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Implementation Guide. It’s a PROCESS not a training EVENT !. What quantitative evidence doesn’t tell you…. How are we doing right NOW? How will I know if we need to change course? What do I need to tell my teachers to do between now and…?

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Implementation Guide


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    1. Implementation Guide It’s a PROCESS not a training EVENT!

    2. What quantitative evidence doesn’t tell you… • How are we doing right NOW? • How will I know if we need to change course? • What do I need to tell my teachers to do between now and…? • How is the system functioning on a day to day basis? • What evidence suggests that we are on the right track? As good as the quantitative indicators are, they only tell part of the picture; the END result!

    3. Successful Implementation Requires: • Systemic thinking with a common vision, mission, and set of beliefs, • The willingness to confront the brutal facts, • Active Leadership, • A long term commitment that begins with a 2 year plan, • Culture conducive to a Professional Learning Community, • Time!

    4. The CSCOPE Rubric The performance continuum for each of the indicators. Level 5 is where it’s at!

    5. 0.07 STANDARDS: TEKS/NATIONAL Through professional dialogue in a PLC, teachers continually articulate current state and national standards, their structure, and differentiate between cognitive and content expectations. Our Goal

    6. CURRICULUM: VADs (Vertical Alignment Documents) Through professional dialogue in a PLC, teachers continually look for and identify student achievement gaps by reflecting on data, the specificity from the VADs, and connect gaps to resources and instruction across grade bands. Our Goal

    7. CURRICULUM: YAG (Year at A Glance) Through professional dialogue in a PLC and the YAG, teachers are able to reconcile the course sequence to the district calendar and ensure that essential TEKS and standards are mastered at appropriate times. Our Goal

    8. CURRICULUM: IFDs (Instructional Focus Documents) Through professional dialogue in a PLC, teachers routinely identify and reconcile instructional discrepancies within the context of a unit of instruction by examining the specificity on the IFD. Our Goal

    9. INSTRUCTION: Assessment (Unit Assessments and PIs) Through professional dialogue in a PLC, teachers devise and use a variety of common assessments including Performance Indicators, Unit Tests, and Facilitation Questions to not only measure learning but shape instructional practices. Our Goal

    10. INSTRUCTION: Design/Delivery Through professional dialogue in a PLC, teachers evaluate and calibrate resources to design constructivist lessons that meet the specificity and Performance Indicators on the IFD. Our Goal

    11. Where do we go from here? Coaching TeachersandAdministrators:

    12. TEKS Framework Module Division of Instructional Support Curriculum, Instruction and Assessment

    13. What is my level of implementation of the TEKS?

    14. TEKS Format Strand Knowledge and Skills Statement Student Expectation

    15. 1.01

    16. Notice: From the strand to the knowledge and skills statement to the student expectation, the information changes from general to more specific..

    17. Level 5 Processes and Tools TEKS Exploration

    18. Through professional dialogue in a PLC, teachers continually articulate current state and national standards, their structure, and differentiate between cognitive and content expectations. Our Goal

    19. The TEKS Landscape How are the TEKS distributed across my grade level/course?

    20. 1.02 & 1.03

    21. 1.02 & 1.03 In the first column, record the strands for the content area.

    22. In this column, record the number of knowledge and skills statements for each strand.

    23. In this column, record the number of student expectations for each strand.

    24. 1.03 Your Turn! Using the TEKS for another grade level and/or subject complete a TEKS Recording Document.

    25. Debriefing the TEKS Landscape How many strands are represented in your grade level/course? How many knowledge and skills statements are represented per strand? How many student expectations are in a strand? Do they vary in number? If so, what might that imply? How does the above knowledge help in the understanding of the grade/course?

    26. Exploring Cognitive and Content Expectations What’s the difference?

    27. Cognitive and Content Expectations • Cognitive • The level at which students are expected to perform in order to adequately meet the standard. • Determined by the verbs used in both the knowledge and skills statements and student expectation(s). • Content • The content items for which students must demonstrate understanding at the appropriate cognitive level in order to adequately meet the standard.

    28. 1.04 & 1.05

    29. In the first column, record the identifying number of the knowledge and skills statement.

    30. In the second column, record the identifying number and letter for the student expectation(s).

    31. In the third column, determine the cognitive level of the TEKS by listing the verbs from the knowledge and skills and student expectations.

    32. In the fourth column, list the content items that students mustdemonstrate at the cognitive levels listed in the previous column.

    33. 1.05 Your Turn! Using the TEKS for another grade level and/or subject complete a TEKS Exploration Tool.

    34. Debriefing Cognitive and Content Expectations From the cognitive expectation’s column, what determines the level of rigor and why is this important? What is the importance of knowing the content expectations?

    35. Vertical Alignment/TEKS Clarification Document Study The Guidelines for Your Lane

    36. What is my level of implementation of the Vertical Alignment Document?

    37. How are the Vertical Alignment Documents Grouped? • English Language Arts and Reading • K – 2nd • 3rd – 5th • 6th – 8th • English I – English IV

    38. How are the Vertical Alignment Documents Grouped? • Mathematics • K – 2nd • 3rd – 5th • 6th – 8th • Clarification Documents • Algebra I • Algebra II • Geometry • Math Models • Pre-Calculus

    39. How are the Vertical Alignment Documents Grouped? • Science • K – 2nd • 3rd – 5th • 6th – 8th • Clarification Documents • Integrated Physics and Chemistry • Biology • Chemistry • Physics • Environmental Science

    40. How are the Vertical Alignment Documents Grouped? • Social Studies • K – 3rd • 4th and 7th (Texas History) • 5th, 8th and United States History • 6th, World Geography • Clarification Documents • Economics • Government • World History

    41. 2.02

    42. In this example, the strands are written into the knowledge and skills statement.

    43. This model of an ELA Vertical Alignment Document shows an example of a knowledge and skills statement that spans the four high school English courses.

    44. In this example, STAAR Readiness and Supporting Standards are identified.

    45. Specificity Specificity determines the rigor and complexity of the content that must be provided through the instruction.

    46. Cognitive Specificity - Verbs from the knowledge and skills statement as well as the student expectation are highlighted to direct teachers to the level at which students should be performing.