li to understand symbolism in sikh worship l.
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LI: To understand symbolism in Sikh worship. All religions have symbols. Can you recognise some of these symbols? What do you think they represent?. Kesh (uncut hair). Sikhs do not cut their hair as it is a symbol of purity and holiness.

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all religions have symbols can you recognise some of these symbols what do you think they represent
All religions have symbols. Can you recognise some of these symbols? What do you think they represent?
kesh uncut hair
Kesh (uncut hair)

Sikhs do not cut their hair as it is a symbol of purity and holiness.

Uncut hair, and wearing the turban is a symbol that shows that you are a Sikh.

kara a steel bracelet
Kara (a steel bracelet)

This bracelet has no beginning and no end – just like God, and is a symbol of being close to God. It also symbolises that all Sikhs are part of a community.

What do you think this means?

kanga a wooden comb
Kanga (a wooden comb)

This symbolises keeping the body clean, neat and tidy.

This is important to Sikhs as God created your body and would want you to look after it.

kaccha cotton underwear
Kaccha (cotton underwear)

A type of breeches (shorts) worn by Sikhs. These were first worn by Sikh warriors hundreds of years ago.

They are a symbol of purity.

kirpan ceremonial sword
Kirpan (Ceremonial sword)

This sword represents the fight against evil.

It also represents the fight against injustice and how Sikhs must defend the weak.

The kirpan was used by Sikh warriors