computer based technology caregiving for older adults l.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Computer-Based Technology & Caregiving for Older Adults PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Computer-Based Technology & Caregiving for Older Adults

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 35

Computer-Based Technology & Caregiving for Older Adults - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 132 Views
  • Uploaded on

Computer-Based Technology & Caregiving for Older Adults . National Conference Natcher Center NIH Campus Bethesda, Maryland October 2-3, 2003. Computer-Based Technology & Caregiving for Older Adults . John Rother Director Policy & Strategy. U.S. Caregiving Challenge. Give more people

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'Computer-Based Technology & Caregiving for Older Adults' - teneil


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
computer based technology caregiving for older adults

Computer-Based Technology & Caregiving for Older Adults

National Conference

Natcher CenterNIH CampusBethesda, Maryland

October 2-3, 2003

u s caregiving challenge
U.S. Caregiving Challenge
  • Give more people
  • Better care
  • For less cost
slide6

The shrinking pool of caregivers

Caregivers available

For each sick person

-

-

^

11 for 1990

10 for 2010

6 for 2030

4 for 2050

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

--

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

^

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

u s caregiving challenge7
U.S. Caregiving Challenge
  • Give more people
  • Better care
of majority who receive help it is from an unpaid family member spouse or child
Of majority who receive help, it is from an unpaid family member (spouse or child)

Figure 37

Q. Is the person who provides the help to this person with a disability or health condition paid or unpaid? Base: Those who receive help.

Q. Is the person a family member or friend or some other type of relationship? Base: Those who

receive care.

Q. What type of family member provides you with this help? Base: People who receive care from a

family member.

Source: AARP/Harris Interactive Survey of Persons 50 and Older with Disabilities, September 2002Disabilities, September 2002

most caregivers live with person helped
Most caregivers LIVE WITH person helped

Figure 38: Living Arrangements of Persons 50 and Older Who Receive Help with Daily Activities

Q. Does this person live with you? Base: People who receive help on a regular basis.

Source: AARP/Harris Interactive Survey of Persons 50 and Older with Disabilities, September 2002

family caregivers
Family caregivers
  • Where will they get information?
  • How can they partner efficiently with professional providers?
  • How can they continue their own employment?
slide12
Poll asked those with disabilities about their worries & concerns, No. 1 answer: LOSS of INDEPENDENCE and MOBILITY

Table 18

Q. Looking to the future, what are your biggest worries or concerns about having a disability or

health condition?

Source: AARP/Harris Interactive Survey of Persons 50 and Older with Disabilities, September 2002

Note: Percentages do not total 100% because of “other” responses.

slide13

If home care services are needed, 50+ with disabilities prefer own control over money and management of home care workers (vs agency control)

53

53

53

25

27

24

Table 26

Q. Home care services paid for by the government could be provided in several different ways. I’m going to describe three possible ways that the government could pay for home care services. Then I will ask you the option you would prefer if you needed these services. If you needed these services, which of these three options would you prefer? Source: AARP/Harris Interactive Survey of Persons 50 and Older with Disabilities, September 2002

the recipients of care
The recipients of care
  • How can they get information?
  • How can they stay in touch with the world outside?
  • How can they manage their own affairs?
the recipients of care15
The recipients of care
  • How can we design technology to promote better partnership among

physicians,

the caregiving team,

the patient,

and her family?

large numbers of 50 with disabilities are computer users
Large numbers of 50+ withdisabilities are computer users

Figure 53

Q. Do you personally use a computer at home, work, or in some other place such as a computer terminal at school, a library, a post office, or someplace else?

Source: AARP/Harris Interactive Survey of Persons 50 and Older with Disabilities, September 2002

VER/SOMEWHAT SEVERE

SLIGHT/MODERATE

50-64

65+

today s nursing home residents have more severe limitations
Today’s nursing home residents have MORE SEVERE limitations

Figure 20: Percent of Nursing Home Residents Age 65 and Older at Various Levels of Disability, 1984-1999

Source: Urban Institute analysis of the National Long-Term Care Survey for AARP Public Policy Institute

Which requires more monitoring

and attention

problems with quality of care persist in u s nursing homes
Problems with QUALITY OF CARE persist in U.S. nursing homes

Figure 21: Selected Quality Measures for Long-Stay Nursing Home Residents, 2002

Source: Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, Nursing Home Compare

Web site www.medicare.gov

better care computer technology a key to improved quality
Better care Computer technology a key to improved QUALITY
  • Better record-keeping, record access
    • Better-informed medical practitioners and “hands-on” caregivers
    • More accurate transfer of information
      • Prescribing
      • Diagnostic tests
      • Concurrent treatments
    • Auto-reminders of tests, procedures, medications, turning due patients
better care computer technology a key to improved quality21
Better care Computer technology a key to improved QUALITY
  • Not only in long-term care, but in hospital settings and outpatient care
better care bring computer technology into the exam room
Better care Bring computer technology into the exam room
  • Diagnostic checklists
  • Data bases of best practices
  • Computerized prescriptions, lab orders
  • Automated patient records (AMR)
  • All easy-to-use by stressed professionals
  • Plus, ability to track outcomes economically
better care extent cost of medical errors widespread
Better careExtent & cost of medical errors widespread
  • Recent IOM Report suggested that as many as 98,000 unnecessary deaths a year occur in hospitals due to medical errors
  • Many of these could be prevented with well-designed computer technology
u s caregiving challenge24
U.S. Caregiving Challenge
  • Give more people
  • Better care
  • For less cost
health spending has taken off
Health spending has taken off

7.5%

6.3%

National Health Expenditures

Percentage rise

3.8%

6 years

1 year

1 year

Real average annual growth in health spending

chronic care management key to a large segment of cost

Less cost

Chronic care management key to a large segment of cost

100%

30% of costs

for 1% of people

80

60

% Health Care Dollars Spent

40

10% of costs

for 70% of people

20

0%

20%

40%

60%

80%

100%

Percent of Population

inappropriate care adds risk and expense

Less cost

Inappropriate care adds risk and expense
  • Study done by the Chicago Midwest Business Group on Health estimated 30% of healthcare dollars are spent on inappropriate care

Reducing the Costs of Poor Quality Health Care Through Responsible Purchasing Leadership

June 2003

inappropriate care adds risk and expense28

Less cost

Inappropriate care adds risk and expense
  • Tracking and publishing outcomes improves care
  • Measuring outcomes at reasonable cost requires computerized data systems, patient records
envision an adequate health information system
Envision an adequate health information system
  • Giving consumers and providers the latest information to make informed decisions
  • Expanding consumers’ ability to participate in their own care
  • Facilitating patient-to-provider interaction
envision an adequate health information system31
Envision an adequate health information system
  • Speeding and adding accuracy to professional-to-professional consultation
  • Reminding us when to take our meds, report for tests, renew Rx’s
  • Storing for easy retrieval all the medical information in the world
concerns
Concerns:
  • Privacy issues
  • Cost to individual to participate
  • Will technology promote or impede patient-caregiver trust?
four policy recommendations
Four policy recommendations:
  • Need for national health infrastructure standards
  • Must create funding mechanism
four policy recommendations34
Four policy recommendations:
  • Must create a system that involves patients more fully in their own care
  • Formulated in a way that will support appropriate decisions
computer based technology caregiving for older adults35

Computer-Based Technology & Caregiving for Older Adults

National Conference

Natcher CenterNIH CampusBethesda, Maryland

October 2-3, 2003