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Differentiated Instruction

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  1. Differentiated Instruction for English Language Arts

  2. Part One: Elements What are some of the key structures of DI? What do I already do and use? Handouts: p. 1,2

  3. Content…. Process….. Product (Assessment)

  4. What does DI look like? “Content” differentiation

  5. What does DI look like? Process Differentiation

  6. What does DI look like? “Product” or “Assessment” Differentiation

  7. Differentiating Content Begin with concepts and competencies (understandings and abilities) Decide on acceptable evidence of learning Decide on specific content

  8. Why Differentiate Content?

  9. Differentiating Process Begin with concepts and competencies Decide on acceptable evidence of learning Offer different but appropriate modes of learning

  10. Why Differentiate Process?

  11. Ways to Differentiate Process Learning Style Choices: Visual, Auditory, Kinesthetic, Social Left Brain/ Right Brain preferences Choices based on temperament: Work alone, work in a group, work holistically, work step-by-step, etc.

  12. DI for Assessment: Showing Knowing Begin with concepts and competencies Decide on content Decide on acceptable different ways of evidencing learning

  13. Ideas for Differentiating Process & Assessment: For social learners: Cooperative learning Reciprocal learning Think, pair, share Role play, creative dramatics Interviews On-line communication Cartoons

  14. Ideas for Differentiating Process & Assessment: For technology-oriented learners: Web Quests On-line communication Power Point Presentations

  15. Ideas for Differentiating Process & Assessment: For technology-oriented learners: Web Quests On-line communication Power Point Presentations

  16. Ideas for Differenting Process & Assessment: For technology-oriented learners: Web Quests On-line communication Power Point Presentations

  17. Ideas for Differenting Process & Assessment: For verbal-linguistic learners: Word puzzles Journalizing Writing-to-learn Metaphors Story-telling Cooperative learning Reciprocal teaching Think-pair-share

  18. Ideas for Differenting Process & Assessment: For mathematical-spatial learners: Graphic organizers Puzzles, games Charts, graphs Quantifying Technology

  19. Depth and Complexity Degrees of detail Numbers of variables, aspects, factors Amount of steps in a procedure Summarize a story Evaluate a story. Analyze a story

  20. Depth and Complexity Degree of abstraction Amount of prior knowledge and prior skill required Amount of independence expected Explain why there is a fire motif in R & J Give several examples of two visual motifs in a film Romeo and Juliet (1996)

  21. Principles of Durable Learning We learn by integrating new information into the existing schema of known information. Language is the currency of learning in school. We learn through multiple modalities.

  22. Principles of Durable Learning Memorization plays a role in learning, but memorization is not learning. Understanding is learning. We learn through patterns, associations, and clusters. Emotions affect our ability to learn.

  23. Concepts and Competencies(Understandings and Abilities):What are the enduring understandings for the content?

  24. Planning for Differentiation Concepts & Content Process, Product Competencies One or more ways for students of varying abilities and interests to access knowledge or skill and to demonstrate knowledge or skill What students will be reading, seeing, or doing to learn new Information or skills This is the enduring understanding and/or academic skill that you want all students to have. is not differentiated may be differentiated may be differentiated

  25. Enduring Understanding: In poetry and music, repetition establishes theme and creates unity, emphasis, and rhythm. What is appropriate content for this concept? What is acceptable evidence of learning? How can/ why should I differentiate for content, process, or product?

  26. Enduring Understanding: Vigorous writing is concise. What is appropriate content for this concept? What is acceptable evidence of learning? How can/ why should I differentiate for content, process, or product?

  27. Enduring Understanding: In English, verbs operate systematically. All verbs conform to a pattern, to some extent. What is appropriate content for this concept? What is acceptable evidence of learning? How can/ why should I differentiate for content, process, or product?

  28. Gr. 8 What is appropriate content? What is acceptable evidence of learning?How can/ why should I create a tri-leveled task? I. EU: Some information is indirectly communicated. Content: Any story Level 1: Students read passage and using rules of charades, act out 3 incidents from passage including info not stated Level 2: Students write a dialogue over implied information and present it to the class Level 3: Students read passage and write three jokes or riddles over information not directly stated.

  29. What is appropriate content? What is acceptable evidence of learning?How can/ why should I create a tri-leveled task? II. EU: Summary: beg, mid, end expressed concisely Content: Level 1: Identify characters/ setting; Write one sent that is derived from each of the 3 parts Level 2: Level 3:

  30. What is appropriate content? What is acceptable evidence of learning?How can/ why should I create a tri-leveled task? III. EU: Content: Level 1: Level 2: Level 3:

  31. What is appropriate content? What is acceptable evidence of learning?How can/ why should I create a tri-leveled task? IV. EU: Content: Level 1: Level 2: Level 3:

  32. What is appropriate content? What is acceptable evidence of learning?How can/ why should I create a tri-leveled task? V. EU: Content: Level 1: Level 2: Level 3:

  33. What is appropriate content? What is acceptable evidence of learning?How can/ why should I create a tri-leveled task? VI. EU: Content: Level 1: Level 2: Level 3:

  34. What is appropriate content? What is acceptable evidence of learning?How can/ why should I create a tri-leveled task? VII. EU: Content: Level 1: Level 2: Level 3:

  35. Example : Tiered Tasks Concepts & Acceptable Evidence Content Competencies of Learning I. Identify the words in the poem that have S or soft g sounds. Use these words in a description of a quiet scene. II. III. Replace 5 words in the poem with words of similar meaning that have a B, D, or K sound and explain how the effect of the poem changes. “The Road Not Taken” The sound of a poem contributes to its meaning. “The Road Not Taken”

  36. Concepts &Acceptable Evidence Competencies of Learning Example : Tiered Tasks • I. Identify the words in the poem that have S or soft g • sounds. Use these words in a description of a quiet scene. • II. • Replace the end rhymes with non-rhyming words: • Explain the relationship between rhythm & rhyme • 2. Identify the words in the poem that have soft sounds… • 3. Set one stanza to two different tunes (or rhythms) and evaluate the difference • III. Replace 5 words in the poem with words of • similar meaning that have a B, D, or K sound and explain how the effect of the poem changes. • The sound of • a poem • contributes to • its meaning. • Meet the • objective? • 2. Is it • consistent? • 3. Is it • well-placed?

  37. Identify the words in the poem that have S or soft g sounds. Use these words in a description of a quiet scene. • Scaffolding: • Underline or hi-lite words that begin with S, SH, H • Does this have a soft sound? • Underline or hi-lite words with G and C • Say the words aloud with pairs; note mouth • Audio tape • Distinguish between voiced and unvoiced sounds • Give models of voiced and unvoiced sounds • 7. Start looking at ends and midpoints of words • 8. Provide the target words

  38. Differentiating Writing Tasks: More complexity Less complexity Evaluate Compare & Contrast Recommend Persuade Draw conclusions Make generalizations List Define Describe Identify Put in order Create categories Apply Illustrate Give examples of Summarize, paraphrase, restate Analyze (take apart + put together)

  39. 1. A summary is a concise version of a story that includes the beginning, middle and end. It also mentions the setting and main characters. 2. Moments are meant to be exploded: One moment in time should be able to be developed into an entire essay. 3. A complex sentence consists of (at least)one independent and (at least) one dependent clause. Interesting writing employs simple, compound, and complex sentences. 4. A sentence consists of a subject and a predicate: A sentence tells you ‘who or what?’ and ‘what about it?’ 5. Specific information is easier to find when you know how the text is organized. 6. Conflict may be resolved through words and/or appropriate actions that bring the elements of conflict into agreement. 7. Some information is indirectly communicated (implied). 8.The author’s purpose and relationship to the audience determine the author’s language choices. 9. A work of literature may be understood in terms of its plot (story) and its theme (meaning). The author has many ways to convey the theme.

  40. What am I trying to teach my students that is worth knowing???? A sentence consists of a subject and a predicate: A sentence tells you ‘who or what?’ and ‘what about it?’ Specific information is easier to find when you know how the text is organized. Conflict may be resolved through words and/or appropriate actions that bring the elements of conflict into agreement.

  41. EU’s continued Some information is indirectly communicated (implied). The author’s purpose and relationship to the audience determine the author’s language choices. A work of literature may be understood in terms of its plot (story) and its theme (meaning). The author has many ways to convey the theme.

  42. Example : Favorite Subject Groups Concepts & Acceptable Evidence Content Competencies of Learning The Odyssey Readers can connect great literature to other fields of learning. Students form groups based on their favorite subjects in school. Groups discuss how The Odyssey relates their favorite subject. Present to class. The Odyssey

  43. Example : Blogging Concepts & Acceptable Evidence Content Competencies of Learning Current event In or out of school, a group of students participates in an informal online conversation. I want students to communicate socially and informally in my subject area to work to work through a problem. Preventing terrorism

  44. Example : Hotlists, Virtual Scrapbooks, Virtual Museums Concepts & Acceptable Evidence Content Competencies of Learning Compile an annotated hotlist, virtual scrapbook, or curated exhibit in a class virtual museum that presents key images and ideas that represent the Victorian Age. www.filamentality.com Charles Dickens expressed a time of great disparity between the powerful and the powerless. Great Expectations Great Expectations

  45. Yesterday: What can DI look like? (scenarios of classes) Fundamentals: Content, Process, Product (assessment) Enduring Understandings Tiered Tasks Unit Menus Task verbs Today: Review tiered tasks Multiple texts in class; books of choice; “fishbowl booktalks” Dialectical Journaling Prescriptive Lessons: writing Internet Resources to support DI; classoom websites that support DI Vocabulary Spelling Planning Guide for DI

  46. Part II: Create or adapt a tiered task DI: Process, Product Handouts: pp. 7,8 Processing & Collegial Sharing

  47. Part III: Create or adapt a unit menu DI: Process, Product Handouts pp. 4,5,6 Processing & Collegial Sharing

  48. Part IV: Dialectical Journaling DI: Product Handout: p. 9,10 Lesson Demo

  49. Part V: Books of Choice DI: Content Handout: pp. 12-15 PPT: Fishbowl Book Talks PPT: On Beyond Summary

  50. Part VI: Internet Resources for DI: www.filamentality.com: Webquests Hotlists Exploration of resources