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Overview to Examine Marketing and Implementation

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  1. I. Defining value and prospects What is my value-added or value proposition for a prospect? Who is likely to write a check for that value? How do I reach that buyer? Overview to Examine Marketing and Implementation

  2. II. Qualifying the buyer Can this person write a check? Is this the person whose objectives must be met? Is this the final decision maker (the “handshake test”)? Overview to Examine Marketing and Implementation (Continued)

  3. III. Establishing a relationship How can I relate to the buyer on an emotional level? What information, background, and/or techniques do I need? Am I listening for the opportunities todemonstrate value? Overview to Examine Marketing and Implementation (Continued)

  4. IV. Establishing conceptual agreement Do we agree on the business outcomes (objectives) for the project? Do we agree on the measures of success (metrics) for the project? Do we agree on the value created by meeting those objectives? Overview to Examine Marketing and Implementation (Continued)

  5. Overview to Examine Marketing and Implementation (Continued) V. Analyzing the sequence • Are our values compatible? • Is our relationship sound and trusting? • Do we have conceptual agreement? • Is implementation proceeding against established metrics? • Are results apparent and exploited? • Have I begun to seek further relationships? • Are there additions to this project which fulfill additional needs? • How can this client serve as a springboard to others?

  6. Added Value Consultant Knowledge Desired Client Condition Expertise Contacts Content Skills Behaviors Client Status Quo

  7. Peer level relationships demand: 1. Physical presence. How do you look? 2. Listening. You can’t relate or learn if you’re talking. 3. Patience. Think of the fourth sale first. 4. Value. What will you provide on the spot? 5. Focus: What is the next “yes”? 6. Guts: When do you push back? 7. Dynamic learning: How did the last visit increase your value? Making Rain

  8. The Rainmaker Attributes • Intellectual breadth • Able to discuss a wide variety of issues • Sense of humor • Able to ease tension, maintain perspective • Industry conversancy • Able to relate to and identify situational issues • Superb communication skills • Able to command a room or a meeting • Presence: Sogomi • Able to be accepted as a peer of the buyer

  9. The Rainmaker Attributes (continued) • Framing skills • Able to quickly describe problems and opportunities • Innovation • Able and willing to raise the bar, seek new paths • Resilience • Able to accept rejection and reject acceptance • Life balance • Able to view life holistically

  10. Credibility Tips • Look up the stock price • Shop the customer’s business • Talk to employees/members/customers casually • Visit the competition • Find a unique fit (Harvard Law) • Buy the product/use the service • Cite an experience (talk to the receptionist) • Drop a prior engagement into the conversation • What would you add

  11. The “Gravity” of Marketing Efforts Articles Referrals Columns Books Internet Gravity Pro Bono Products Mailings Ads and Listings Alliances Radio and TV AssociationLeadership Serendipity Newsletters Networking Branding Interviews Speaking Community Service

  12. Where Do These Paths Intersect? Market Need Passion Competency

  13. Corporate Buyers • Economic • Signs check • Feasibility • Approves content/style • Implementation • Runs meeting • Shadow • Agrees to talk to you

  14. Corporate Buyers Love: • High profile credibility • Value-added partnering • Unexcelled professionalism • Peer references • Guarantees • Industry/organization knowledge • Generally accepted credentials -PhD -MD -LLD -CPA -MBA

  15. “Obstacles are those frightful things you see when you take your eyes off the goal.” Hannah More

  16. “I hire unqualified credibility on substantive subjects – people who can add something to our own smarts so that we don’t breathe our own exhaust.” Marilyn Martiny, Hewlett-Packard

  17. Establish Your “Playing Fields,” i.e.: • Improving sales skills • Strategic planning • Motivation • Communication skills

  18. Incisive Marketing Approach #1 • There is a synergy in writing, speaking, and consulting based on a pragmatic client progression Unconscious competency Application Skills building Conscious competency Awareness Conscious incompetency Unconscious incompetency WRITING SPEAKING CONSULTING

  19. Conceptual Breakthrough #4 Always find the cause of successes AND failures

  20. Corporate Buyers • Economic • Signs check • Feasibility • Approves content/style • Implementation • Runs meeting • Shadow • Agrees to talk to you

  21. BYES/NO NO NO NO NO NO KR

  22. BYES YES YES YES NO NO NO NO NO KR

  23. Educational Contrarianism • Not buying?Then:  Train the seller Research prospects Craft new approach Study market Learn about competition

  24. “… Be careful with your immigration laws. We were careless with ours.” Chief Ben American Horse, Oglala Sioux

  25. 1. Provocative questions 2. Turn-around questions 3. Reflective listening 4. The echo technique Four Listening Techniques That Always Work ?

  26. “Cambiano i dischi, ma la musica e sempre quella.” Italian saying

  27. Fee and Commitment Self-defeating Sale Ideal Sale High BuyerCommitment Indifferent Sale No Sale Low Low High Fee

  28. Criteria: VALUE-ADDED FOR CLIENT: • Discussion prior to session • Questionnaire(s) and analysis • Site visit • Custom design • Client critique and input to design • “Take-aways” provided • Recording of the session • Attendance of peripheral functions • Available for questions • Proprietary nature of material • Post-session discussions with client How many ofthese are you evenOFFERING? How much of thisvalue is includedin your fees?

  29. Forty Methods to Increase Fees 1. Establish value collaboratively with the client 2. Base fees on value, not on task 3. Never use time as the basis of your value 4. Don’t stop with what the client wants - find out what the client needs 5. Think of the fourth sale first - fees are cumulative, not situational

  30. 6. Engage the client in the diagnosis - don’t be prescriptive 7. Never voluntarily offer options to reduce fees 8. Add a premium if you personally “do it all” 9. If you’re forced to consider fee reduction, reduce value first 10. Provide options every time: the choice of “yeses” Forty Methods to Increase Fees (Continued)

  31. 11. Always provide an option that is comprehensive and over-budget 12. As early as possible, ask the QGTRIHF: “What are your objectives?” 13. Broaden objectives as appropriate to increase value 14. Ensure that the client is aware of the full range of your services 15. If something is not on your playing field, subcontract Forty Methods to Increase Fees (Continued)

  32. 16. Always ask yourself, “why me, why now, why in this manner?” 17. Determine how many options the buyer perceives other than you 18. Use proposals as confirmations, not explorations 19. When asked prematurely about fees, reply, “I don’t know” 20. If you must lower fees, seek a quid pro quo from the buyer Forty Methods to Increase Fees (Continued)

  33. 21. Do not accept troublesome, unpleasant, or suspicious business 22. When collaborating or subcontracting, use objective apportionment 23. Any highly-paid employee must bring in new business, not merely deliver 24. Seek out new economic buyers laterally during your projects 25. It is better to do something pro bono than to do it for a low fee Forty Methods to Increase Fees (Continued)

  34. 26. Fees have nothing to do with supply and demand, only with value 27. If you are unaware of current market fee ranges, you’re undercharging 28. Psychologically, higher fees create higher value in the buyer’s mind 29. Value can include subjective as well as objective measures 30. Introduce new value to existing clients to raise fees in these accounts Forty Methods to Increase Fees (Continued)

  35. 31. Do not accept referral business on the same basis as the referent 32. When forced into phases, offer partial rebates to guarantee future business 33. At least every two years, consider jettisoning the bottom 15% of business 34. Start with payment terms maximally beneficial to you every time 35. Offer incentives for one-time, full payments Forty Methods to Increase Fees (Continued)

  36. 36. Never accept payment subject to conditions to be met upon completion 37. Focus on improvement, not problem solving 38. Provide proactive ideas, bench marking, best practices from experience 39. Practice stating and explaining your fees 40. Always be prepared to walk away from business Forty Methods to Increase Fees (Continued)

  37. Bio Testimonials Brochure Client list Reference list Articles Interviews Audio tape Topics/formats Photo Ad reprints Product info Affiliations/memberships Credentials Cover letter Press Kit Content

  38. Publicity and Use of Media: Six Areas of Focus • Radio and television • TV and radio interview reporter • AFTRA • Local talk shows • Public television • Avoiding the hucksters

  39. Publicity and Use of Media: Six Areas of Focus (Continued) • Print • Yearbook of experts, authorities, and spokespersons • Press releases • White papers • Brochures • Letterhead

  40. Publishing Commercially-published books Self-published books Audio cassettes Audio albums Publicity and Use of Media: Six Areas of Focus (Continued)

  41. Speaking Trade associations Local chapters Company conferences Schools and extension courses Public conferences and seminars Bureaus Publicity and Use of Media: Six Areas of Focus (Continued)

  42. Internet Web sites and their absolute requirements Search engine listings Electronic newsletters Using e-mail to accelerate responses Consultant “malls” and linked sites Publicity and Use of Media: Six Areas of Focus (Continued)

  43. Community service General pro bono work Fund-raisers and charities Service and professional clubs Civic involvement The leverage of leadership Publicity and Use of Media: Six Areas of Focus (Continued)

  44. “Obstacles are those frightful things you see when you take your eyes off the goal.” Hannah More

  45. Top ten reasons1. You always deal with the principal2. Our overhead is very low, hence, our fees reflect that3. We are immediately responsive4. Our approach is tailored to need, not “off the shelf”5. You aren’t paying our people to learn the consulting business Why Size Does Not Matter:

  46. Top ten reasons (continued) 6. There are no conflicting priorities from dozens of other clients 7. We can sign non-disclosure, non-compete and other documents readily8. Attendant expenses will be less 9. We need you as much as you need us 10. It’s about value and results, not quantity and size Why Size Does Not Matter:

  47. The Range of Interventions Independent Expert Exemplar Collaborator High Proactive Advisor Counselor Instructor Resolution of Issues (catch a fish) Low Interventionist Analyst Commentator Low High Transfer of Skills (teach to fish)

  48. Resolving Anxiety Vague Confronting Testing Self-directed Unresolvable Honest Risk taking Stressful Rational Managing Uncontrolled General Decisions Is Not Anxiety Resolution Techniques Success! Is Fear Corrections Is Not 1. 2. 3. Coping Devices Reinforces Comforts Removes 1=Counseling 2=Skills Building 3=Experiential

  49. Incisive Marketing Approach #1 • There is a synergy in writing, speaking, and consultingbased on a pragmatic client progression Awareness Unconscious competency Application Skills building Conscious competency Conscious incompetency Unconscious incompetency WRITING SPEAKING CONSULTING