Download
king s college london school of medicine the first two years of mbbs n.
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
King’s College London School of Medicine The first two years of MBBS PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
King’s College London School of Medicine The first two years of MBBS

King’s College London School of Medicine The first two years of MBBS

255 Views Download Presentation
Download Presentation

King’s College London School of Medicine The first two years of MBBS

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript

  1. King’s College London School of Medicine The first two years of MBBS Despo Papachristodoulou October 2011

  2. King’s College London School of Medicine and associated District General Hospitals

  3. The standard programme • 5 Years • 5 Phases • Progression from studying medical science – clinical skills – medical practice In addition: GPEP programme 4 years (graduate/professional entry programme) EMDP programme 6 years (extended medical degree programme)

  4. King’s curriculum professionalism knowledge • 2 years integrated science & clinical • 2 years attachments in clinical areas • 1 year “student house officer” attachments skills

  5. How did we get here? • St Thomas’s • Disciplines • UMDS 1983 ( St T and Guy’s) • Systems • King’s 1998 • phase 1 and phase 2 (scenarios)

  6. 336 5 year entrants 34 Oxbridge 50 EMDP Phase 1 Phase 2 28 GPEP Phase 2 Phase 3 444 Phase 4 Phase 5

  7. The first two years YEAR ONE Phase 1 Phase 2 12 weeks getting started First 12 scenarios, integrated learning with a clinical context YEAR TWO Phase 2 Next 23 scenarios

  8. Core and student selected components • The course consist of • ‘core’ material which is common for all students • Student selected components which vary in format

  9. Phase One • Overview: • Phase 1 runs over a single term. • It provides a platform of : • knowledge • skills • attitudes • that will enable students to progress to the clinical scenario-based part of the course that constitutes the rest of Year 1 and all of Year 2

  10. Summary: Systems covered in phase 1: Cardiovascular, Respiratory, Nervous, Musculoskeletal, Gastrointestinal, Renal, Immunology, Statistics, Psychology, Sociology, Ethics. Early patient contact opportunities in clinical attachments Development of professional skills and attitudes In a multidisciplinary inte-professional education programme.

  11. Using lectures as a guide: • Cell biology 21 • Anatomy 18 • Immunology 6 • Biochemistry/ metabolism 8 • Microbiology 2 • Pathology/histopathology 5 • Pharmacology 5 • Psychology /sociology/ethics/stats 10

  12. Phase 2 • Phase 2 runs over a year and a half and allows the promotion of understanding between normal structure and function and their interrelationships. • It also continues to extend training in professionalism: communication skills, attitudes and behaviours as well and teaching basic clinical skills.

  13. Summary: • 35 weekly clinical scenarios • a variety of learning sessions including: • lectures, • small group teaching • workshops, • student presentations • clinical attachments in hospital and community settings

  14. Clinical aspects linked to basic medical science • The clinical scenarios • Practical classes e.g. Blood pressure, ECG, lung function tests, nerve conduction velocity, hearing and visual field • Communication skills with simulated patients • Self directed learning • Attachments to primary care centres (general practice) • Hospital visits

  15. Content of phase 2 • Scenarios cover the topics: • Cardiovascular and respiratory systems • Gastrointestinal and renal systems • Metabolism and Nutrition • Musculoskeletal system • Endocrinology • Fertility and reproduction • Head and Neck Anatomy • Neuroscience • Genetics • Infections • Scenarios given a patient’s name and condition

  16. Scenario title examples • Sanjay’s malaise; is it influenza? • Wilma’s woeful wrist • Diana’s diarrhoea • Sheila’s sore shoulder • Harold’s painful hip • Donna’s diabetes • Silly? Easy for students to remember

  17. First two years: weekly clinical scenarios Practical skills lectures Self-directed learning Clinical scenarios tutorials dissection prosection interprofessional learning communication, ethics patient contact = clinical component

  18. Example of a clinical scenario in one week Histology of blood Dissection of thorax In phase one Clinical problem: ‘John has chest pain’ Professor of Cardiology Problem solving workshop Co-arctation Lectures: The cardiac cycle 2 Blood cells, haemopoiesis Atherosclerosis Embolism and infarction Heart disease pharmacology 2 Tutorial on CVS physiology Problem solving workshop Diseased and healthy heart Tutorial on CVS pharmacology Clinical problem debrief /summing up Professor of Psychology Clinical skills Blood pressure ECG GP or hospital visit

  19. Example of a clinical scenario in one week Clinical problem: ‘weight loss and obesity Clinician from IT Presentation of Patient with Crohn’s Problem solving workshop Regression and correlation Lectures: Energy balance and body weight Macronutrients PEM Vitamins Minerals Lipid synthesis and transport/ hyperlipoproteinaemias Integration of metabolism Diabetes mellitus Eating disorders Stats: regression and correlation Problem solving workshop: metabolic syndrome Clinical problem debrief /summing up IT clinician/ biochemist

  20. Another example of a clinical scenario in one week (YEAR TWO) Clinical problem: ‘Donna and Tony have diabetes’ Introduction by Professor of Diabetology PSW insulin therapy Clinical epidemiology tutorial randomised control trials Lectures: Diagnosis and classification Insulin secretion Insulin action and insulin resistance Therapeutic use of insulin Pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes Pathophysiology of symptoms of diabetes Randomised control trials Monitoring control in diabetes Hyperglycaemic emergencies Pharmacology of type 2 diabetes Metabolic syndrome and obesity Diabetic complications PSW hypoglycaemia Clinical skills communication skills Explaining and exploring Living with Diabetes Hospital visit Diabetic Centre CAL session Case history and management Scenario debrief: What is new in diabetes Professor of Diabetology

  21. Self directed learning The clinical skills centre allows students to practise their practical skills

  22. Medicine in the community: year 1 aims • Orientate students in clinical environment • Direct experience of working with patients • Set context for basic science • Encourage reflection • Encourage self-directed learning • Develop professionalism

  23. Community: year 2 aims • To be able to take a patient history • To understand issues involved in access to healthcare

  24. Assessment : Year one MB BS Part 1 is a Module consisting of two main components, which are weighted as follows: • End of Year Examinations 80 % • In-Course Assessment (ICA) 20 %

  25. The end of year examination component consists of three units, which are weighted as follows: Examination Assessment Duration(hours) % of final mark 1 Phase 1 3 34 2 Scenarios 1-7 2 23 3 Scenarios 8-13 2 23 total 80 1-7 cardiovascular and respiratory 8-13 gastrointestinal, renal , nutrition and metabolism Students must pass all three written examinations One further attempt is possible

  26. Assessment Year 2 • MB BS Part 2 is a Module consisting of two main components, which are weighted as follows: • End of Year Examinations 82 % • In-Course Assessment (ICA) 18 %

  27. The end of year examination component consists of four units, which are weighted as follows: • Examination Duration(hours) % of final mark • Scenarios 14-23 3 28 • Scenarios 24-32 3 28 • Scenarios 33-36 1.5 14 • OSCE 12 total 82 14-23 musculoskeletal, endocrinology 24-32 head and neck, neuroscience 33-36 genetics, infections Students must pass all three written papers and the OSCE One further attempt is possible

  28. Objective Structured Clinical Examination Examines skills, knowledge and understanding in clinical situations It is a minimum competence exam OSCE

  29. History taking Practical skills Communication skills including sensory awareness Living Anatomy Each OSCE has a mix of:

  30. Evaluation: looking at • Scenario format • Clinical experience • examinations

  31. Student evaluation from end of year questionnaires (2010-11) • Presenting the basic science material in scenario format made it interesting • Strongly agree 60% • Agree 33% • Neutral 6% • Disagree 1% • Strongly disagree 0%

  32. Student evaluation from end of year questionnaires (2010-11) • Presenting the basic science material in scenario format made it interesting • Strongly agree 60% • Agree 33% • Neutral 6% • Disagree 1% • Strongly disagree 0%

  33. Student evaluation 09-10 • Presenting the basic science material in scenario format helped learning • Strongly agree 53% • Agree 43% • Neutral 2% • Disagree 1% • Strongly disagree 1%

  34. Student evaluation 10-11 • Presenting the basic science material in scenario format helped learning • Strongly agree 55% • Agree 33% • Neutral 8% • Disagree 3% • Strongly disagree 1%

  35. Student evaluation 10-11 • I found the clinical sessions in hospital and general practice interesting • Strongly agree 28% • Agree 49% • Neutral 17% • Disagree 4% • Strongly disagree 1%

  36. Evaluation 10-11 • The end of year examinations were : • Too difficult 36% • About the right level of difficulty 64% • Too easy 1%

  37. Strengths of our course • Scenario format of teaching. (strong student feedback, frequently cited as one of the best features ) • Learning in the community • The relevance of basic science to clinical medicine is made obvious.

  38. Weaknesses • Huge amount of organisation needed to allocate 850 students in 3 hospitals and primary care centres • Too many lectures. • Timetable loses flexibility

  39. If you are using specialist teachers (clinical) • make sure they appear on the day • If the member of staff changes, ensure that any new presentation follows the aims of the session. Any ‘innovation’ should be agreed by the MEC • Make sure that the specialist does not teach his specialty but uses it to demonstrate the importance and relevance of basic science in medicine

  40. Tips • Do not start a scenario on a Monday