social work 120 l.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Social Work 120 PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Social Work 120

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 49

Social Work 120 - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 98 Views
  • Uploaded on

Social Work 120. Valerie Southard Section 1 - Spring ‘11 Week 5 2/28/11. Collective bargaining is a process of negotiations between employers and the representatives of a unit of employees aimed at reaching agreements which regulate working conditions. True False.

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'Social Work 120' - thi


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
social work 120

Social Work 120

Valerie Southard

Section 1 - Spring ‘11

Week 5 2/28/11

slide2

Collective bargaining is a process of negotiations between employers and the representatives of a unit of employees aimed at reaching agreements which regulate working conditions.

  • True
  • False
slide3

The American colonists saw Native Americans as worthy people who needed civilizing. The betrayal of the Native Americans by the American government was the result of:

  • The Native Americans’ refusal to convert to Christianity.
  • The American settlers’ demand for land.
  • Competition with Native Americans over the selling of corn and tobacco crops.
  • The Native Americans over-hunting and depleting the food source early Americans relied upon.
today s objectives
Today’s Objectives

Describe feudal society;

Describe the Enclosure Movement;

Describe the effect of the Scientific Revolution on feudal society;

Describe the role of the church in social welfare;

Describe the impact of black death and witchcraze on society;

Describe the impact of the Protestant Reformation on social welfare;

Describe social welfare in England during the Tudor period; and

Describe the impact of the Industrial Revolution and the emergence of capitalism on social welfare.

dark ages 400 1200 ce
DARK AGES: 400-1200 CE
  • In Asia Minor, Byzantine Christianity was supplanted by Islam
    • Charity a pillar of the faith
    • Great strides in science and scholarship
    • Women’s rights wiped out
  • In Europe, a hectic transition to a new kind of civilization
    • Feudalism
    • Magna Charta
      • first document forced onto an English King by a group of his subjects (the barons) in an attempt to limit his powers by law and protect their privileges.
    • Women had little status until towards the end of the Dark Ages
feudal society
Feudal Society
  • Though resisted by peasants, feudalism emerged in exchange for protection and land use
  • Scientific revolution eventually resulted in a factory system with wage earners
  • Church
    • Corrupt and used its power to keep common people from gaining better treatment.
    • Eventual tenants of social justice and obligation for wealthy to care for the poor.
  • Private welfare
dissolution of feudalism
Dissolution of Feudalism

Church blamed for supporting beggary and undercutting profits of the elite

Cloth making achieved the status of a large-scale commercial industry

Black death and the witchcraze

poverty becomes a crime
Poverty Becomes a Crime
  • Statute of Laborers – first significant law on a national level aimed at the poor
    • Aimed to protect the interests of the commercially oriented government
  • Commercial revolution
the protestant reformation
The Protestant Reformation
  • Protestant Reformation
    • Work ethic – Work equated with spirituality
    • Thrift, frugality, asceticism valued
    • Women’s place was to serve men
  • Social Welfare and Work Morality
    • Poverty became a crime
    • Identification of poor and needy and organized ways to address the condition
the tudor period from 1485 c e
The Tudor Period: from 1485 C.E.
  • Act for Punishment of Sturdy Vagabonds and Beggars
    • Prohibited begging and casual almsgiving
  • Statute of Artificers
    • Regulated wages and hours to control labor market
  • Elizabethan Poor Laws of 1601
    • Legalized and formalized the State’s responsibility for the poor
    • Defined social welfare as part of the national labor policy
industrial revolution
Industrial Revolution

Beginnings of capitalism tied to cotton textile production (1760)

Laissez-faire policy – no interference in business policy by government

Industrial revolution

multiple choice
Multiple Choice

The Statue of Laborers - the first significant law on a national level aimed at the poor - protected ________________.

the servants 

the wage earner 

the classed laborer 

the government

multiple choice13
Multiple Choice

During the commercial revolution social welfare ___________________.

focused on housing issues for the poor. 

became adjunct to labor policy. 

became more important than labor policy. 

focused on the protection for the poor.

multiple choice14
Multiple Choice

Henry VII responded to the problems of the poor by all of the following except ______________.

putting them in the stocks 

making them indentured servants 

returning them to their place of origin 

flogging them

slide15

Private welfare dissolved during feudal society since overall responsibility for the poor rested on the church and the feudal manor.

  True False

true or false
True or False

The Elizabethan Poor Laws legalized and formalized England's responsibility for the poor.

 True

 False

true or false17
True or False

With the emergence of Capitalism. poverty was necessary to the nation's political economy.

  True

 False

dark to middle ages 400 1200 ce
Dark to Middle Ages: 400-1200 CE
  • In Asia Minor, Byzantine Christianity was supplanted by Islam
    • Charity a pillar of the faith
    • Great strides in science and scholarship
    • Women’s rights wiped out
  • In Europe, a hectic transition to a new kind of civilization
    • Feudalism
    • Magna Charta - 1215
      • first document forced onto an English King by a group of his subjects (the barons) in an attempt to limit his powers by law and protect their privileges; no arbitrary rulings
    • Women had little status until towards the end of the Middle Ages
question 9
Question 9

How did the Byzantine and Roman Churches differ in their treatment of women and the poor?

question 2
Question 2

What was feudalism?

What kinds of help for the poor did it offer?

feudal society21
Feudal Society
  • Though resisted by peasants, feudalism emerged in exchange for protection and land use
  • Church
    • Corrupt and used its power to keep common people from gaining better treatment.
    • Eventually, tenants of social justice and obligation for wealthy to care for the poor – noblesse oblige.
  • Private welfare
question 5
Question 5

How did the Scientific Revolution affect feudalism? Social welfare?

dissolution of feudalism23
Dissolution of Feudalism

Church blamed for supporting beggary and undercutting profits of the elite

Cloth making achieved the status of a large-scale commercial industry

Black death and the witchcraze

question 524
Question 5

How did the Scientific Revolution affect feudalism? Social welfare?

question 3
Question 3

What was the Enclosure Movement, and how did it affect land ownership policies in England? How did it affect employment and poverty?

question 6
Question 6

How did poverty become a crime?

poverty becomes a crime27
Poverty Becomes a Crime
  • Statute of Laborers – first significant law on a national level aimed at the poor
    • Aimed to protect the interests of the commercially oriented government
  • Commercial revolution
question 1
Question 1

What was the role of the Christian Church before the Reformation?

the protestant reformation29
The Protestant Reformation
  • Protestant Reformation
    • Work ethic – Work equated with spirituality
    • Thrift, frugality, asceticism valued
    • Women’s place was to serve men
  • Social Welfare and Work Morality
    • Poverty became a crime
    • Identification of poor and needy and organized ways to address the condition
the tudor period from 1485 c e30
The Tudor Period: from 1485 C.E.
  • Act for Punishment of Sturdy Vagabonds and Beggars
    • Prohibited begging and casual almsgiving
  • Statute of Artificers
    • Regulated wages and hours to control labor market
question 4
Question 4

What were the provisions of the Elizabethan Poor Laws of 1601, and what is their relationship to public assistance in the United States today?

elizabethan poor laws
Elizabethan Poor Laws
  • Elizabethan Poor Laws of 1601
    • Legalized and formalized the State’s responsibility for the poor
    • Defined social welfare as part of the national labor policy
industrial revolution33
Industrial Revolution

Beginnings of capitalism tied to cotton textile production (1760)

Laissez-faire policy – no interference in business policy by government

Industrial revolution

question 8
Question 8

In what ways are mercantilism, the Protestant Reformation, the Scientific Revolution, and capitalism intimately related?

multiple choice35
Multiple Choice

The Statue of Laborers - the first significant law on a national level aimed at the poor - protected ________________.

the servants 

the wage earner 

the classed laborer 

the government

multiple choice36
Multiple Choice

During the commercial revolution social welfare ___________________.

focused on housing issues for the poor. 

became adjunct to labor policy. 

became more important than labor policy. 

focused on the protection for the poor.

multiple choice37
Multiple Choice

Henry VII responded to the problems of the poor by all of the following except ______________.

putting them in the stocks 

making them indentured servants 

returning them to their place of origin 

flogging them

true or false38
True or False

Private welfare dissolved during feudal society since overall responsibility for the poor rested on the church and the feudal manor.

True

 False

true or false39
True or False

The Elizabethan Poor Laws legalized and formalized England's responsibility for the poor.

 True

 False

true or false40
True or False

With the emergence of Capitalism. poverty was necessary to the nation's political economy.

  True

 False

slide41

Social Welfare in America

State of the world at the time of the discovery of the New World was the basis for the political economy of the US

slide42

Indigenous People of America

Civilization paralleled Europe

slide43

European Invasion

Exploitive colonization of the New World began with the Europeans.

Native Americans mythologized, nearly exterminated

French

Spanish

Dutch

English

question 344
Question 3

What were the differences in approach to life between the European invaders and Native Americans? What were the bases of social welfare among Native American?

question 10
Question 10

What were the differences in approach to Native American between the Dutch, Spanish, English, and French invaders?

What values supported the differences?

slide46

Work in Early North American

  • Indentured labor
    • First kind of labor pool
    • Intended to work the hard work of the New World
question 547
Question 5

How did indenture and slavery differ, and how did those differences set patterns for racism based on color?

slavery in america
Slavery in America
  • Profitable to own slaves
  • With slavery came racism
    • Laws that explicitly excluded black people from protections
    • Laws that made it impossible for slaves to gain freedom
    • Laws that addressed revolt by slaves
    • Laws that encouraged slave trade
    • Punishment for interracial marriage
question 449
Question 4

What were the differences between slavery in North American and slavery in South America?