histologically • repeat cytologic testing combined with HPV DNA testing at 6 months if they are HPV DNA positive • 12 months if they are HPV DNA negative • Referral to colposcopy is recommended for women who subsequently test positive for high risk (oncogenic) HPV DNA or who are found to have ASC-US or greater on their repeat cytologic tests. • If both tests are negative, women can return to routine cytologic testing. • The recommended postcolposcopy management of women of unknown HPV status with atypical endocervical, endometrial, or glandular cells NOS who do not have CIN or glandular neoplasia identified histologically • Cytologic testing at 6-month intervals is recommended • After 4 consecutive “negative for intraepithelial lesion or malignancy” results are obtained, women can return to routine cytologic testing.

  25. Special Populations - Pregnant • Initial evaluation of AGC should be identical to that of nonpregnant women, except that endocervical curettage and endometrial biopsy are unacceptable

  26. Other – Benign Appearing Endometrial Cells • Asymptomatic premenopausal women with benign endometrial cells, endometrial stromal cells, or histiocytes • No further evaluation is recommended. • For postmenopausal women with benign endometrial cells • Endometrial assessment is recommended regardless of symptoms

  27. Other – Benign Appearing Glandular Cells after Hysterectomy • Cytologic report of benign glandular cells • no further evaluation is recommended.

  28. HPV • Most newly acquired HPV infections clear spontaneously and the prevalence of HPV DNA positivity drops with age from a peak in adolescents and women in their 20s • Therefore, HPV testing should be used only for routine screening in women 30 years of age and older.

  29. HPV cont’d • In screening studies from North America and Europe, the pooled sensitivity and specificity of HPV testing for the detection of CIN 2 or greater in women 35 years and older is 95% and 93%, respectively. • For comparison, pooled sensitivity and specificity of cytology at a threshold of ASC-US are 60% and 97%, respectively. • Sensitivity using a combination of HPV testing and cytology is significantly higher than that of either test alone with negative predictive values of 99-100%

  30. HPV cont’d • 30 years of age and older who have a cytology result of “negative for an intraepithelial lesion or malignancy” but test positive for HPV • Repeat cytology and HPV testing at 12 months is preferred. • If on repeat testing HPV is detected, colposcopy is recommended. • Women found to have an abnormal result on repeat cytology should be managed according to the appropriate 2006 Consensus Guidelines

  31. Questions???