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The Role of Maternal and Child Health in Addressing Child Maltreatment PowerPoint Presentation
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The Role of Maternal and Child Health in Addressing Child Maltreatment

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The Role of Maternal and Child Health in Addressing Child Maltreatment

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  1. The Role of Maternal and Child Health in Addressing Child Maltreatment Erin Lyons, MPH Children’s Safety Network National Injury & Violence Prevention Resource Center www.childrenssafetynetwork.org CSN is funded by: HRSA’s Maternal & Child Health Bureau

  2. Presentation Objectives • Provide an overview of child maltreatment • Discuss the value and outcomes of broad partnerships to prevent child maltreatment • Provide examples of state-level partnerships to address child maltreatment

  3. Child Maltreatment • Physical Abuse • Sexual Abuse • Emotional/Psychological Abuse • Neglect

  4. Introduction to the Issue: Who are the maltreated children? Children eligible for adoption – parental rights terminated (67,000) Victims who receive services through the child welfare system (691,000) Children determined by CPS to have experienced maltreatment (906,000) Children who experience maltreatment

  5. Introduction to the Issue: Risk Factors for Abuse and Neglect Ecological Model • Child factors: physical disability; behavioral & emotional problems; young age • Parent factors: History of abuse and/or witnessing of abuse in family of origin; young age; substance abuse; mental illness & depression; unplanned pregnancy • Family factors: Domestic violence; poverty; previous involvement with child welfare/CPS system • Community factors: Neighborhoods characterized by violence, poverty, low levels of social support; social norms re: discipline & privacy of the home; perceptions that nothing can be done • Policy-level factors: CPS legislation/definitions of abuse and neglect

  6. Introduction to the Issue:Consequences of child maltreatment • Physical injuries, including death • Psychological & emotional harm; long term disruptions in development • Increased risk for aggression, delinquency, substance abuse, depression, suicide and other risk behaviors as an adolescent • Increased risk for future physical violence perpetration & victimization • Early (and unintended) pregnancy and exposure to STDs • Adverse health effects as an adult, including alcoholism, drug abuse, eating disorders, obesity and suicide • Increased risk for child maltreatment perpetration as an adult

  7. Related MCH priorities • Teen pregnancy prevention • Maternal depression awareness & prevention • Domestic violence & sexual assault prevention • Death reviews – fetal and infant; child • Adolescent/school health & safety

  8. The role of MCH in statewide efforts to address child maltreatment • MCH brings public health primary prevention perspective • Reframe the issue of child maltreatment • Change community norms • Implement population-based strategies • MCH is connected to the community in a non-punitive or investigative way

  9. Outcomes of Partnerships around Child Maltreatment • Integration of CAN prevention into routine MCH programs • Ability to address the needs of children not served by CPS • Improved surveillance and a better understanding of the problem • Leveraging of new funding sources

  10. State-level Partnerships to Address Child Maltreatment North Carolina • Health department is member of the NC Institute of Medicine Task Force on Child Abuse Prevention. • Task Force members include representatives from: • Juvenile Justice • Child Development • Public Instruction • State Government • Social Services • Substance Abuse/Developmental Disabilities/Mental Health • Community-based private and non-profit organizations

  11. State-level Partnerships to Address Child Maltreatment Minnesota • MCH unit in the health department participated in the Home Visitor Training Partnership to develop a training system for home visitors based on strength-based approach • Partners in effort included: • Head Start • Minnesota Early Learning Design • Early Childhood Family Education

  12. State-level partnerships to address child maltreatment Virginia • Center for Violence and Injury Prevention participated in state planning to prevent child maltreatment. • Planning initiated by DSS and Prevent Child Abuse Virginia. • Partners included JJ, DV, Education, Family & Children’s Trust Fund, Attorney General. • Developed recommendations focused building statewide infrastructure for prevention.

  13. Emerging Issues to Address Through Partnerships • Universal parenting education or parent support programs • Response to methamphetamine • Promoting safe sleep practices

  14. The Children’s Safety NetworkNational Injury & Violence Prevention Resource Center Contact Information: Erin Lyons elyons@edc.org www.childrenssafetynetwork.org CSN is funded by: HRSA’s Maternal & Child Health Bureau