walkthroughs adapted from the chicago public schools november 2003 n.
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WALKTHROUGHS Adapted from the Chicago Public Schools November 2003

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  1. WALKTHROUGHSAdapted from the Chicago Public Schools November 2003 Johns Hopkins University School of Professional Studies in Business and Education 2006

  2. What is a walkthrough? • A strategy for improving instruction • A “snapshot” of teaching and learning across the school • A focused and informative process • A public process • An overview of a focused, pre-selected topic • May be done by an individual or a group… Johns Hopkins University School of Professional Studies in Business and Education 2006

  3. A walkthrough is not … • Evaluative • An “I got you!” • Finger pointing • Critical • Disruptive • An observation… Johns Hopkins University School of Professional Studies in Business and Education 2006

  4. A Four Step Process • A pre-briefing • The walk: 5-10 minutes per room • A debriefing • Feedback Johns Hopkins University School of Professional Studies in Business and Education 2006

  5. Prior to Walkthroughs … • Information is disseminated and discussed. • Staff is fully in-serviced on the process. • Trust has been developed. • All questions to be used have been clarified. • Teams have been selected. • Forms to be used during visits have been developed. Johns Hopkins University School of Professional Studies in Business and Education 2006

  6. Step 1 - The Pre-Brief • Does the faculty understand the process? • Have articles been distributed to faculty? • If a group, who will participate? What roles will they assume? • What is the focus question? • Which classrooms will be visited? • What questions will be asked of students? Johns Hopkins University School of Professional Studies in Business and Education 2006

  7. Step 2 - The Walk • Scan the classroom environment- questions pre-determined • Observe the teacher- what to look for pre-determined • Observe the students- what to look for pre-determined • Question students- questions set prior to entry. Johns Hopkins University School of Professional Studies in Business and Education 2006

  8. Step 3 - Debrief • How do we move staff forward? • Are there steps toward a long term PD plan for the staff? • Were there any problems that need to be addressed immediately? • Are there any emergent trends? • Are students learning? How do you know? • What is your evidence? Johns Hopkins University School of Professional Studies in Business and Education 2006

  9. Step 4 - Feedback • How and when will you provide the feedback? (Should be pre-determined) • Deliver feedback in a manner that is meant to improve instruction. • Use “I wonder statements.” • Send an e-mail or quick note when possible. • Use specific evidence. Johns Hopkins University School of Professional Studies in Business and Education 2006

  10. The Individual Walkthrough …Adapted from Ginsberg and Murphy • Conducted in some manner by an administrator every day for at least twenty minutes • Includes frequent, unscheduled, short visits to walk the entire room • Fosters focused, reflective, and collaborative adult learning • Provides teachers with welcome opportunities for feedback and discussion … Johns Hopkins University School of Professional Studies in Business and Education 2006

  11. The Benefits of Individual Walkthroughs • Administrators become familiar with the school’s curriculum and teacher’s instructional practices. • Administrators can gauge the climate of a school. Are students engaged? • Administrators establish themselves as school leaders and instructional mentors, influencing teaching, learning, and ongoing school renewal. • Students see that both administrators and teachers value instruction and learning. Johns Hopkins University School of Professional Studies in Business and Education 2006

  12. The Individual Observer’s Questions • Is there a clear academic focus? Can I ascertain the purpose and expectations of the lesson when I enter the classroom, through what I see on the walls or hear from the teacher or students? • What is the level of student engagement? In general, is the movement, sound, or silence productive? Is student engagement high, medium, or low? What specific behaviors indicate the level of engagement? Johns Hopkins University School of Professional Studies in Business and Education 2006

  13. The Individual Observer’s Questions (cont’d) • What do the walls of the classroom show? • Exemplary work • Specific scoring criteria, standards, benchmarks • Writing samples with scoring rubrics • Helpful information on… • Classroom agreements • Other… Johns Hopkins University School of Professional Studies in Business and Education 2006

  14. The Individual Observer’s Questions (cont’d) • How well do students understand the assignment? • What are you working on? • Why are you doing this work? • Is what you are working on interesting? • What do you do in this class if you need extra help? Johns Hopkins University School of Professional Studies in Business and Education 2006

  15. The Individual Observer’s Questions (cont’d) • Do students communicate effectively and demonstrate critical thinking skills? • Is there evidence of productive communication styles and higher order questioning? • Can students respond in ways that include personal perspectives and imaginative and thoughtful analyses of new information? Johns Hopkins University School of Professional Studies in Business and Education 2006