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In this chapter, look for the answers to these questions:. What is Gross Domestic Product (GDP)? How is GDP related to a nation’s total income and spending? What are the components of GDP? How is GDP corrected for inflation? Does GDP measure society’s well-being?. 0.

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in this chapter look for the answers to these questions
In this chapter, look for the answers to these questions:
  • What is Gross Domestic Product (GDP)?
  • How is GDP related to a nation’s total income and spending?
  • What are the components of GDP?
  • How is GDP corrected for inflation?
  • Does GDP measure society’s well-being?

0

income and expenditure
Income and Expenditure

Gross Domestic Product (GDP) measures total income of everyone in the economy.

GDP also measures total expenditure on the economy’s output of g&s.

For the economy as a whole, income equals expenditurebecause every dollar a buyer spends is a dollar of income for the seller.

MEASURING A NATION’S INCOME

the circular flow diagram
The Circular-Flow Diagram

a simple depiction of the macro economy

illustrates GDP as spending, revenue, factor payments, and income

Preliminaries:

Factors of production are inputs like labor, land, capital, and natural resources.

Factor payments are payments to the factors of production (e.g., wages, rent, interest, profit).

MEASURING A NATION’S INCOME

gross domestic product gdp is
…the market value of all final goods & services produced within a country in a given period of time.Gross Domestic Product (GDP) Is…

Goods are valued at their market prices, so:

  • All goods measured in the same units (e.g., dollars in the U.S.)
  • Things that don’t have a market value are excluded, e.g., housework you do for yourself.

MEASURING A NATION’S INCOME

gross domestic product gdp is1
…the market value of all final goods & services produced within a country in a given period of time.Gross Domestic Product (GDP) Is…

Final goods:intended for the end user

Intermediate goods: used as components or ingredients in the production of other goods

GDP only includes final goods – they already embody the value of the intermediate goods used in their production.

MEASURING A NATION’S INCOME

gross domestic product gdp is2
…the market value of all final goods & services produced within a country in a given period of time.Gross Domestic Product (GDP) Is…

GDP includes tangible goods (like DVDs, mountain bikes, beer)

and intangible services (dry cleaning, concerts, cell phone service).

MEASURING A NATION’S INCOME

gross domestic product gdp is3
…the market value of all final goods & services produced within a country in a given period of time.Gross Domestic Product (GDP) Is…

GDP measures the value of production that occurs within a country’s borders, whether done by its own citizens or by foreigners located there.

MEASURING A NATION’S INCOME

gross domestic product gdp is4
…the market value of all final goods & services produced within a country in a given period of time.Gross Domestic Product (GDP) Is…

Usually a year or a quarter (3 months)

MEASURING A NATION’S INCOME

the components of gdp
The Components of GDP

Recall: GDP is total spending.

Four components:

Consumption (C)

Investment (I)

Government Purchases (G)

Net Exports (NX)

These components add up to GDP (denoted Y):

Y = C + I + G + NX

MEASURING A NATION’S INCOME

consumption c
Consumption (C)

is total spending by households on g&s.

Note on housing costs:

For renters, consumption includes rent payments.

For homeowners, consumption includes the imputed rental value of the house, but not the purchase price or mortgage payments.

MEASURING A NATION’S INCOME

investment i
Investment (I)

is total spending on goods that will be used in the future to produce more goods.

includes spending on

capital equipment (e.g., machines, tools)

structures (factories, office buildings, houses)

inventories (goods produced but not yet sold)

Note: “Investment” does not mean the purchase of financial assets like stocks and bonds.

MEASURING A NATION’S INCOME

government purchases g
Government Purchases (G)

is all spending on the g&s purchased by govt at the federal, state, and local levels.

G excludes transfer payments, such as Social Security or unemployment insurance benefits.

They are not purchases of g&s.

MEASURING A NATION’S INCOME

net exports nx
Net Exports (NX)

NX = exports – imports

Exports represent foreign spending on the economy’s g&s.

Imports are the portions of C, I, and Gthat are spent on g&s produced abroad.

Adding up all the components of GDP gives:

Y = C + I + G + NX

MEASURING A NATION’S INCOME

gross domestic product
Gross Domestic Product

Firms hire factors of production from households. The blue flow, Y, shows total income paid by firms to households.

gross domestic product1
Gross Domestic Product

Households buy consumer goods and services. The red flow, C, shows consumption expenditures.

gross domestic product2
Gross Domestic Product

Households save, S, and pay taxes, T. Firms borrow some of what households save to finance their investment.

gross domestic product3
Gross Domestic Product

Firms buy capital goods from other firms. The red flow represents this investment expenditure by firms.

gross domestic product4
Gross Domestic Product

Governments buy goods and services, G, and borrow or repay debt if spending exceeds or is less than taxes.

gross domestic product5
Gross Domestic Product

The rest of the world buys goods and services from us, X, and sells us goods and services, M—net exports are X - M

gross domestic product6
Gross Domestic Product

And the rest of the world borrows from us or lends to us depending on whether net exports are positive or negative.

gross domestic product7
Gross Domestic Product

The blue and red flows are the circular flow of expenditure and income. The green flows are borrowing and lending.

gross domestic product8
Gross Domestic Product

The sum of the red flows equals the blue flow.

gross domestic product9
Gross Domestic Product

That is: Y = C + I + G + X - M

a c t i v e l e a r n i n g 1 gdp and its components
A C T I V E L E A R N I N G 1GDP and its components

In each of the following cases, determine how much GDP and each of its components is affected (if at all).

A.Debbie spends $200 to buy her husband dinner at the finest restaurant in Boston.

B.Sarah spends $1800 on a new laptop to use in her publishing business. The laptop was built in China.

C.Jane spends $1200 on a computer to use in her editing business. She got last year’s model on sale for a great price from a local manufacturer.

D.General Motors builds $500 million worth of cars, but consumers only buy $470 million worth of them.

a c t i v e l e a r n i n g 1 answers
A C T I V E L E A R N I N G 1Answers

A.Debbie spends $200 to buy her husband dinner at the finest restaurant in Boston.

Consumption and GDP rise by $200.

B.Sarah spends $1800 on a new laptop to use in her publishing business. The laptop was built in China.

Investment rises by $1800, net exports fall by $1800, GDP is unchanged.

26

a c t i v e l e a r n i n g 1 answers1
A C T I V E L E A R N I N G 1Answers

C.Jane spends $1200 on a computer to use in her editing business. She got last year’s model on sale for a great price from a local manufacturer.

Current GDP and investment do not change, because the computer was built last year.

D.General Motors builds $500 million worth of cars, but consumers only buy $470 million of them.

Consumption rises by $470 million, inventory investment rises by $30 million, and GDP rises by $500 million.

27

aggregate income
Aggregate income
  • Aggregate income earned from production of final goods, Y, equals the total paid out for the use of resources, wages, interest, rent, and profit.
  • Firms pay out all their receipts from the sale of final goods, so income equals expenditure
    • Y = C + I + G + (X – M).
gross domestic product10
Gross Domestic Product
  • Wealth, the value of all the things that people own, is a stock. Saving is the flow that changes the stock of wealth.
  • Capital, the plant, equipment, and inventories of raw and semi-finished materials that are used to produce other goods and services, is a stock.
  • Investment is the flow that changes the stock of capital.
  • Depreciation is the decrease in the capital stock that results from wear and tear and obsolescence.
  • Capital consumption is another name for depreciation.
income approach
Income Approach
  • Wages
    • Compensation of employees in the national accounts, is the payment for labor services.
    • It includes salaries plus fringe benefits paid by employers such as health care insurance, social security contributions, and pension contributions
  • Interest
    • Is the income households receive on loans
  • Rent
    • Includes payments for the use of land
  • Profit
    • Includes the profits of corporations (Corp Income tax, dividends and undistributed Corp. profit) and small businesses.
income approach adjustments
Income Approach Adjustments
  • Indirect Business Tax
    • firms treat this as cost of the production process and therefore add to the prices of the products they sell (sale and excise taxes, license fees, and duties) Production of widgets adds 1.00 of wages, rent interest, and profit income. But government adds .05 to the price of a product. The value of the output is 1.05 but only 1.00 if this value is paid to the household.
  • Net to Gross
    • Expenditure includes investment. Because some new capital is purchased to replace depreciated capital ( annual charge which estimates the amount of capital equipment used in each years production)
    • To get gross domestic product from the income approach, we must add depreciation to total income.
  • Net foreign Factor
    • National Income is the total income of American, whether earned in the United States or abroad
gross domestic product11
Gross Domestic Product
  • Gross investment is the total amount spent on purchases of new capital and on replacing depreciated capital.
  • Net investment is the change in the stock of capital and equals gross investment minus depreciation.
gross domestic product12
Gross Domestic Product
  • This figure illustrates the relationships among capital, gross investment, depreciation, and net investment.
real versus nominal gdp
Real versus Nominal GDP

Inflation can distort economic variables like GDP, so we have two versions of GDP: One is corrected for inflation, the other is not.

Nominal GDPvalues output using current prices. It is not corrected for inflation.

Real GDPvalues output using the prices of a base year. Real GDP is corrected for inflation.

MEASURING A NATION’S INCOME

example
EXAMPLE:

Compute nominal GDP in each year:

2005: $10 x 400 + $2 x 1000 = $6,000

2006: $11 x 500 + $2.50 x 1100 = $8,250

2007: $12 x 600 + $3 x 1200 = $10,800

37.5%

30.9%

Increase:

MEASURING A NATION’S INCOME

example1
EXAMPLE:

Compute real GDP in each year, using 2005 as the base year:

$10

$2.00

20.0%

16.7%

Increase:

2005: $10 x 400 + $2 x 1000 = $6,000

2006: $10 x 500 + $2 x 1100 = $7,200

2007: $10 x 600 + $2 x 1200 = $8,400

MEASURING A NATION’S INCOME

example2
EXAMPLE:

In each year,

nominal GDP is measured using the (then) current prices.

real GDP is measured using constant prices from the base year (2005 in this example).

MEASURING A NATION’S INCOME

example3
EXAMPLE:

The change in nominal GDP reflects both prices and quantities.

37.5%

20.0%

30.9%

16.7%

  • The change in real GDP is the amount that GDP would change if prices were constant (i.e., if zero inflation).

Hence, real GDP is corrected for inflation.

MEASURING A NATION’S INCOME

nominal and real gdp in the u s 1965 2007
Nominal and Real GDP in the U.S., 1965-2007

Real GDP (base year 2000)

Nominal GDP

39

the gdp deflator
The GDP Deflator

The GDP deflator is a measure of the overall level of prices.

Definition:

GDP deflator = 100 x

nominal GDP

real GDP

  • One way to measure the economy’s inflation rate is to compute the percentage increase in the GDP deflator from one year to the next.

MEASURING A NATION’S INCOME

example4
EXAMPLE:

Compute the GDP deflator in each year:

100.0

14.6%

114.6

12.2%

128.6

2005: 100 x (6000/6000) = 100.0

2006: 100 x (8250/7200) = 114.6

2007: 100 x (10,800/8400) = 128.6

MEASURING A NATION’S INCOME

real gdp and the price level
Real GDP and the Price Level
  • Deflating the GDP Balloon
  • We use the GDP deflator to let the air out of the nominal GDP balloon and reveal real GDP.
the cpi the ppi and the gdp deflator
The CPI, the PPI, and the GDP Deflator

Percent change in CPI, PPI, GDP deflator

25%

20

15

10

5

0

-5

-10

-15

-20

1930 1940 1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 2007

Year

a c t i v e l e a r n i n g 2 computing gdp
A C T I V E L E A R N I N G 2Computing GDP

Use the above data to solve these problems:

A. Compute nominal GDP in 2007.

B. Compute real GDP in 2008.

C. Compute the GDP deflator in 2009.

44

a c t i v e l e a r n i n g 2 answers
A C T I V E L E A R N I N G 2Answers

A. Compute nominal GDP in 2007.

$30 x 900 + $100 x 192 = $46,200

B. Compute real GDP in 2008.

$30 x 1000 + $100 x 200 = $50,000

45

a c t i v e l e a r n i n g 2 answers1
A C T I V E L E A R N I N G 2Answers

C. Compute the GDP deflator in 2009.

Nom GDP = $36 x 1050 + $100 x 205 = $58,300

Real GDP = $30 x 1050 + $100 x 205 = $52,000

GDP deflator = 100 x (Nom GDP)/(Real GDP)

= 100 x ($58,300)/($52,000) = 112.1

46

gdp and economic well being
GDP and Economic Well-Being

Real GDP per capita is the main indicator of the average person’s standard of living.

But GDP is not a perfect measure of well-being.

Robert Kennedy issued a very eloquent yet harsh criticism of GDP:

MEASURING A NATION’S INCOME

gdp does not value
GDP Does Not Value:

the quality of the environment

leisure time

non-market activity, such as the child care a parent provides his or her child at home

an equitable distribution of income

MEASURING A NATION’S INCOME

then why do we care about gdp
Then Why Do We Care About GDP?

Having a large GDP enables a country to afford better schools, a cleaner environment, health care, etc.

Many indicators of the quality of life are positively correlated with GDP. For example…

MEASURING A NATION’S INCOME

gdp and life expectancy in 12 countries
GDP and Life Expectancy in 12 countries

Indonesia

Japan

China

U.S.

Mexico

Germany

Brazil

Pakistan

Life expectancy (years)

Russia

India

Bangladesh

Nigeria

Real GDP per capita

50

gdp and literacy in 12 countries
GDP and Literacy in 12 countries

Russia

China

U.S.

Germany

Japan

Mexico

Brazil

Indonesia

Adult Literacy (% of population)

Nigeria

India

Pakistan

Bangladesh

Real GDP per capita

51

gdp and internet usage in 12 countries
GDP and Internet Usage in 12 countries

Japan

U.S.

Germany

Internet Usage (% of population)

Brazil

Indonesia

Mexico

Pakistan

Russia

China

Nigeria

India

Real GDP per capita

Bangladesh

52

chapter summary
CHAPTER SUMMARY
  • Gross Domestic Product (GDP) measures a country’s total income and expenditure.
  • The four spending components of GDP include: Consumption, Investment, Government Purchases, and Net Exports.
  • Nominal GDP is measured using current prices. Real GDP is measured using the prices of a constant base year and is corrected for inflation.
  • GDP is the main indicator of a country’s economic well-being, even though it is not perfect.

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