addressing inequalities in health and wellbeing at population level n.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Addressing Inequalities in Health and Wellbeing at Population Level PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Addressing Inequalities in Health and Wellbeing at Population Level

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 31

Addressing Inequalities in Health and Wellbeing at Population Level - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 59 Views
  • Uploaded on

Addressing Inequalities in Health and Wellbeing at Population Level. HINST Associates. Redcar and Cleveland (1) . Professor Chris Bentley Chris.bentley19@gmail.com. Physiological risks High blood pressure High cholesterol Stress hormones Anxiety/depression. Well being and Health.

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'Addressing Inequalities in Health and Wellbeing at Population Level' - thuyet


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
addressing inequalities in health and wellbeing at population level

Addressing Inequalities in Health and Wellbeing at Population Level

HINST

Associates

Redcar and Cleveland (1)

Professor Chris Bentley

Chris.bentley19@gmail.com

slide2

Physiological risks

High blood pressure

High cholesterol

Stress hormones

Anxiety/depression

Well being and Health

Behavioural risks

Smoking

Poor diet

Lack of activity

Substance abuse

Risk conditions – e.g.:

Poverty

Low social status

Poor educational attainment

Unemployment

Dangerous environments

Discrimination

Steep power hierarchy

Gaps/weaknesses in

services and support

Psycho-social risks:

Isolation

Lack of social support

Poor social networks

Low self-esteem

High self-blame

Low perceived power

Loss of meaning/purpose of life

After Ronald Labonte

slide3

Health Inequalities

Different Gestation Times for Interventions

For example intervening to reduce risk of mortality in people with established disease such as CVD, cancer, diabetes

A

For example intervening through lifestyle and behavioural change such as stopping smoking, reducing alcohol related harm and weight management to reduce mortality in the medium term

B

For example intervening to modify the social determinants of health such as worklessness, poor housing, poverty and poor education attainment to impact on mortality in the long term

C

2005

2010

2015

2020

slide10

Redcar and Cleveland

Local deprivation quintile by LSOA

slide13

Multi-morbidity – the existence of several chronic health disorders in one individual – is a critical and increasing challenge for health and social services.

  • The prevalence of this problem increases with deprivation; people in deprived circumstances having the same prevalence of multi-morbidity as more affluent patients who were 10 – 15 years older (Barnett, 2012).
distribution of multiple risk behaviours
Distribution of multiple risk behaviours

Looking at combination of 4 key risk behaviours in 2008, i.e.:

Smoking; Excessive use of alcohol; Fruit and vegetable consumption;Physical exercise

  • Unskilled manual labour 3 times more likely to have all 4 risk behaviours than professionals
  • People with no qualifications 5 times more likely to have all 4 risk behaviours than those with high level qualifications

King’s Fund 2012

slide16

Reduce health inequalities and improve health and wellbeing for all

Policy Goals

Create an enabling society that maximises individual and community potential.

Ensure social justice, health

and sustainability are at heart of policies.

Policy objectives

Give every child the best start in life.

Create fair employ-ment & decent work for all.

Create and develop

healthy and environment-ally sustainable places & communities.

Strengthen the role and impact of ill-health prevention.

Enable all children, young people & adults to maximise their capabilities & control their lives.

Ensure healthy standard of living for all.

Policy mechanisms

Equality & health equity in all policies.

Effective evidence-based delivery systems.

slide17
Inequality in Early Cognitive Development of British Children in the 1970 Cohort, 22 months to 10 years

High SES

Low SES

High Q at 22m

Low Q at 22m

Source: Feinstein, L. (2003) ‘Inequality in the Early Cognitive Development of British Children in the 1970 Cohort’, Economica (70) 277, 73-97

sensitive periods in early brain development
`Sensitive periods’ in early brain development

“Pre-school” years

School years

High

`Numbers’

Peer social skills

Conceptualization

Sensitivity

Language

Habitual ways of responding

Emotionalcontrol

Vision

Hearing

Low

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

0

Years

Graph developed by Council for Early Child Development (ref: Nash, 1997; Early Years Study, 1999; Shonkoff, 2000.)

slide19
Per cent achieving 5+ A* - C grades inc Maths and English at GCSE by IDACI decile of pupil residence: England 2007

% achieving 5+ A*-C GCSEs inc Maths and English

Most

deprived

Income Deprivation Affecting Children Index (IDACI)

Least

deprived

Source: DCFS 2009

slide20

Health inequalities in Scotland

Sources : 1. Gray R, Bonellie SR, Chalmers J, Greer I, Jarvis S, Kurinczuk JJ, et al. 2009. 2. Scottish Government. Growing Up in Scotland: Health inequalities in the early years. 2010. 3. Levin KA, Davies CA, Topping GV, Assaf AV, Pitts NB. 2009.4. Scottish Government 2003.

5. Scottish Government Health Analytical Services Division 2008.

literacy and numeracy in the uk
Literacy and numeracy in the UK

Moser Report 1999

Skills for Life Survey 2011 (BIS)