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Area and Perimeter Learning Center Third Grade. Katie Willis williskb@troup.org. Table of Contents. Center Directions Think Dots Think-Tac-Toe Board Inquiry Based Learning Bloom ’ s Ball Anchor Activities Cubing Menu Planner. Area and Perimeter Learning Center Directions.

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area and perimeter learning center third grade

Area and Perimeter Learning CenterThird Grade

Katie Willis

williskb@troup.org

table of contents
Table of Contents
  • Center Directions
  • Think Dots
  • Think-Tac-Toe Board
  • Inquiry Based Learning
  • Bloom’s Ball
  • Anchor Activities
  • Cubing
  • Menu Planner
area and perimeter learning center directions
Area and Perimeter Learning Center Directions

Directions for the Learning Center:

Students will each pick a learning card. Students must choose 4 activities to complete. They must choose 2 yellow activities, 1 blue activity, and 1 green activity. When they complete their activities, they may choose another project.

Students must fill out their learning card and their choices. They will be graded according to a rubric for each chosen activity.

name date learning center activity card
Name___________Date____________ Learning Center Activity Card

Choose 2 yellow activities

Choose 1 blue activity

Choose 1 green activity

*Directions for each activity are provided

Yellow activities

Think Dots Choice 1:______________

Inquiry Based Learning Choice 2:______________

Cubing

Blue Activities

Menu Planner Choice 1:______________

Anchor Activities

Green Activities

Blooms Ball Choice 1:______________

Think Tac Toe Board

think dots

Instructional Strategy for

Differentiation

KNOW

Participant will use key principles of effective differentiation as related to ThinkDots.

Think Dots

UNDERSTAND

The practical applications and skills of ThinkDots as related strategies that support differentiated processing.

DO

Effectively create and implement ThinkDots activities.

  • WHY WOULD YOU USE
  • THINKDOTS?
  • To engage your students in idea and information processing activities.
  • To match your students learning profiles and current needs.
  • To engage your students forward on many learning continuums.
  • To identify the students readiness levels, interests, learning styles.
  • To use an ongoing assessment process.
directions for think dots

ThinkDOTS

DIRECTIONS FOR THINK DOTS
  • First Steps:
  • For each readiness level, write six activities on the pre-printed ThinkDots template should be created.
  • Use your 6 levels of Bloom intelligence levels or any of the ThinkDots statements to write a activity for each card.
  • Make the questions that use these levels that probe the specifics of your unit.
  • Keep one question opinion based—no right or wrong.
  • Second Steps:
  • Then cut each page into the six sections.
  • On the back of each card, dots corresponding to the dots on the faces of a die should be drawn on each of the six sections of the page.
  • Use the hole punch to make holes in one corner or in the top of each activity card.
  • Use a 1” metal ring to hold each set of six cards together.
  • Teacher may create an Activity Sheet to correspond to the lesson for easy recording and management.
student directions think dots
Student DirectionsThink Dots

Roll a dice. Complete the activity according to the number that you roll. For example, if you roll a 4, complete think dot #4. Record your answer on the sheet or another sheet of paper. Roll the dice three times.

Think Dot # ___

slide8

Area and Perimeter Think DotsDirections: Roll a dice. Complete the activity according to the number that you roll. For example, if you roll a 4, complete think dot #4. Record your answer on the sheet or another sheet of paper. Roll the dice three times.

Compare and contrast

The perimeter and the

Area of a rectangle that

Has a length of 7 sides

And a width of 4 sides.

Find the perimeter of a square if

each side has a value of 3 inches. Find the area.

Describe how you would

find the perimeter and

Area in problem #1.

If the perimeter of a rectangle is

16 and the area of the rectangle

Is also 16, what would each side measure?

Draw a picture of a

Rectangle. Measure

The lengths of each side.

Explain how you would

Find the area and perimeter

Of your rectangle.

Create an interesting

Word problem for finding

The area of a square

With a length of 3 sides

And a width of 6 sides.

slide9

Area and Perimeter Think DotsDirections: Roll a dice. Complete the activity according to the number that you roll. For example, if you roll a 4, complete think dot #4. Record your answer on the sheet or another sheet of paper. Roll the dice three times.

Compare and contrast

The perimeter and the

Area of a rectangle that

Has a length of 7 sides

And a width of 4 sides. Make a Venn Diagram comparing the 2.

Describe how you would

Find the perimeter and

Area in problem #1 to a first grader. Be sure to define each term.

Find the perimeter of a square if

Each side has a value of 6 inches. Find the area.

Draw a picture of a

Rectangle. Measure

The lengths of each side.

Explain how you would

Find the area and perimeter

Of your rectangle. Solve

Your problem.

Create an interesting

Word problem for finding

The area of a square

With a length of 4 sides

And a width of 7 sides.

If the perimeter of a rectangle is

16 and the area of the rectangle

Is also 16, what would each side measure?

slide10

Area and Perimeter Think DotsDirections: At your table group, take turns rolling the dice and complete the learning task from the corresponding dot. If the first roll is something you don’t want to do, you can roll a second time. It is alright if more than one person rolls the same number as each person’s response will be individual.

Compare and contrast

The perimeter and the

Area of a rectangle that

Has a length of 7 sides

And a width of 4 sides. Write a paragraph describing the similarities and differences of both.

Describe how you would

Find the perimeter and

Area in problem #1 to a first grader. Be sure to define each term. Include pictures and diagrams.

Find the perimeter of a square if

Each side has a value of 9 inches. Find the area.

Create an interesting

Word problem for finding

The area of a square. Make your own dimensions and include a picture of your drawing.

Draw a picture of a

Rectangle. Measure

The lengths of each side.

Explain how you would

Find the area and perimeter

Of your rectangle in paragraph form. Solve

Your problem.

If the perimeter of a rectangle is

16 and the area of the rectangle

Is also 16, what would each side measure?

slide11

Tic-tac-toe

Tic-tac-toe, also known as Think-tac-toe, is a differentiation tool that

offers collection of activities from which students can choose to do to demonstrate their understanding. It is presented in the form of a nine square grid similar to a tic-tac-toe board and students may be expected to complete from one to “three in a row”. The activities vary in content, process, and product and can be tailored to address different levels of student readiness, interests, and learning styles. The center square may be left open for the student to select an activity of their own.

Tic-tac-toe activities may be given to every student in the class, higher ability students for extension activities, or lower students for review and practice. Involvement in this strategy encourages independent learning. Teachers should check in with students periodically and require students to keep a log of their progress.

In place of lengthy activities, the tic-tac-toe board may also be used

with shorter, open-ended questions posed at varying levels of Blooms Taxonomy.

student directions think tac toe board
Student DirectionsThink-tac-toe Board

Take a board. Choose activities to complete on area and perimeter in a tic-tac-toe format: 3 down, 3 across, or 3 diagonally. Write your three choices down on your board. Complete your three activities. When you finish, take the papers and place them in your folder behind the tic-tac-toe board.

slide13

Area and Perimeter

Menu

Directions: Choose 4 of the above homework activities to complete each night starting on Tuesday January 8th. Make your decisions and write them below. All materials needed will be sent home to use for any of the activities in your Ziplock bag.

Tuesday’s Homework: #____ Parents please sign below saying you have seen this homework assignment form for this Wednesday’s Homework: #____ week.

Thursday’s Homework: #____

Friday’s Homework: #____

what is inquiry based learning
What is Inquiry Based Learning?

"Tell me and I forget, show me and I remember, involve me and I understand." The last part of this statement is the essence of inquiry-based learning

Inquiry implies involvement that leads to understanding.

"Inquiry" is defined as "a seeking for truth, information, or knowledge -- seeking information by questioning."

Inquiry-based learning is a research-based strategy that actively involves students in the exploration of the content, issues, and questions surrounding a curricular area or concept. The activities and assignments in an Inquiry Based Learning classroom can be designed so that students work individually or together to solve problems involving both in-class work and fieldwork.

Why use Inquiry Based Learning?

Other than increasing student motivation, one of the main reasons to think about using Inquiry Based Learning in your classroom is because it provides a means to actively involve students in the learning process. Inquiry Based Learning gives you the opportunity to help students learn the standards and objectives by having them explore a question and develop and research a hypothesis or answer. This gives students more opportunity to reflect on their own learning, gain a deeper understanding of the standards in an integrated fashion, and become better critical thinkers.

area and perimeter inquiry based learning
Area and Perimeter Inquiry Based Learning

Third grade students will complete two inquiry based activities. They will experience finding the area and perimeter before the terms are introduced to them.

Activity 1:

Students will read the word problem. They will discover the answer using the graph paper provided. Students will be able to answer the question before area and perimeter has been taught to them. They will draw each figure onto the graph paper and decide which figure is larger.

Activity 2:

Students will be provided with paper clips and square tiles. They will first measure the distance around their math book using paper clips. They will find the perimeter of their math book. We will discuss different methods they may have used to discover the answer.

Students will then use their tiles to cover their entire math book. They will count how many tiles it took to cover their book. In this way, they will find the area. We will discuss different methods they may have used to discover the answer.

*After activities have been completed, the terms area and perimeter will be applied and taught. Students will see that they have already discovered which each of them are.

student directions inquiry based learning
Student DirectionsInquiry Based Learning

Choose a task: Either the word problem with the graph paper or the measurement activity.

Word Problem

Read the word problem. Using the graph paper provided, find which play pen would be larger. Then, write how you found the answer and why you chose the particular play pen.

Measurement

Take an index card. Using tiles, estimate how many tiles it would take to go around the card. Write your estimate. Then, measure to find the exact answer. Record. Then, estimate how many tiles it would take to cover the entire index card. Write your estimate. Then, measure to see and record your answer. Write how you found your answers at the bottom place that is provided.

inquiry based learning
Inquiry Based Learning

Task

Mrs. Willis decided she was going to buy Colt a playpen. She wanted to get the largest one for him to play inside. She compared two pens. One play pen had 5 rows of 4 square units and another pen had 7 rows of 3 square units. Which play pen should Mrs. Willis buy? Use graph paper to find your answer. Write a description telling why and how you found your answer.

slide18

Directions: Estimate the number of paper clips

You think will be needed to measure the distance

Around your math book. Measure and compare.

Then, estimate the number of tiles it would take

To cover the entire cover of your math book.

Measure and compare.

Write about it: Explain how you found each of your answers:

_____________________________________________

_____________________________________________

_____________________________________________

_____________________________________________

_____________________________________________

_____________________________________________

bloom ball report
Bloom Ball Report

What is a Bloom Ball?

A Bloom Ball report is a great way for students to practice their skills and exhibit their creativity pertaining to a particular skill or unit. A Bloom’s ball is created by gluing together 12 balls that contain important information important to the concept they are studying. Students can research answers and will be able to apply higher order thinking skills when completing the project.

What is Bloom’s Taxonomy?

Bloom’s Taxonomy is a hierarchy of skills that reflects growing complexity and ability to use higher order thinking skills.

bloom s ball area and perimeter report student directions
Bloom’s Ball Area and Perimeter ReportStudent Directions

Bloom’s Ball Project: A Creative Report

Directions for completion:

I.          Carefully cut out 12 circles using the one you have been given as a template. (Each circle you cut out will be used per the instructions below.) The template is located after the directions.

II.         Before completing each of the following steps, be certain to observe where the fold lines (the chord lines on the edges of the template circle) are. Do not write or draw the assignments on the outside of these lines. You may fold the edges up at this point to remind you not to write in this area. Do NOT assemble the ball until you have completed writing on all pieces.

III.        Complete the following steps on the next page in your circles. Use one circle for each step. Be sure to number each circle to match the step you are completing.

When you are finished, cut the circles out. Place them in your folder.

bloom s ball area and perimeter bloom report
Bloom’s Ball Area and Perimeter Bloom Report

KNOWLEDGE :

Ball One:Write the title of your report: Area and Perimeter. Define the terms Area and Perimeter on this ball. Write the number 1 at the bottom of the circle and be sure to include your name on this circle.

Ball Two: Write and define four terms that we have studied throughout our unit.

COMPREHENSION

Ball Three: Explain how to find the area and perimeter of an object using your own words.

Ball Four: Illustrate a quadrilateral. Label and explain how you would find the area and the perimeter of your quadrilateral. Identify the answer.

APPLICATION

Ball Five: Produce a word problem that you could apply area and perimeter to in a real life situation.

Ball Six: Using the word problem from ball five, prepare an answer and an explanation of how you found the answer to your problem.

ANALYSIS

Ball Seven: Draw a Venn Diagram.Compare and contrast area and perimeter on your venn diagram. Include an explanation at the bottom.

Ball Eight: Which is easier to find: Area or Perimeter? Examine each and write which one is easier and why. Debate with a classmate who has a different answer.

EVALUATION

Ball Nine: Compose a song or a poem that tell how to find the area and the perimeter of a quadrilateral. Use our area and perimeter march as an example.

Ball Ten: Draw four quadrilaterals on your ball. Find the area and perimeter of each. Construct a bar graph placing the area and perimeter of each object into a graph.

CREATING

Ball Eleven: Draw a quadrilateral. Predict by looking at it which would be bigger: The area or the perimeter. Measure the sides of your quadrilateral. Write if your prediction was correct. Why or why not?

Ball Twelve: Evaluate our area and perimeter unit. What did you like about the unit? What would you have changed?

anchor activities specified on going tasks and projects
Anchor ActivitiesSpecified on-going tasks and projects
  • What are anchor activities?
  • Specified ongoing activities in which students work independently
  • Ongoing assignments that students can work on throughout a unit

“In this class we are never finished. Learning is a

process that never ends.” Carol Ann Tomlinson

  • When are anchor activities used?
  • to begin the day      2. when students complete an assignment      3. when students are stuck and waiting for help
  • ANCHOR ACTIVITIES should:
  • Be self-directed
  • Include aspects that can be completed on an ongoing basis
  • 3. Relate to the concepts and content to be learned
  • 4. Not necessarily involve other students
  • 5. Be engaging, meaningful tasks—not busywork or packets of worksheets
  • 6. Be activities that everyone in the class will have a chance to do, even if not yet finished with other work.

The purpose of an Anchor Activity is provide meaningful work for students when they are not actively

engaged in classroom activities (e.g., when they finish early, are waiting for further directions, are stumped, first enter class, or when the teacher is working with other students.)

Benefits of an Anchor Activity

_ An Anchor Activity can be used to differentiate activities on the basis of student readiness, interest or learning profile.

_ Anchor Activities allow students time to work on independent research, to work more in depth with a concept, enrich their skill development.

_ Anchor Activities can be used as a management strategy when working with small groups of students.

_ Anchor Activities can be a vehicle for making the classroom more student centered.

student directions anchor activities
Student DirectionsAnchor Activities

Take an area and perimeter anchor activity sheet. Read through the choices. Choose 4 activities to complete on the story you have just read. Write the four activities down on your student anchor contract sheet. Check off the activities as you complete them. When you are finished, place your finished products behind the anchor activity sheet in your folder.

slide26

Student Contract for Anchor Activity

Title: __________________________________

Name__________________________________

I will complete the following activities:

_____________________________

_____________________________

_____________________________

_____________________________

FINAL DUE DATE ________________

student signature ___________________

parent signature ___________________

teacher signature ___________________

Activity Completed

http://www.lcps.k12.nm.us/departments/SPED/AES/Differentiation/nagc_anchor_activities.pdf

slide27
Math Anchor ActivitiesDirections: Choose 4 Activities. Record your activities on your student answer sheet.
  • Complete area and perimeter word problem cards.
  • Look through magazines. Cut out quadrilaterals. Post them onto a blank page. Measure the sides of each quadrilateral. Using a formula, find the area and perimeter of each.
  • Using play dough, make 5 quadrilaterals. Measure each side. Find the area and perimeter of each. Draw your quadrilaterals according to scale on an index card. On the back, find the area and perimeter of each.
  • Complete think dots according to your color.
  • Write a paragraph explaining how to find the area and perimeter of an object. Be sure to define the following terms: Area, perimeter, length, width. Also, include formulas when explaining.
  • Using graph paper, design a zoo. Have different animals living in different quadrilaterals. Find the area and perimeter of each using the graph paper. Label the different places of your zoo.
  • Write 3 area and perimeter word problems you could apply to an every day situation. Use graph paper to solve your problems. Include your formulas on the graph paper.
  • Take 2 dice, 2 crayons, and graph paper. Roll the dice and draw an array on your paper. Designate one color to be the perimeter. Use that color on the outside. The other color will be the area. Use that color to shade the inside. Write a formula for finding the area and perimeter of your arrays. Fill the entire graph paper.
  • Read the book, Finding area. Solve the problems presented throughout the story. Use graph paper to solve the problems.
  • Using tiles, find the area and perimeter of an index card. Write how you found the answer to each. Record your answer to the area and perimeter on your index card.
slide28

CUBING

Cubing is a strategy that is designed to help students think about a topic or idea from many different perspectives. The tasks are placed on the six sides of a cube and often use commands that help support thinking (justify, describe, evaluate, connect, etc.). A cube itself may be rolled, or a number cube can be used for a cube with its faces numbered. The students complete the task on the side that matches the number roled or the side that ends face up. One cube can be

differentiated or there can be different cubes for different groups of students.

Benefits of Cubing:

• Cubes can be used to differentiate activities on the basis of student readiness, interest, or learning profile.

• Cubing allows students some choice and control of their tasks.

• Cubing promotes thinking skills.

Management Suggestions for Cubing:

1. Teacher meets with a small group of students to introduce, review, reinforce, or assess a concept.

2. The rest of the class engages in the cubing activity.

3. Students are assigned an ability or interest level cube to work on.

4. Students roll the cube a designated number of times and the face that points up becomes the task for the student or group to complete.

5. Students are assessed on their completed work.

cubing
Cubing

Associate it

Apply it

Topic

Compare it

Analyze It

Describe it

Argue/Debate

student directions cubing
Student DirectionsCubing

Take the math cube. Roll the cube three times. Answer the questions that you roll based on the book that you just read. Record your answers in your notebook. Title the page cubing.

slide32

Describe area and perimeter. What are everyday things you would measure using area and perimeter?

Compare. Make a t-chart. Compare area and perimeter. Write clue words in word problems for each as well as the definition and the formulas.

Cubing Template

Solve it. Solve the area and perimeter task cards.

Think about it. When are times we would need to find the area of something? The perimeter? Make up an everyday word problem finding the area or the perimeter.

Create a school on graph paper. Include four rooms. Label each room. Find the area and perimeter of each.

Define area and perimeter. Draw a square. Find the area and the perimeter of the square.

student directions menu planner
Student DirectionsMenu Planner

Take a menu planner sheet. Follow directions on the sheet. Choose 3 main dish items to complete, 2 side dish items, and 1 dessert. Check off the items as you complete them. When it is complete, place them in your folder behind the menu planner sheet.

menu planner
Menu Planner

Main Dishes (Choose 3. Everyone must complete the review test.)

Name_______________________

Menu Planner

Area and Perimeter Menu

Choose between 3 of the main dishes, 2 of the side dishes, and 1 of the desserts.

Take a piece of graph paper, two dice, and two crayons. Designate one color as area and one as perimeter. Roll the dice. With your perimeter color, show an array on the outside of the quadrilateral. With your area color, shade the inside of your quadrilateral. Include number sentences finding the area and perimeter. Fill the entire graph paper.

Make up a word problem on area and perimeter. Make sure that the word problem applies to an everyday situation. Include a number sentence and an answer with your problem.

Complete the area and perimeter review test. Make sure that you draw pictures and write formulas for all 10 of the questions.

Draw a diagram of a house using graph paper. The house must have at least 5 rooms. Label the rooms. Find the area and the perimeter of each room.

Side Dishes (Choose 2)

Write an acrostic poem using either area or perimeter. Make sure the words you use apply to area and perimeter.

Make up an area and perimeter test. The test must contain at least 10 questions. Use clue words in word problems that we have discussed.

Write a song or rap that goes along with area and perimeter.

Desserts (Choose 1)

Create a PowerPoint presentation about area and perimeter. Include definitions of the words area, perimeter, length, and width. Create rectangles and squares and show the formulas on how to find the area and perimeter of each.

Collage/Poster. Find 9 quadrilaterals in a magazine. Cut them out. Paste the quadrilaterals onto a poster or sheet of paper. Measure the sides. Find the area and perimeter of each quadrilateral.

slide35

Name_______________

Date________________

Area and Perimeter Unit Test

  • Mrs. Willis needs to put new border AROUND her bulletin board. The width is 5 feet and the length is 7 feet. How many feet of border does Mrs. Willis need?

2. Ms. Gunn is putting new carpet in her living room. She needs to know how much carpet to use to COVER her room. The width of the room is 10 feet and the length is 6 feet. What is the area of the room?

3. What is the area of the following figure?

4. Mrs. Jennings needed to put a fence AROUND her back yard. The width of her yard is 20 feet and the length is 24 feet. What is the perimeter of her yard?

5. On the following figure, find out which is bigger, the area or the perimeter.

7 in

3 in.

slide36

6. What is the perimeter and the area of the following figure?

  • 7.What is the perimeter of the following figure?
  • Mrs. Wisener measured a window in the classroom. It was 2 feet wide and 3 feet tall. What is the area of the window?
  • Mrs. Frank has a square garden that measures 8 feet on each side. How many feet of fencing does she need to buy to go AROUND the square garden?
  • 10. What is the area of the figure shown below?

9 cm

4 cm

5 cm

rubric
Rubric

Student Name__________

Activities Chosen

1.____________________

2.____________________

3.____________________

4.____________________

resource page
Resource Page

http://daretodifferentiate.wikispaces.com/Cubing+and+Think+Dots

http://www.byrdseed.com/offer-choice-with-extension-menus/

http://wblrd.sk.ca/~bestpractice/anchor/index.html

http://www.lcps.k12.nm.us/departments/SPED/AES/Differentiation/nagc_anchor_activities.pdf

http://www.thirteen.org/edonline/concept2class/inquiry/

http://jc-schools.net/tutorials/games.gif