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A presentation facilitated by: Bethany Sills Leslie Frassel Thomas Blashaw PowerPoint Presentation
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A presentation facilitated by: Bethany Sills Leslie Frassel Thomas Blashaw

A presentation facilitated by: Bethany Sills Leslie Frassel Thomas Blashaw

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A presentation facilitated by: Bethany Sills Leslie Frassel Thomas Blashaw

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  1. ‘Should I use a computer-assisted career guidance system?’ It depends on where your career decision making difficulties lie A presentation facilitated by: Bethany Sills Leslie Frassel Thomas Blashaw Gati, I., Saka, N., Krausz, M. (2001). ‘Should I use a computer-assisted career guidance system?’ It depends on where your career decision-making difficulties lie. British Journal of Guidance and Counseling, 29(3), 301-321.

  2. Outline of our Presentation • The authors’ hypothesis • What is the the PIC model? • What are CACG’s? • The Experiment • The Results • What did we find interesting? • What we find debatable? Gati, I., Saka, N., Krausz, M. (2001). ‘Should I use a computer-assisted career guidance system?’ It depends on where your career decision-making difficulties lie. British Journal of Guidance and Counseling, 29(3), 301-321.

  3. 1. The Author’s Hypothesis • Gati, Ska, and Krausz hypothesized that “the severity of difficulties varies among people who are at different stages of their career decision-making process, and that using computer-assisted career guidance systems (CACG’s) reduces individuals career decision-making difficulties” (302). Gati, I., Saka, N., Krausz, M. (2001). ‘Should I use a computer-assisted career guidance system?’ It depends on where your career decision-making difficulties lie. British Journal of Guidance and Counseling, 29(3), 301-321.

  4. The PIC Model • In order to test their hypothesis the author’s first needed assess the different stages of the career decision-making process • The PIC model includes the three main stages of the career decision making process: • Prescreening stage- a collection of promising career alternatives • In-depth exploration stage– a collection of comprehensive info about each of the promising alternatives • Choice stage-ready to locate the most suitable alternative

  5. CACG’s: Computer-assisted career guidance systems • In this experiment, the following CACG’s were used: • MBCD (Making Better Career Decisions): this helped guide users through the pre-screening phase • Computerized Occupational Information (COI): offered in-depth information about careers • Higher Educational Institutions (HEI)- offers information on various majors and admissions requirements to institutions

  6. Experiment and Participants • In order to test this hypothesis, the researchers gave out a 1. questionnaire, 2. CACG’s (noted in previous slide) and 3. an evaluation on the CACG’s to 417 participants (153 male and 264 female). • The participants of the study were all recently discharged or soon to be discharged soldiers in Israel who had used a CACG at one of the Israeli Veterans Administration hospitals • They were all Caucasian and fell in the age group between 19- 27 years old (mean: 20.9). Gati, I., Saka, N., Krausz, M. (2001). ‘Should I use a computer-assisted career guidance system?’ It depends on where your career decision-making difficulties lie. British Journal of Guidance and Counseling, 29(3), 301-321.

  7. Experiment Continued:Questionnaire (CDDQ) • The first questionnaire was a Career decision making difficulties questionnaire (CDDQ) • The questionnaire included • 1. information on the subjects background (age, sex, education) and • 2. the remaining portion of the questionnaire was 30 statements on a specific difficulty that subjects rated on whether or not the statement applied to them or not • The questionnaire was used to place individuals in one of the PIC model stages

  8. Experiment Continued: CACG’s and Evaluation • As noted in a previous slide: the researchers used the following CACG’s :MBCD (Making Better Career Decisions, Computerized Occupational Information (COI) and Higher Educational Institutions (HEI) • Subjects were also asked to fill out an evaluation on the CACG’s they took and to fill out the CDDQ again

  9. Results • As anticipated, there were significant quantitative and qualitative differences in the CDDQ scores obtained among participants who were at different stages of their career decision-making processes (315). • The reduction of difficulties after using the CACG’s was statistically significant in seven of the ten career decision-making difficulty categories. • The most significant reduction was found in difficulties related to lack of information and especially in lack of information about occupations (316). • There was no reduction in difficulty of lack of motivation and external conflicts. • For lack of motivation, clients were probably already motivated and for external conflicts, clients would probably need to invest in personal counseling .

  10. What we found Interesting… • The PIC model seemed like an interesting and novel way to categorize the career decision-making process. • That individuals at the choice stage had the least difficulties. Some of us thought that the choice stage may have been more stressful. • The study found that “internal conflicts” were lower in the choice group.

  11. What we found debatable… • The PIC Model for career decision making was a newly formulated model. Is this the only model for the career decision-making process? Aren’t there other models? Also, what if this model was formed in favor of the authors intentions? • COI and HEI seem very informative. These tests do not seem commonly used, as none of us have ever heard about either of these tests before. • Computer assistance is more helpful for people who have a lack of information about careers. And less helpful for those who already know what direction they want to go in their career. • The study relied on self report (first questionnaire), and not something more objective. • The study was only done in Israel and the study only used soldiers or discharged soldiers—this can affect the study’s outcome and the study’s external validity.

  12. Questions for the class • Do you think that researchers could ever create a CACG that could ever replace one-on-one counseling? • Do you think the PIC Model is a reliable model of the career decision-making process? • How could the study have been done differently? • What would have been a more objective way to place subjects in a PIC model, other than the self-report questionnaire?

  13. Any further questions?

  14. Thank You!