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A Guide for Completing the Teacher Work Sample (TWS) Portfolio

A Guide for Completing the Teacher Work Sample (TWS) Portfolio

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A Guide for Completing the Teacher Work Sample (TWS) Portfolio

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  1. A Guide for Completing the Teacher Work Sample (TWS) Portfolio J.Burden, J.Hoffman, J. Hrevnack, P. Klein, F. Lineberry, S. Mendelson, M. Tomich

  2. College of Education Spectrum Model College of Education Learning Outcomes Key Components of the TWS Portfolio Implementation of TWS Portfolio Introduction Philosophy Statement Contextual Factors Learning Goals Assessment Plan Design for Instruction Instructional Decision Making Analysis of Student Learning Self-Evaluation & Reflection FAQ Examples of Teacher Work Sample Portfolios Teacher Work Sample Portfolio Tutorial Index(Click to access each item within the tutorial)

  3. Teacher Work Sample (TWS) Purpose and Overview A Teacher Work Sample is a process that enables teacher candidates to demonstrate teaching performances directly related to the implementation of a standards-based instructional unit by planning, instructing and assessing P-12 student learning. The TWS will incorporate standards such as the College of Education’s Learning Outcomes, the NJCCCS and a student’s program’s standards.  Candidates analyze student learning and reflect on their teaching effectiveness.

  4. Kean University’s College of Education SPECTRUM Model You may have noticed the SPECTRUM logo on your Kean documents throughout the College of Education and in your program. The SPECTRUM embraces the components of general education, specialization, and professional education while emphasizing their role in the acquisition, application, and evaluation of knowledge, skills, and values/dispositions. This model is based on the premise that a teacher is first and foremost a committed professional whose primary responsibilities are within three categories: identifying educational problems, developing solutions, and applying professional knowledge, skills and dispositions. Each of these components, in turn, is composed of many subskills, attitudes, and values. RETURN TO INDEX

  5. The Learning Outcomes of the SPECTRUM Model Knowledge Subject Matter • The beginning teacher has a thorough understanding and knowledge of subject matter and national, professional, and New Jersey Core Curriculum Content Standards, and uses such knowledge to create effective learning experiences for students. Student Learning • The beginning teacher has knowledge of how students learn and develop and creates opportunities for each student’s academic development. Diversity of Learners • The beginning teacher understands differences in how students learn and knows how to provide instruction to accommodate such diversity. Classroom Management • The beginning teacher understands classroom management theories. Assessment • The beginning teacher knows how to assess, evaluate, analyze, and monitor student learning. RETURN TO INDEX

  6. Learning Outcomes continued Skills Planning Instruction • The beginning teacher plans instruction based on knowledge of subject matter, of national, professional, and New Jersey Core Curriculum Content Standards, of students, and of curriculum goals and models. Instructional Strategies/Technologies • The beginning teacher uses a variety of instructional strategies and technologies that encourage each student to develop critical thinking and problem-solving skills. Learning Environment • The beginning teacher creates a learning environment that encourages active, engaged learning, positive interaction, and self-motivation for all students. Communication • The beginning teacher effectively communicates in the classroom by using a variety of communication skills including verbal and nonverbal techniques, technology, and media. Assessment • The beginning teacher effectively uses formal and informal assessment strategies to evaluate student progress and makes appropriate adjustments to instruction based on his/her assessment. Student Support • The beginning teacher works with parents/family members, school colleagues, and community members to support student learning and development. Reflection and Professional Development • The beginning teacher is a reflective practitioner who continually evaluates the effects of her/his choices and actions on others (students, parents, and other professionals in the learning community) and who actively seeks opportunities to grow professionally. RETURN TO INDEX

  7. Learning Outcomes continued Dispositions Diversity/Individual Differences • The beginning teacher appreciates individual, cultural, and linguistic differences, shows respect for the diverse talents of all learners, and is committed to helping develop self-confidence and competence. High Expectations • The beginning teacher believes that all students can learn at high levels and persists in helping all students achieve success. Community/Culture • The beginning teacher works productively within community and cultural norms. Positive Climate • The beginning teacher takes responsibility for establishing a positive climate in the classroom and participates in maintaining such a climate in the school as a whole. Positive Role Model • The beginning teacher recognizes her/his responsibility to serve as a positive role model. Life-long Learner • The beginning teacher is a life-long learner who seeks out opportunities for continued growth. RETURN TO INDEX

  8. Aligning the Learning Outcomes with the Teacher Work Sample Click on this link to see how the processes of the Teacher Work Sample supports Kean’s Teacher Candidates in meeting the Learning Outcomes of the College of Education Aligning the Learning Outcomes with the Teacher Work Sample Aligning the Learning Outcomes with the Teacher Work Sample Click to link to the alignment chart. RETURN TO INDEX

  9. Your College of Education is nationally accredited by the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education Programs (NCATE) The Teacher Work Sample is one of the assessments that provide data about our programs’ effectiveness. RETURN TO INDEX

  10. Key Components of the Teacher Work Sample Portfolio • Introduction • Philosophy Statement • Contextual Factors • Learning Goals • Assessment Plan • Design for Instruction • Instructional Decision Making • Analysis of Student Learning • Self-Evaluation and Reflection RETURN TO INDEX

  11. IMPLEMENTATION OF THE TWS PORTFOLIOAt the Introductory Level (Sophomore Field)Introduction Philosophy Statement Contextual Factors At the Preprofessional Level (3000-level identified courses taken concurrently with Preprofessional Internship) Learning Goals Assessment Plan Design for Instruction Instructional Decision-Making (plus Introduction) RETURN TO INDEX

  12. At the Professional Level (during Professional Internship and in conjunction with capstone course ) • Introduction • Philosophy Statement • Contextual Factors • Learning Goals • Assessment Plan • Design for Instruction • Instructional Decision Making • Analysis of Student Learning • Reflection/Self Evaluation • Writing Mechanics and Appearance RETURN TO INDEX

  13. Let’s look at each of the elements of the Teacher Work Sample Portfolio separately… • Including: • A description of each element • How to write/what to include with each element • The rubric used to evaluate each element RETURN TO INDEX

  14. Description of the TWS Introduction Introduction The purpose of the Introduction is to describe how the teacher candidate documents the Learning Outcomes of the College of Education. It is through the Learning Outcomes that the connections are made between theory and practice in teaching. The theories are highlighted within the seven processes of TWS and aligned with the COE Spectrum Model Learning Outcomes. These theories are connected to instructional experiences, which are illustrated through specific documents included in the TWS. RETURN TO INDEX

  15. How to Write the TWS Introduction Statement In preparing an Introduction statement, the teacher candidate should be aware that it is a one to two page statement which informs the reader of: 1) The purpose of the portfolio, 2) The Spectrum Model Learning Outcomes met, 3) Relevant connections to the Spectrum Model Learning Outcomes and the standards of the TWS, 4) The organizational format of the TWS portfolio For example, the teacher candidate may want to begin with a statement such as: “This is the personal Teacher Work Sample portfolio of John Doe. The purpose of my Teacher Work Sample is to highlight the transition between theory and practice, through the illustration of practical documents which are connected to learning outcomes within the scope of the Spectrum Model in the Kean University College of Education. ……” RETURN TO INDEX

  16. Introduction Rubric (Click to link to the rubric) RETURN TO INDEX

  17. Description of the Philosophy Statement Philosophy Statement The primary purpose of teacher candidates writing and including the philosophical statement in the Teacher Work Sample (TWS) portfolio is to introduce the concept of philosophy and provoke thought for communicating their personal philosophies relevant to their teaching beliefs in their specific content area. RETURN TO INDEX

  18. What is a Philosophy Statement? The philosophy of teaching statement is a narrative that includes: • your personal perspective of teaching and learning (personal philosophy) • a description of your teaching methods according to the Spectrum Model, for facilitating K-12 student learning • justification for why you teach that way *(use examples from observations and practical experiences) RETURN TO INDEX

  19. How to Write The Philosophy Statement In the philosophical statement, the teacher candidate should: • demonstrate evidence that K-12 students are the focus of discussion. • utilize the Spectrum Model as a framework of the discussion. • demonstrate evidence of theory and research as it relates to philosophical perspectives (ex: naturalism, pragmatism, existentialism, etc.) • provide examples from the field that illustrate your understanding of teaching and learning. RETURN TO INDEX

  20. Philosophy Statement Checklist Does your philosophy statement: ____  Describe teaching/learning through the Spectrum Model as framework?____  Present a view of the K-12 student as a learner and focus of discussion? ____  Explain your perspective on how all K-12 students best learn? ____  Identify theory or research related to teaching and learning perspectives? ____  Describe examples from the field that highlight your understanding of teaching and learning? RETURN TO INDEX

  21. Philosophy Statement Rubric (Click to link to the rubric.) RETURN TO INDEX

  22. Contextual Factors To be completed by: Introductory (Level I) and Professional Interns (Level III) TWS Standard The teacher uses information about the learning-teaching context and student individual differences to set learning goals and plan instruction and assessment. Task Discuss relevant factors and how they may affect the teaching-learning process. Include any supports and challenges that affect instruction and student learning. RETURN TO INDEX

  23. RequirementsIn the discussion, include: Community, district and school factors. Address geographic location, community and school population, socio-economic profile and race/ethnicity. Stability of community, political climate, community support for education, and other environmental factors may also be addressed. NOTE: NJ School Report Card is a good resource. RETURN TO INDEX

  24. Classroom factors Address physical features, availability of technology equipment and resources and the extent of parental involvement. Also to be discussed are other relevant factors such as classroom rules and routines, grouping patterns, scheduling and classroom RETURN TO INDEX

  25. Student characteristics Address student characteristics which must be considered as instruction design and learning assessed. Include factors such as age, gender, race/ethnicity, special needs, inclusion, English Language Learners (ELL), achievement/ developmental levels, culture, language interests, learning styles/modalities or students’ skill levels. In the narrative, make sure to address students’ skills and prior learning that may influence the development of learning goals, instruction and assessment. • NOTE: Include state/standardized test score data. RETURN TO INDEX

  26. Instructional implications Address how contextual characteristics of the community, classroom and students have implications for instructional planning and assessment. Include specific instructional implications for English Language Learners (ELL) and special needs inclusion students multiple intelligences and any other factors that will influence how a unit is planned and implemented. Tell why this information is important to a teacher. RETURN TO INDEX

  27. RETURN TO INDEX

  28. Contextual Factors Rubric (Click to link to the rubric.) RETURN TO INDEX

  29. Learning Goals To be completed by: Pre-professional (Level II) and Professional Interns (Level III) TWS Standard The teacher sets significant, challenging, varied and appropriate learning goals. Task Discuss relevant factors and how they may affect the teaching-learning process. Include any supports and challenges that affect instruction and student learning. Insure that all the elements in the LEARNING GOAL RUBRIC are included. See the Guide to Compiling the Teacher Work Sample Portfolio RETURN TO INDEX

  30. Requirements • List the learning goals (not the activities) that will guide the planning, delivery and assessment of the unit. These goals should define what students are expected to know and be able to do at the end of the unit. The goals should be significant (reflect the big ideas or structure of the discipline) challenging, varied and appropriate and expressed in behavioral terms, i.e., defining what students are expected to be able to do. Number or code each learning goal so it can be referenced to later. • Explain how the goals are aligned with local, state, and national standards (identify the source of the standards). • Describe the types and levels of the learning goals. • Discuss why the learning goals are appropriate in terms of development; pre-requisite knowledge, skills, and other student needs. RETURN TO INDEX

  31. How to write the Learning Goals In this section the learning goals are specified. While this section in its final form is expected to be in a narrative format, it is useful to examine the NJCCCS standards before determining your learning goals as in the following example: Standard(s) (Indicate NJCCCS number and description and check cumulative progress indicators (CPIs) for your grade level.) STANDARD 4.2 • Geometry and Measurement • ALL STUDENTS WILL DEVELOP SPATIAL SENSE AND THE ABILITY TO USE GEOMETRIC PROPERTIES, • RELATIONSHIPS, AND MEASUREMENT TO MODEL, DESCRIBE AND ANALYZE PHENOMENA. (this will correspond to the learning goals) RETURN TO INDEX

  32. Procedure(continued) Once you’ve identified the appropriate standards for your unit, the next step is to write the learning goals. Most learning goals start with this phrase: “Students will be able to…” Care should be taken to include lower and higher level thinking skills. i.e., Bloom’s Taxonomy. Example of objective: Students will be able to describe, draw compare, and classify geometric objects; communicate effectively using geometric terms; gather, analyze and apply geometric information in problem solving. RETURN TO INDEX

  33. Procedure (Continued) The next step is to transfer the outline into a narrative form. Examples: Learning Goals Learning goal #1 The students will be able to understand what causes night and day. Justification This goal is aligned with the New Jersey Core Curriculum Content Standards for Second Grade Science. The standards are 5.9 A. 1 “Recognize that the sun supplies light and heat to the Earth’ and 5.9 B. 1. “Recognize that the sun can only be seen during the day, but the moon can be seen sometimes at night and sometimes during the day”. This goal accommodates kinesthetic, visual, and auditory learners. Based on this, the students will be able to understand that fact that the Earth rotates causing night and day instead of thinking that the sun moves. The students will also be able to understand that while one side of the Earth has day the other side has night due to the fact that the sun can only shine on one side at a time. This learning goal is developmentally appropriate because it is not too abstract for the students to understand that the Earths rotation causes night and day. RETURN TO INDEX

  34. Procedure (Continued) Learning goal #2 The students will be able to explore the affect of their shadow due to the changing of the sun’s position. Justification This goal is aligned with the New Jersey Core Curriculum Content Standards for Second Grade Science. The standard is 5.9 A. 2 “Observe the patterns of day and night and the movements of the shadows of an objects on the Earth during the course of a day.” This goal mainly accommodates visual learners. The students are expected to know how the sun’s position affects their shadows. RETURN TO INDEX

  35. Procedure (Continued) Learning goal #3 The students will be able to acknowledge the fact that groups of stars forming a picture/ pattern are considered a constellation. Justification This lesson coincides with standard 5.9 C. 2. Of the New Jersey second grade science standards. Which states that the children will “Observe that the position of the stars, with respect to each other (constellations) is unchanging.” This learning goal involves hands-on activities for kinesthetic learners. This goal is also visual for those that learn that way. Mainly the children will learn that stars form pictures that are known as constellations. RETURN TO INDEX

  36. Procedure (Continued) Learning goal #4 The students will be able to know the name and locate different constellations. Justification This goal addresses the needs of multiple learning styles; kinesthetic, visual, and auditory. Activities will address the learning levels of knowledge and comprehension with hands-on activities and model construction. This goal goes along with standard 5.9 C.2 “Observe that the position of the stars, with respect to each other (constellations) is unchanging.” The children will learn how to find specific constellations while looking at a star map. RETURN TO INDEX

  37. Concluding thoughts about writing your learning goals… • In concluding this section the writer should ascertain that the following elements are included in the section on Learning Goals. Learning Goals: • The teacher sets significant, challenging, varied and appropriate learning goals. • Significance, Challenge and Variety • Clarity • Appropriateness for students • Alignment with national, state or local standards RETURN TO INDEX

  38. Learning Goals Rubric (Click to link to the rubric.) RETURN TO INDEX

  39. Assessment PlanTo be completed by: Pre-professional Field Experience Students (Level II) and Professional Interns (Level III). TWS Standard The teacher uses multiple assessment modes and approaches aligned with learning goals to assess student learning before, during and after instruction. Task Design an assessment plan to monitor student progress toward learning goal(s). Use multiple assessment modes and approaches aligned with learning goals to assess student learning before, during, and after instruction. These assessments should authentically measure student learning and may include performance-based tasks, paper-and-pencil tasks, or personal communication. Describe why the assessments are appropriate for measuring learning. Suggested Page Length: 2 + pre- & post-assessment instruments, scoring rubrics/keys, and assessment plan table. RETURN TO INDEX

  40. Requirements: Provide an overview of the assessment plan. The purpose of this overview is to depict the alignment between learning goals and assessments. Show adaptations used to meet the individual needs of students to problem solve or to reflect contextual factors. Include methods of formal, informal, and student self-assessment. For each learning goal include: assessments used to judge student performance, format of each assessment, and adaptations of the assessments for the individual needs of students based on pre-assessment and contextual factors. A visual organizer such as a table, outline or other means must be used to make the plan clear. Describe the pre- and post-assessments that are aligned with the learning goals. Clearly explain how pre-and post-assessments will be evaluated or scored, including criteria used to determine if the students’ performance meets the learning goals. Include copies of assessments and/or student directions and criteria for judging student performance (e.g., scoring rubrics, observation checklist, rating scales, item weights, test blueprint, answer key). Discuss the plan for formative assessment that will help to determine student progress during the unit. Describe the assessments planned to evaluate student progress and comment on the importance of collecting that particular evidence. Although formative assessment may change as the unit progresses, the task here is to predict at what points in the instructional sequence it will be important to assess students’ progress toward learning goals. RETURN TO INDEX

  41. Example of Assessment Plan Table: KindergartenVisual Organizer RETURN TO INDEX

  42. Assessment Plan Rubric Click to link to the rubric. RETURN TO INDEX

  43. Design for Instruction To be completed by: Preprofessional Field Experience Students (Level II) and Professional Interns (Level III) TWS Standard The teacher designs instruction for specific learning goals, student characteristics and needs and learning contexts. Task Describe how the design of the unit instruction relates to unit goals, students’ characteristics and needs, and the specific learning context. RETURN TO INDEX

  44. Requirements: Results of Pre-Assessment After administering the pre-assessment, analyze student performance relative to the learning goals. Depict the results of the pre-assessment in a format that allows patterns of student performance to be found relative to each learning goal. Unit Overview Provide an overview of the unit. Use a visual organizer such as a block plan or outline to make the unit plan clear. Include the topic or activity planned for each day/period. Also indicate the goal or goals (coded from the Learning Goals section) that will be addressed in each activity. Make sure that every goal is addressed by at least one activity and that every activity relates to at least one goal. RETURN TO INDEX

  45. Activities Describe at least three unit activities that reflect a variety of instructional strategies/techniques and explain why those specific activities are planned. In the explanation for each activity, include: • how the content relates to the instructional goal(s), • how the activity stems from the pre-assessment information and contextual factors, • what materials/technology are necessary to implement the activity, • how are plans made to assess student learning during and/or following the activity (i.e. formative assessment), • how the unit and/or the lesson plan incorporates contextual factors particularly of the student learner. RETURN TO INDEX

  46. Technology Describe how technology will be used in the planning and/or instruction. If there is no plan to use any form of technology, provide a clear rationale for its omission. The suggested page length for the Design for Instruction: 3 pages plus the visual organizer RETURN TO INDEX

  47. Design for Instruction Rubric Click to link to the rubric. RETURN TO INDEX

  48. Instructional Decision-MakingTo be completed by: Pre-professional Field Experience Students (Level II) and Professional Interns (Level III). TWS Standard The teacher uses on-going analysis of student learning to make instructional decisions. Task Provide two examples of instructional decision-making based on students’ learning or responses. RETURN TO INDEX

  49. Requirements: Think of a time during the unit when a student’s learning or response caused a modification of the original design for instruction. (The resulting modification may affect other students as well.) Cite specific evidence to support answers to the following: Describe the student’s learning or response that caused a modification of plans. The student’s learning or response may come from a planned formative assessment or another source (not the pre-assessment). Describe what was done next and explain why this would improve student progress toward the learning goal. Now, think of one more time during the unit when another student’s learning or response caused a modification of a different portion of the original design for instruction. (The resulting modification may affect other students as well.) Cite specific evidence to support the answers to the following: Describe the student’s learning or response that caused a modification of the plans. The student’s learning or response may come from a planned formative assessment or another source (not the pre-assessment). Describe what was done next and explain why this would improve student progress toward the learning goal. Suggested Page Length: 3 RETURN TO INDEX

  50. Instructional Decision-Making Rubric Click to link to the rubric. RETURN TO INDEX