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Access to Equity and Quality ducation: Public and Private Alliances. Vancouver, 2007. Our recent history…. Civil Wars occurred during the last half of last century Security expenses were prioritized(except for Costa Rica)

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Presentation Transcript
our recent history
Our recent history…
  • Civil Wars occurred during the last half of last century
  • Security expenses were prioritized(except for Costa Rica)
    • In the 1980s the budget of the Defense Ministry of Guatemala represented 20% of the nation’s budget. (2007- 3%)
    • The educational system had insufficient resources:
      • Many lacked access to public education, especially in rural areas
the end of the conflicts
The end of the conflicts
  • With the signing of the peace agreements, and the establishment of Democracy, the region could prioritize in education.
  • Public-private partnerships began.
    • Autonomous schools programs began in Central America.
      • The goal was to provide educational services in rural areas, where poverty rates were higher.
effective public private partnerships
Effective Public-Private Partnerships
  • The public-private partnerships in education have been successful in improving coverage and quality of education, as well as promoting democratic values in the society.
    • Programa de Educación con Participación de la Sociedad –EDUCO- (El Salvador)
    • Programa Nacional de Autogestión Educativa –PRONADE- (Guatemala)
    • Proyecto Hondureño de Educación Comunitaria -PROHECO- (Honduras)
    • Autonomía Escolar (Nicaragua)
educo el salvador i
EDUCO, El Salvador (I)
  • Started in 1991 by community and Government initiatives
    • Its goal is to provide education in rural areas.
    • The Ministry of Education provides technical and financial support to the Community Education Associations (Asociaciones Comunales para la Educación –ACE –).
    • The ACEs have the following duties:
      • Manage educational services
      • Hire teachers
      • Supervise teacher attendance
      • Buy school materials
      • Carry out all school financial tasks
slide7

EDUCO, El Salvador (II)

  • The ACEs receive technical and administrative support from the Ministry of Education.
  • Through EDUCO, rural coverage has increased from 71% en 1991 to 87% in 2005.
  • In many of the poorest regions of El Salvador, EDUCO provides the only schools
pronade guatemala i
PRONADE (Guatemala) (I)
  • Started in 1992, PRONADE brings educational coverage to children living in rural areas.
  • PRONADE’s objectives are:
    • Promote parent and community participation in the educational process
    • Strengthen local organizations
    • Decentralize educational services
  • The Ministry of Education gives financial support to the COEDUCAs, and the ISEs (private organizations) provide technical support.
slide9

PRONADE (Guatemala) (II)

The COEDUCAs are organizations with official legal status in charge of:

  • Supervising teacher attendance
  • Buying school supplies
  • Buying school meals.
  • Managing the financial

resources from the

Ministry of Education.

  • Hiring and paying teachers

PRONADE represents almost 20% of total primary public enrollment.

proheco honduras
PROHECO (HONDURAS)
  • Started in 1999 with the same goals as its Central American predecessors.
  • The Government gives financial support to the AsociacionesEducativasComunitarias –AECO-
    • They are legally formed organizations
    • They are in charge of managing financial resources from the Ministry of Education:
      • Hiring and pay teachers
      • Supervising teacher attendance
      • Buying school material
      • Doing school improvements.
  • In 2004 the PROECO schools represented 11% of total public primary enrollment in rural areas.
autonom a escolar nicaragua
Autonomía Escolar (Nicaragua)
  • The decentralization process started in 1991 with the establishment of “Consejos Consultivos” or Consultative Councils, that later became actual school boards.
  • They are formed by parents, teachers and principals and are responsible for managing the school.
  • In 2002, 63% of students where enrolled in autonomous schools.
the results increasing coverage quality and restoring democratic values i
The results: Increasing coverage, quality and restoring democratic values (I)
  • EDUCO represents 39.10% of total public enrollment in rural areas in El Salvador.
  • PRONADE represents almost 20% of total public enrollment nationwide.
  • Quality has improved: PRONADE has higher rates of retention and primary school completion than regular schools.
educo s growth
EDUCO’s Growth

Number of schools

Number of kids

Source: Ministry of Education El Salvador.

pronade s growth
PRONADE’s Growth

Source: MINEDUC

slide15

The results: Increasing coverage, quality and restoring democratic values (II)

  • PRONADE: There is no significant difference between the performance of a student of a PRONADE school and a student from a regular public system school.
    • That result is very positive considering that PRONADE schools are located in the poorest parts of the country.

- The success is given by the

participation on the communities in

the educational process.

  • This programs have promoted

democratic values.

a public health example el sistema integrado de atenci n de salud i
A public health example: El SistemaIntegradode Atención de Salud (I)
  • Started in 1997 to increase primary health coverage in Guatemala.
  • The program is a public-private partnership between the Government and NGOs.
    • Community health centers provide and administrating primary health services.
    • The Health Ministry gives financial resources to the NGOs, so they can perform their tasks.
slide17

A public health example: El SistemaIntegradode Atención de Salud (II)

  • The NGOs also train community members in health care services.
  • The program has been very successful in increasing primary health care coverage.
    • Since started, the program has increased health coverage by 4.1 million people, nearly one third of the population in Guatemala.
    • There are 401 agreements with 83 NGOs.
  • This decentralized program achieved in 10 years what the government couldn't in 50 years.
conclusions i
Conclusions (I)
  • Public-private partnerships in Central America have been very successful, especially in improving access to public education services.
  • Equality of access to education has improved in Central America with creative schemes involving community participation. Those programs now represent almost 20% of total public enrollment.
  • The quality of education will improve as the quality of teacher preparation and training improves.
conclusions ii
Conclusions (II)

The decentralization promotes the efficient use of public funds.

It is important to institutionalize the above-mentioned programs without changing their principles.

The SIAS has being a very successful primary health care model.

There must be constant communication between government and society, because the decentralization programs usually are criticized by those who want to maintain the status quo.

recommendations
Recommendations
  • Continue expanding public-private partnerships.
  • Explore the autonomous school model in the lower secondary education.
  • Explore other creative programs that provide quality education in rural areas (Telesecundaria, Secundaria por Cable).
  • Continue the decentralization process, with centralized policies and accountability.
  • Organize discussions about the “creative management models” and how to improve them.
  • Inform the media and others about these programs’ benefits.
  • Strengthen the primary health care models, with the involvement of civil society.