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ON THE CUTTING EDGE OF TECHNOLOGY. Bob Goodson Chief Operating Officer TSE/ EMC Technologies. Overview. “Utility Of the Future” (UOF) Where is technology heading Cooperatives have a role New technology trends Consumer expectations of their service providers .

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on the cutting edge of technology

ON THE CUTTING EDGE OF TECHNOLOGY

Bob Goodson

Chief Operating Officer

TSE/ EMC Technologies

overview
Overview
  • “Utility Of the Future” (UOF)
  • Where is technology heading
  • Cooperatives have a role
  • New technology trends
  • Consumer expectations of their service providers
utility of the future uof
“Utility of the Future” (UOF)
  • Integration of energy supply chain
    • Power Resources
    • Transmission and distribution
    • Consumer
  • Intelligent grid in the UOF
    • Role of the intelligent grid (distribution infrastructure)
    • Utility of the Future business model
    • Integrating utility business operations & strategies through the intelligent grid
utility of the future uof role of the intelligent grid
Utility of the Future (UOF): Role of the Intelligent Grid

Generation & Transmission:

UOF Infrastructure& Energy Ops:

Intelligent Grid(Integrated Market Hub)

  • AMR/AMI (customer interface)
  • Utility customer systems
  • Utility operating & delivery systems
  • Regional market interface & system(RTO/ISOs, power pool, etc.)
  • Market-side monitoring/verification
  • Affiliated services (gas/water)

Distribution Entity:

Integrated Energy Supply Portfolio Operations

  • Time-based data analysis/comm/control functionality (MDM)
  • System reliability & planning (ancillary, OMS, SCADA/GIS)
  • Balanced portfolio management (supply/demand/usage)
    • Energy efficiency, DR/DSM, TOU/CPP, etc.
    • Renewables & environmental (carbon)
    • Distributed energy resources (DER)
  • Dmd response infrastructure (DRI) & “intelligent” dispatch
  • Customer satisfaction & segment service/value benefit

“Intelligent” T&D Infrastructure SupportsIntegratedEnergy Operations & Resource Portfolios

Source: “New Smart Grid Technology is Anti-gridlock”, Energy Central, March 2007

slide5

Generation & Transmission:

UOF Infrastructure & Energy Ops:

Intelligent Grid(Integrated Market Hub)

  • AMR/AMI (customer interface)
  • Utility customer systems
  • Utility operating & delivery systems
  • Regional market interface & system(RTO/ISOs, power pool, etc.)
  • Market-side monitoring/verification
  • Affiliated services (gas/water)

Distribution Entity:

“Integrated” Strategic Business Planning

  • Energy Infrastructure
  • Operations
  • Supply Portfolio
  • Market-side Development
  • Community Economic Growth & Benefit

Integrated Energy Supply Portfolio Operations

  • Time-based data analysis/comm/control functionality (MDM)
  • System reliability & planning (ancillary, OMS, SCADA/GIS)
  • Balanced portfolio management (supply/demand/usage)
    • Energy efficiency, DR/DSM, TOU/CPP, etc.
    • Renewables & environmental (carbon)
    • Distributed energy resources (DER)
  • Dmd response infrastructure (DRI) & “intelligent” dispatch
  • Customer satisfaction & segment service/value benefit

IntegratedSupply Portfolio Strategy

IntegratedOperations & Infrastructure Strategy

Integrated Market Development &Demand-side Strategy

Source: “New Smart Grid Technology is Anti-gridlock”, Energy Central, March 2007

legislative and environmental impacts
Legislative and Environmental Impacts
  • Senate Bill 3 mandates cooperatives generate 10 percent of their energy from renewable energy sources or through energy efficiency programs.
  • Climate change impacts
  • Carbon wildcard
slide7
UOF Example: Potential Electric Sector Carbon Reduction (EPRI’s PRISM technology capability assessment)

“5th Fuel”

DR/efficiency are key resources for “Bridging the Gap”

  • Key Assumptions:
  • Specific sequence of RD&D activities identifiable
  • RD&D supports wide-scale deployment by 2030
  • No economic or political constraints
  • Aggressive but feasible reduction targets

EIA 2007 Reference Case (Annual Energy Outlook ’07)

Source: EPRI, The Power to Reduce CO2 Emissions: The Full Portfolio, 2007 Summer Seminar

DER = Distributed energy resources (including solar)

where is technology heading
Where is Technology Heading
  • Technology integration of supply chain
    • Currently, some technology integration exist between G&T - Power Supplier(s) and G&T- Distribution Cooperatives.
    • Seamless technology integration is needed between G&T, Cooperative, and end consumers for efficiency and reliability.
    • Intelligent or smart grid technology similar to computer network is needed to maintain the future power requirements.
    • More Intelligent devices on the power network to monitor and maintain the reliability.
cooperatives have a key role
Cooperatives Have a Key Role
  • Assist with technology integration (up and down stream)
  • Provide more products/services to cooperative members
  • Play a key role in CO2 emission, energy efficiency and other green energy programs to help meet REPS requirements
new technology trends
New Technology Trends
  • Renewable energy resources e.g. solar, wind, other
  • Fuel cell technology (Microcell alternatives)
  • Home automation to allow better energy conservation and control of appliances e.g. Zigbee, WiMax, others.
  • New intelligent devices on power line and substations to provide better information during outages and increase reliability.
  • More intelligent devices means more data to store (mine) and analyze.
  • Radio Frequency ID (RFID)

Technology – Microcell Assembly

Unicell

Module

new technology trends11
New Technology Trends
  • Zigbee Enabled Devices for home use
    • Monitor and manage energy usage and conservation using Zigbee enabled devices.
    • All Zigbee enabled devices provide information to a central control panel.
    • Allows central management of lighting, heating, cooling, and other systems to improve efficiency and conserve energy.
other technology integration
Other Technology Integration
  • Service Oriented Architecture (SOA) – integration of different disjointed systems and data exchange
  • Multiprotocol Layer Switching (MPLS) – next generation intelligent network
  • Voice Over Internet Protocol (VoIP) – Utilizing IP network for voice, data, video, and other services
  • Network monitoring tools like Orion -automated notification of events e.g. interruption in network, power, computer equipment, and other services
consumer expectations of their service providers
Consumer Expectations of Their Service Providers
  • Affordable electric rates
  • Using energy more efficiently
  • Using technology to manage energy costs and better use of existing resources
questions answers
Questions / Answers

Bob Goodson

Chief Operating Officer

TSE/EMC Technologies

(919) 875-3126

bob.goodson@ncemcs.com

http://www.tseservices.com/presentations