north dakota peec project n.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
North Dakota PEEC Project PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
North Dakota PEEC Project

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 16

North Dakota PEEC Project - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 94 Views
  • Uploaded on

North Dakota PEEC Project. A True Collaboration August 2-3, 2012. Presented by: Lane A. Azure 1 Acknowledgements: Robert Pieri 2 , Tim Legg 1 , Ann Vallie 3 , Marie Baker 4 , Joshua Mattes 5 , Leander McDonald 1 , Koreen Ressler 5 , Larry Henry 3 , G. Padamanabhan 2 , & Bob Woodle 4.

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

North Dakota PEEC Project


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
    Presentation Transcript
    1. North Dakota PEEC Project A True Collaboration August 2-3, 2012 Presented by: Lane A. Azure1 Acknowledgements: Robert Pieri2, Tim Legg1, Ann Vallie3, Marie Baker4, Joshua Mattes5, Leander McDonald1, Koreen Ressler5, Larry Henry3, G. Padamanabhan2, & Bob Woodle4

    2. Special ThanksNational Science Foundation • Grant No.: 1038067 • NSF Programs: • Experimental Programs to Stimulate Competitive Research (EPSCoR) • Tribal College & University Program, Special Studies And Analyses (TCUP) • Divisions: • Directorate For Education & Human Resources • Directorate for Engineering

    3. Tribal Colleges and Universities (TCUs) • TCUs were created in response to the higher education needs of American Indians and generally serve geographically isolated populations that have no other means accessing education beyond the high school level. • In 1968 the first tribally controlled college was created—and other Tribal Colleges quickly followed …United Tribes was among this group (AIHEC, 1999). • Today, there are 37 tribal colleges in the US and Canada and an approximate enrollment of 27,000 full-time and part-time students (AIHEC, 2012).

    4. Benefits of a TCU • Tribal Colleges offer more than 350 degrees and 180 vocational programs. While all give students the opportunity to earn two-year degrees, • 75 to 85 percent of Tribal College graduates go on to earn a four-year degree or become employed in the local community (WHITCU, 2000).

    5. TCU Limitations • TCUs are young institutions and do not have the benefit of longstanding endowments, support from alumni associations, or hearty investment portfolios. • Tribal colleges strive to stabilize their fiscal operating base through foundation and industry support, endowments, private donations, and fee for services (Department of Education, 2009). • Tribal colleges compete for tribal government resources and although government funding is not their only source, it is a significant source.

    6. National Science Foundation • The Tribal Colleges and Universities Program (TCUP) implementation grant represents the most recent commitment of the agency’s Directorate for Education and Human Resources to better prepare TCU students for college success (Department of Education, 2009). • First awards – September 2001 • ~$20 M

    7. TCUP ObjectiveCollaborative Research PEEC: 2+2+2+Infinity: Pipeline for Tribal Pre-Engineering to Society One of the key objectives of NSF-TCUP is to improve the quality of undergraduate STEM education through the development, adaptation and implementation of effective educational techniques and practices to enhance STEM instruction… (Monette, 2010)

    8. NSF PEECPTiPS: 2+2+2+∞ • September 2010 • Authored by NDSU • Robert Pieri • G. Padamanabhan • Goals • Establish a sustainable pre-engineering collaboration between TCU and NDSU • Output – NA Engineers • Illustrate to tribal communities the positive impacts that result… • Output – improved living conditions in tribal communities

    9. Characteristics • Partners – • Engineering Instructors • Ann Vallie (TMCC) • Marie Baker (FBCC) • Joshua Mattes (SBC) • Tim Legg (CCCC) • Robert Pieri (et al., NDSU) • Curriculum (POS) • Common • Course delivery & schedule • Bumps and bruises • IVN Delivery

    10. Curriculum

    11. 2012 NDSU PEEC: PTiPS Summer Camp STUDENT General Schedule nd 2 Week: 28 July to 1 August : Academics Math Boot Camp Computer Skills C ourse Engr. Professional Development Date SATURDAY SUNDAY MONDAY TUESDAY WEDNESDAY THURSDAY FRIDAY Time 28 July 29 July 30 July 31 July 1 August 2 August 3 August 7:30 Breakfast Breakfast Breakfast Breakfast Breakfast st st st st 8:00 1 Yr Surveying 1 Yr Surveying 1 Yr Surveying 1 Yr Surveying nd nd nd nd 2 Yr Thermodyn 2 Yr Thermodyn 2 Yr Thermodyn 2 Yr Thermodyn 9:00 Break (20) Break (20) Break (20) ??Break (20) 10:00 Free TIme 11:00 12: Lunch (45) Lunch (45) Lunch (45) Lunch (45) Lunch (45) 1:00 Travel Home 2:00 3:00 Break (20) Break (20) Break (20) Break (20) 4:00 5:00 Picnic Oak Grove Dinner (60) Dinner (60) Dinner (60) Shelter #2 6:00 Free Time F - M Sweat Educational Free TIme 7:00 Lodge options Experience after the 8:00 first degree. 9:00 Free TIme 10: Thermo class room Dolve 115 , Surveying Dolve 204 / Computer Cluster Elhy 119 / Break timing +/ - 30 Min Commitment

    12. Fall Schedule 2012

    13. Most Frequent Answers to Common Questions • What is the greatest challenge or issue you are facing in your work on two year or four-year STEM education and careers? • What is the one big idea or insight you have about increasing the potential of community colleges in STEM education and careers that you will bring to the summit? • Overcoming students’ inadequate academic preparation for STEM study. • Recruiting and retaining students in STEM education. • Creating and sustaining effective partnerships between two-year and four-year institutions. • Finding the resources to support and sustain STEM education program improvement. • Aligning STEM education with workforce demands and practices. (National Academy of Science, pp. 19-20, 2012)

    14. Next Steps for ND PEEC • “Slice” model • Incoming students’ STEM course aptitude • How do other PEEC projects compare geographically ? • Student Numbers • Sustainability

    15. Summary • Monthly meetings (site rotations face-to-face and IVN) • Numerous emails • Common Indigenous external evaluator • Common course delivery • Summer Faculty Professional Development • Summer Student Accelerated Courses & Internship • Engineers at each site • College supporting cast • Programs that feed PEEC

    16. Making Collaborations Work