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Statistics 111 - Lecture 8. Introduction to Inference. Sampling Distributions . Administrative Notes. The midterm is on Monday, June 15 th Held right here Get here early I will start at exactly 10:40 What to bring: one-sided 8.5x11 cheat sheet Homework 3 is due Monday, June 15 th

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introduction to inference

Statistics 111 - Lecture 8

Introduction to Inference

Sampling Distributions

Stat 111 - Lecture 8 - Sampling Distributions

administrative notes
Administrative Notes
  • The midterm is on Monday, June 15th
    • Held right here
    • Get here early I will start at exactly 10:40
    • What to bring: one-sided 8.5x11 cheat sheet
  • Homework 3 is due Monday, June 15th
    • You can hand it in earlier

Stat 111 - Lecture 8 - Sampling Distributions

outline
Outline
  • Random Variables as a Model
  • Sample Mean
  • Mean and Variance of Sample Mean
  • Central Limit Theorem

Stat 111 - Lecture 8 - Sampling Distributions

course overview
Course Overview

Collecting Data

Exploring Data

Probability Intro.

Inference

Comparing Variables

Relationshipsbetween Variables

Means

Proportions

Regression

Contingency Tables

Stat 111 - Lecture 8 - Introduction

inference with a single observation
Inference with a Single Observation

?

Population

Parameter: 

Sampling

Inference

Observation Xi

  • Each observation Xi in a random sample is a representative of unobserved variables in population
  • How different would this observation be if we took a different random sample?

Stat 111 - Lecture 8 - Sampling Distributions

5

normal distribution
Normal Distribution
  • Last class, we learned normal distribution as a model for our overall population
    • Can calculate the probability of getting observations greater than or less than any value
  • Usually don’t have a single observation, but instead the mean of a set of observations

Stat 111 - Lecture 8 - Sampling Distributions

inference with sample mean
Inference with Sample Mean

?

Population

Parameter: 

  • Sample mean is our estimate of population mean
  • How much would the sample mean change if we took a different sample?
  • Key to this question: Sampling Distribution of x

Sampling

Inference

Estimation

Sample

Statistic: x

Stat 111 - Lecture 8 - Sampling Distributions

sampling distribution of sample mean
Sampling Distribution of Sample Mean
  • Distribution of values taken by statistic in all possible samples of size n from the same population
  • Model assumption: our observations xi are sampled from a population with mean  and variance 2

Sample 1 of size n x

Sample 2 of size n x

Sample 3 of size n x

Sample 4 of size n x

Sample 5 of size n x

Sample 6 of size n x

Sample 7 of size n x

Sample 8 of size n x

.

.

.

Distribution

of these

values?

Population

Unknown

Parameter:

Stat 111 - Lecture 8 - Sampling Distributions

mean of sample mean
Mean of Sample Mean
  • First, we examine the center of the sampling distribution of the sample mean.
  • Center of the sampling distribution of the sample mean is the unknown population mean:

mean( X ) = μ

  • Over repeated samples, the sample mean will, on average, be equal to the population mean
    • no guarantees for any one sample!

Stat 111 - Lecture 8 - Sampling Distributions

variance of sample mean
Variance of Sample Mean
  • Next, we examine the spread of the sampling distribution of the sample mean
  • The variance of the sampling distribution of the sample mean is

variance( X ) = 2/n

  • As sample size increases, variance of the sample mean decreases!
    • Averaging over many observations is more accurate than just looking at one or two observations

Stat 111 - Lecture 8 - Sampling Distributions

slide11
Comparing the sampling distribution of the sample mean when n = 1 vs. n = 10

Stat 111 - Lecture 8 - Sampling Distributions

law of large numbers
Law of Large Numbers
  • Remember the Law of Large Numbers:
    • If one draws independent samples from a population with mean μ, then as the number of observations increases, the sample mean x gets closer and closer to the population mean μ
  • This is easier to see now since we know that

mean(x) = μ

variance(x) = 2/n 0 as n gets large

Stat 111 - Lecture 8 - Sampling Distributions

example
Example
  • Population: seasonal home-run totals for 7032 baseball players from 1901 to 1996
    • Take different samples from this population and compare the sample mean we get each time
    • In real life, we can’t do this because we don’t usually have the entire population!

Stat 111 - Lecture 8 - Sampling Distributions

distribution of sample mean
Distribution of Sample Mean
  • We now know the center and spread of the sampling distribution for the sample mean.
  • What about the shape of the distribution?
  • If our data x1,x2,…, xn follow a Normal distribution, then the sample mean x will also follow a Normal distribution!

Stat 111 - Lecture 8 - Sampling Distributions

example1
Example
  • Mortality in US cities (deaths/100,000 people)
  • This variable seems to approximately follow a Normal distribution, so the sample mean will also approximately follow a Normal distribution

Stat 111 - Lecture 8 - Sampling Distributions

central limit theorem
Central Limit Theorem
  • What if the original data doesn’t follow a Normal distribution?
  • HR/Season for sample of baseball players
  • If the sample is large enough, it doesn’t matter!

Stat 111 - Lecture 8 - Sampling Distributions

central limit theorem1
Central Limit Theorem
  • If the sample size is large enough, then the sample mean x has an approximately Normal distribution
  • This is true no matter what the shape of the distribution of the original data!

Stat 111 - Lecture 8 - Sampling Distributions

example home runs per season
Example: Home Runs per Season
  • Take many different samples from the seasonal HR totals for a population of 7032 players
    • Calculate sample mean for each sample

n = 1

n = 10

n = 100

Stat 111 - Lecture 8 - Sampling Distributions

next class lecture 9
Next Class - Lecture 9
  • Discrete data: sampling distribution for sample proportions
  • Moore, McCabe and Craig: Section 5.1
    • Binomial Distribution!

Stat 111 - Lecture 8 - Sampling Distributions