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ASLI. May 2013 Anchorage, AK. Welcome. Goals for today. Deepen cognitive depth with Alaska State ELA Standards. Build understanding of concepts with formative and summative assessment with the new standards. Chalk Talk Protocol. Draw a circle in the middle of your paper

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slide1
ASLI

May 2013

Anchorage, AK

goals for today
Goals for today
  • Deepen cognitive depth with Alaska State ELA Standards.
  • Build understanding of concepts with formative and summative assessment with the new standards
chalk talk protocol
Chalk Talk Protocol
  • Draw a circle in the middle of your paper
  • Record everything you know about the ELA standards inside the circle
commitment to continuous growth and thinking with precision
Commitment to Continuous Growth and Thinking with Precision

Increases cognitive understanding through self-directed professional development.

new alaska standards
New Alaska Standards
  • Structural
    • How are standards organized
    • What is the same and different from prior standards
  • Instructional
    • What level of rigor will be required
    • How to increase student performance with new standards
    • What instructional techniques/approaches will I need to deploy
foundational skills
Foundational Skills

Jigsaw Common Core Document

  • Number off into 1-4
  • Each member read section of document
  • Record 3 most relevant pieces of information
  • Share with group in order
foundational skills1
Foundational Skills
  • Print Concepts (K – 1)
  • Phonological Awareness (K – 1)
  • Phonics and Word Recognition (K – 5)
  • Fluency (K – 5)
the ccss requires three shifts in ela literacy
The CCSS Requires Three Shifts in ELA/Literacy
  • Building knowledge through content-richnonfiction
  • Reading, writing,and speaking grounded in evidence from text, both literary and informational
  • Regular practice with complex text and its academic language
text structures
Text Structures

Informational

Narrative

Cause/Effect

Character(s)

Compare/Contrast

Setting

Problem/Conflict

Description

Events

Chronology/Sequence

Resolution/Outcomes

Problem/Solution

Theme

your turn identifying text structure
Your Turn: Identifying Text Structure

Using the information about each of the five text structures from your handout, identify the text structure of each of the passages about the Olympics in your handout.

  • Circle any signal words.
  • Think about intended purpose.
  • Underline important information.
comprehension
Comprehension

Text Structure

  • Listen for the following items:
    • Signal words
    • Low level text
    • Graphic organizers
    • Read aloud
    • Cooperative Learning (Rally Table)
explicit text structure instruction
Explicit Text Structure Instruction

1. Teacher selects appropriate texts and examples.

2. Teacher explains the task and its importance.

3. Teacher models the task.

4. Teacher and students practice the task.

5. Independent practice/application.

6. Revisit, remind, review, recheck—and repeat!

slide21

Dinoflagellates play an important role in marine ecosystems. Together with diatoms and coccolithophores, they are a major component of phytoplankton that provide food directly or indirectly many marine animals. Their flagella, mixtrophic nutrition, ability to migrate vertically in the water column and lack of independence on silicon give dinoflagellates an ecological advantage over diatoms. On the other hand, aside from predation, to which the diatoms are subjected as well, dinoflagellates are less tolerant of stormy seas. Their relatively large size and multiplated structure increase their chance of cells being torn apart.

(Introduction to Marine Biology, Karleskint Turner Small, pg 145

slide22

CAUSEWhy did it happen?

EFFECTWhat happened?

The economy of nearly every city was impacted by the flu epidemic of 1918. The workforce was paralyzed because 21-to-29 year olds suffered the greatest casualties. Essential services were on the verge of collapse since workers like firemen, nurses, and garbage collectors were too sick to come to work. New public health ordinances prohibiting public gatherings resulted in theaters, cinemas and hotels losing millions of dollars.

As a result of the unexpected high volume of deaths among the young, insurance actuarial projections were incorrect. Therefore, many insurance companies were unable to pay life insurance claims.

Adapted from ELACCSS document, Appendix c, pp. 80–81.

slide23

CAUSEWhy did it happen?

EFFECTWhat happened?

The economy of nearly every city was impacted by the flu epidemic of 1918. The workforce was paralyzed because 21-to-29 year olds suffered the greatest casualties. Essential services were on the verge of collapse since workers like firemen, nurses, and garbage collectors were too sick to come to work. New public health ordinances prohibiting public gatherings resulted in theaters, cinemas and hotels losing millions of dollars.

As a result of the unexpected high volume of deaths among the young, insurance actuarial projections were incorrect. Therefore, many insurance companies were unable to pay life insurance claims.

Adapted from ELACCSS document, Appendix c, pp. 80–81.

slide24

CAUSEWhy did it happen?

EFFECTWhat happened?

The economy of nearly every city was impacted by the flu epidemic of 1918. The workforce was paralyzed because 21-to-29 year olds suffered the greatest casualties. Essential services were on the verge of collapse since workers like firemen, nurses, and garbage collectors were too sick to come to work. New public health ordinances prohibiting public gatherings resulted in theaters, cinemas and hotels losing millions of dollars.

As a result of the unexpected high volume of deaths among the young, insurance actuarial projections were incorrect. Therefore, many insurance companies were unable to pay life insurance claims.

Adapted from ELACCSS document, Appendix c, pp. 80–81.

slide25

CAUSEWhy did it happen?

EFFECTWhat happened?

The economy of nearly every city was impacted by the flu epidemic of 1918. The workforce was paralyzed because 21-to-29 year olds suffered the greatest casualties. Essential services were on the verge of collapse since workers like firemen, nurses, and garbage collectors were too sick to come to work. New public health ordinances prohibiting public gatherings resulted in theaters, cinemas and hotels losing millions of dollars.

As a result of the unexpected high volume of deaths among the young, insurance actuarial projections were incorrect. Therefore, many insurance companies were unable to pay life insurance claims.

Adapted from ELACCSS document, Appendix c, pp. 80–81.

slide26

CAUSEWhy did it happen?

EFFECTWhat happened?

The economy of nearly every city was impacted by the flu epidemic of 1918. The workforce was paralyzed because 21-to-29 year olds suffered the greatest casualties. Essential services were on the verge of collapse since workers like firemen, nurses, and garbage collectors were too sick to come to work. New public health ordinances prohibiting public gatherings resulted in theaters, cinemas and hotels losing millions of dollars.

As a result of the unexpected high volume of deaths among the young, insurance actuarial projections were incorrect. Therefore, many insurance companies were unable to pay life insurance claims.

Adapted from ELACCSS document, Appendix c, pp. 80–81.

morning concept attainment
Morning Concept Attainment
  • Review your Chalk Talk chart
  • Add to your Chalk Talk

outside of your circle

slide29

Shift #2:Reading, Writing, and Speaking Grounded in Evidence From Text, Both Literary and Informational

slide30
What makes Casey’s experiences at bat humorous?

What can you infer from King’sletter about the letter that he received?

“The Gettysburg Address” mentions the year 1776. According to Lincoln’s speech, why is this year significant to the events described in the speech?

Text Dependent

Not Text Dependent

In “Casey at the Bat,” Casey strikes out. Describe a time when you failed at something.

In “Letter From Birmingham Jail,” Dr. King discusses nonviolent protest. Discuss, in writing, a time when you wanted to fight against something that you felt was unfair.

In “The Gettysburg Address” Abraham Lincoln says the nation is dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal. Why is equality an important value to promote?

what text dependent questions are
WHAT TEXT-DEPENDENT QUESTIONS ARE:
  • Questions that can only be answered with evidence from the text
  • Can be literal but can also involve analysis, synthesis, evaluation
  • Focus on word, sentence and paragraph as well as larger ideas, themes or events
  • Focus on difficult portions of text in order to enhance reading proficiency
why text dependent questions or why not go outside the text
WHY TEXT-DEPENDENT QUESTIONS? or, WHY NOT GO OUTSIDE THE TEXT?
  • More time inside the text less outside
  • Going outside the text privileges those who have that experience
  • It is easier to talk about our experiences than to analyze the text
  • These are college and career standards
close reading
Close Reading
  • Reading with pen (or pencil) in hand – taking notes as you go through the text
  • Reading, and rereading, and rereading again to uncover layers of meaning
  • Asking and answering questions about the text – especially how and why
close reading of complex text
Close Reading of Complex Text
  • Great books (challenging books) need to be read and reread
  • Each reading should accomplish a separate purpose
    • 1st purpose: Allows the reader to determine what a text says
    • 2nd purpose: Allows a reader to determine how a text works
    • 3rd purpose: Allows the reader to evaluate the quality and value of the text (and to connect the text to other texts)

—Timothy Shanahan

a guide to creating text dependent questions for close analytic reading
A Guide to Creating Text-Dependent Questions for Close Analytic Reading

Discuss how the process for generating questions may be different than past classroom practices.

why text dependent questions or why not go outside the text1
WHY TEXT-DEPENDENT QUESTIONS? or, WHY NOT GO OUTSIDE THE TEXT?
  • More time outside the text less inside
  • Going outside the text privileges those who have that experience
  • It is easier to talk about our experiences than to analyze the text
  • These are college and career standards
basal alignment project

BASAL ALIGNMENT PROJECT

Council of the Great City Schools

and

Student Achievement Partners

Cleveland, Ohio

September 13-14, 2012

what they did not do
WHAT THEY DID NOT DO
  • Will not alter sections on phonics, spelling, grammar, word study, science and social studies connections
  • Will not be supporting any supplemental texts such as leveled readers.
  • However aligned questions and culminating tasks will take longer
features of complex text
Features of Complex Text
  • Subtle and/or frequent transitions
  • Multiple and/or subtle themes and purposes
  • Density of information
  • Unfamiliar settings, topics, or events
  • Lack of repetition, overlap, or similarity in words and sentences
  • Complex sentences
  • Uncommon vocabulary
  • Lack of words, sentences, or paragraphs that review or pull things together for the student
  • Longer paragraphs
  • Any text structure that is less narrative and/or mixes structures
slide41

•Word length

•Word frequency

•Word difficulty

•Sentence length

•Text length

•Text cohesion

  • Levels of meaning
  • •Levels of purpose
  • •Structure
  • •Organization
  • •Language conventionality
  • •Language clarity
  • •Prior knowledge demands

•Motivation

•Knowledge and experience

•Purpose for reading

•Complexity of task assigned and questions asked regarding text

scaffolding complex text
Scaffolding Complex Text

The standards require that students read appropriatelycomplex textat each grade level, independently (Standard 10).However, there are many ways to scaffold student learning, including:

  • Allowing for multiple readings of the same text
  • Read Aloud
  • Chunking a text (taking a little at a time)

Provide support while reading, rather than before.

what have we covered
What have we covered?
  • Awareness Phase
    • Standards Awareness
  • Transition Phase
    • Foundational Skills
    • Informational Text
    • Text Structure with informational text
    • Multiple Rereads
    • Basal Alignment Project
    • Complex text
what have we covered1
What have we covered?
  • Awareness Phase
    • Standards Awareness
  • Transition Phase
    • Foundational Skills
    • Informational Text
    • Text Structure with informational text
    • Multiple Rereads
    • Basal Alignment Project
transition
Transition…

Moving from my knowledge to supporting staff in the transition

team time 2 assessing the phases
Team Time #2Assessing the Phases…

Awareness Transition Implementation