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British Rock Class 2
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  1. British Rock Class 2

  2. Baby Please Don’t Go Van Morrison and THEM Bio and History on following page. Recording – 1st part

  3. BIOGRAPHY Van Morrison Van Morrison was born in Belfast in 1945, the son of a shipyard worker who collected American blues and jazz records. Van grew up listening to the music of Muddy Waters, Mahalia Jackson, Lightnin' Hopkins and John Lee Hooker. As a teenager he played guitar, sax and harmonica with a series of local Irish showbands, skiffle and rock'n'roll groups before forming an r&b band called Them in 1964. In 1967 he began his solo career in New York where he recorded an LP titled Blowin' Your Mind with the producer Bert Berns, who had previously produced Them. Following Berns' death in 1968 Morrison recruited a group of jazz musicians to record Astral Weeks, a timeless classic which brought together elements of Celtic music, improvised jazz and r&b. Based initially in Boston and then California, Morrison produced a string of albums including Moondance, Tupelo Honey and St Dominic's Preview while touring extensively with his band the Caledonia Soul Orchestra. His 1974 live set It's Too Late To Stop Now marked the end of this prolific early phase as Van returned to Ireland to explore further his Celtic roots. The ensuing album, Veedon Fleece (1974) featured a quieter, more pastoral sound and was to be his last release for three years.

  4. Van Morrison George Ivan Morrison (born August 31, 1945) is a Northern Irishsinger/songwriter originally from Belfast, Northern Ireland. Morrison first rose to prominence as the lead singer of the British/Irish band Them, penning their seminal 1966 hit "Gloria." A few years later, Morrison left the band for a successful solo career. Morrison has pursued an idiosyncratic musical path. Much of his music is tightly structured around the conventions of Americansoul and R&B (such as the seminal singles "Brown-Eyed Girl", "Moondance" and "Domino"). An equal part of his catalogue consists of lengthy, loosely connected, spiritually inspired musical journeys that show the influence Celtic and jazz, such as his classic album Astral Weeks. Morrison’s career spanned some four decades, and has influenced many popular musical artists. He was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and the Songwriters Hall of Fame. In 2000, Morrison ranked number 25 on American cable music channel VH1’s list of the 100 Greatest Artists of Rock and Roll.

  5. This whole tune is in E MinorTHEM do it in F minor but either use a capo or tune guitars up. • Example of the early English rock bands. • A cover of an old blues song by Joe Williams. • Bass just plays E to G notes. Do as 1/8th notes – E E G E. Some versions go E E G G and others do ¼ notes of E to G. At the lick coming down at the end the bass usually doubles the guitar part.

  6. Main Lyrics – let’s try to sing it before playing the whole song. Do the bass part as we play it.

  7. Most of you learned the A blues Scale below. Just think of playing it in the 1st Position.

  8. Here is the scale that it is based off of. Some would use the E minor Pentatonic (5 note scale) but most blues players add in the b5 note to make it a blues scale.

  9. This is the whole Intro. It uses lots of open strings and is based entirely off of the blues scale.

  10. Count 1 & 2 & 3 & 4 & 1

  11. 1 & 3 3 & 4

  12. Try the whole 1st line to the 1st note in the 2nd line!

  13. Try this line before I break it out.

  14. Look at the use of open strings! Count 1 2 3 & 4 1 & 2 3 4 & 1 & 2 & 3 & 4 & Note the b5 (3rd string 3rd fret)

  15. Now let’s play the 1st 2 lines slowly.

  16. Count 1 & 2 3 4 1 2 See how the 2nd measure is in 2/4 time! 1 2 3 & 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 & 3 4 This repeats a coupe of times before the vocal.

  17. OK now the whole introduction. Then we will review the blues scale in E 1st position. The scale degrees for the blues are: 1 b3, 4, b5, 5 and b7.

  18. Here is the scale that it is based off of. Some would use the E minor Pentatonic (5 note scale) but most blues players add in the b5 note to make it a blues scale.

  19. Some other parts • If you listen to the record the guitar plays a double stop at the 12th fret of the 1st and 2nd strings and then a double stop on the open 1st and 2nd strings. • This is a common blues and even other styles use this technique. • Try sliding the double stop.

  20. Listen again for the signing. • Notice the riffs are right from the intro.

  21. Now lets play it • ½ the class will do the bass part. • Rest will do the guitar part. • We will take it slowly.

  22. Tone and settings • Listen closely to the song. • What pickup is being used – what do you think? • How is the tone set? • Reverb? • Other effects?

  23. Well practice it • While we will be doing it as an outline the main points were: • Entire song in Em • Uses just the blues scale • Guitar echo’s the voice • Tone is important • Bass is very simple • While we aren’t covering the drums they are also simple, but very driving.

  24. Brown Eyed Girl

  25. The Key here is to first practice the following: 4/4||: G | C | G | D : ||

  26. Brown Eyed Girl G C G D G C ||: Hey, where did we | go | days when the rains | came. | Down in the | hollow | G D G playin' a new | game. | Laughin' and a | C G D G C G runnin', hey, hey, | Skippin' and a | jumpin, | In the misty morn | ing fog with | our | D C D G Em C D hearts a thumpin' and | you |My Brown Eyed Girl, | | | You're my | Brown Eyed G D G C Girl. | Do you remem- | ber when | we used to sing | Sha la la la | la la la la | G D G C G D la la la te da. | | Sha la la la | la la la la | la la la te da.| la te da.:| | G C G D G C G D G | | | | | | ||: Sha la la la | la la la la | la la la te da. | :|| ||

  27. This is an exercise in 3rd’s Thirds are very consonant and what all chords are made of in traditional harmony. The first 2 notes of each of the measures are the root and 3rd of the chord. The 2nd 2 notes are passing tones and the 3rd group of 2 notes are the 3rd and the 5th of the chord (this applies to the G and C Chords). For the D chord it is outlining the chord with the root then 3rd a passing tone then the 5th of the chord

  28. Counting 1 & 2 & 3 & 4 Fingering 0 1 1 1 0 0 2 2 2 0 This is the 1st and 3rd measure

  29. Counting 1 & 2 & 3 & 4 Fingering 0 1 1 1 0 1 3 3 3 1

  30. Counting 1 & 2 & 3 & 4 Fingering 0 1 1 1 0 0 2 2 2 0 This is the 1st and 3rd measure

  31. Count 1 2 (& 3) & 4 Fingering 0 4 0 2

  32. Here is the whole intro. Take this slowly. Realize that there are only 3 different measures. The 1st and 3rd measure are exactly the same. Listen closely to the sound of 3rds. Try to recognize the sound in other songs. 3rds are used quite a bit in harmony. The other common interval used is 6ths which are inverted 3rds.

  33. Tupelo HoneyIntro: A C#m D A A C#m D A You can take all the tea in China C#m D E Put it in a big brown bag for me. A C#m D A Sail right round all the seven oceans, A C#m D A Drop it straight into the deep blue sea. A C#m D A She's as sweet as Tupelo honey, A C#m D E She's an angel of the first degree. A C#m D A She's as sweet as Tupelo honey, A C#m D A Just like honey baby, from the bee. You can't stop us on the road to freedom, You can't keep us `cause our eyes can see. Men with insight, men in granite, Knights in armor bent on chivalry. Chorus You can't stop us on the road to freedom, You can't stop us `cause our eyes can see. Men with insight, men in granite, Knights in armor intent on chivalry.

  34. Tupelo HoneyIntro: A C#m D A A C#m D A You can take all the tea in China C#m D E Put it in a big brown bag for me. A C#m D A Sail right round all the seven oceans, A C#m D A Drop it straight into the deep blue sea. A C#m D A She's as sweet as Tupelo honey, A C#m D E She's an angel of the first degree. A C#m D A She's as sweet as Tupelo honey, A C#m D A Just like honey baby, from the bee. You can't stop us on the road to freedom, You can't keep us `cause our eyes can see. Men with insight, men in granite, Knights in armor bent on chivalry. Chorus You can't stop us on the road to freedom, You can't stop us `cause our eyes can see. Men with insight, men in granite, Knights in armor intent on chivalry.

  35. Tupelo HoneyIntro: A C#m D A A C#m D A You can take all the tea in China C#m D E Put it in a big brown bag for me. A C#m D A Sail right round all the seven oceans, A C#m D A Drop it straight into the deep blue sea. A C#m D A She's as sweet as Tupelo honey, A C#m D E She's an angel of the first degree. A C#m D A She's as sweet as Tupelo honey, A C#m D A Just like honey baby, from the bee. You can't stop us on the road to freedom, You can't keep us `cause our eyes can see. Men with insight, men in granite, Knights in armor bent on chivalry. Chorus You can't stop us on the road to freedom, You can't stop us `cause our eyes can see. Men with insight, men in granite, Knights in armor intent on chivalry.

  36. Dave Clark Five One of the first bands after the Beatles to come to America

  37. The Dave Clark Five was one of the most successful 1960s British Invasion Bands. They ran neck-and-neck with the Beatles. In the three short years, they had eight top ten records between 1964 and 1967, 15 albums in the United States, and more appearances on the Ed Sullivan show than any other band.

  38. A Short History Of The Dave Clark Five • The Dave Clark Five started out life as a backing group for Stan Saxon, a North London Singer. The line up then included Chris Wells and Mick Ryan as well as Dave Clark. Chris and Mick left and Dave Clark along with Mike Smith, Dennis Payton, Rick Huxley and Lenny Davidson formed the DC5. The reason for the formation of the Band was to raise funds for the Tottenham Hotspurs (Spurs) Football Club in London. The date was January 1962, the place The South Grove Youth Club, the result one of the best known and loved British Bands of the Sixties. • One of their first attempts at releasing a single did not meet with the success that they had hoped. Both the DC5 and Brian Poole and the Tremeloes released a remake of the Contours "Do You Love me" at the same time, with Brain Poole "beating" them out. This in turn was to make a major turn for the band as they then decided to record their own material. • Here is where the genius that was Dave Clark started to flourish. Right from the beginning he held ownership of all the DC5 masters( finished recordings) and to this day is receiving royalties. Management was also an internal affair giving the band more control but also in some ways hurting them. Some people within the music business thought that this move may have shortened the life of the band but at the time it seemed to be the way to go for the DC5. • The Clark/Smith composition "Glad All Over" was released in the late 1963 and by January 1964 was number 1 on the British Pop Charts, replacing the Beatles " I Want To Hold Your Hand" which had been number 1 for six weeks. This song has become one of the most recognizable "Beat Era" hits and still enjoys a major amount of air play today; again showing the genius of Dave Clark who still collects royalties on DC5 songs. Toppling the Beatles brought some major press for the group and they took advantage of this with the release of "Bits and Pieces" which reached number 2 on the British Charts. • During the next few years the groups charting was very erratic in the UK with the exception of "Catch Us If You Can", which reached the Top Ten in 1965 but the US was another story!!! • The Dave Clark Five took the US by storm, spearheading what was to become known as "The British Invasion". A record 18 appearances (for a British Beat Group) on the Ed Sullivan Show along with 6 Sold Out Tours and 15 Top 20 Hits in two years established the DC5 as one of the best known British Bands. One of their Sold Out Tours included an amazing 12 sold out shows at Carnegie Hall in 3 days. Major US hits were "Can't You See That She's Mine", "Because", "I Like It Like That" and their sole US #1 "Over and Over".

  39. A Short History Of The Dave Clark Five • The Dave Clark Five started out life as a backing group for Stan Saxon, a North London Singer. The line up then included Chris Wells and Mick Ryan as well as Dave Clark. Chris and Mick left and Dave Clark along with Mike Smith, Dennis Payton, Rick Huxley and Lenny Davidson formed the DC5. The reason for the formation of the Band was to raise funds for the Tottenham Hotspurs (Spurs) Football Club in London. The date was January 1962, the place The South Grove Youth Club, the result one of the best known and loved British Bands of the Sixties. • One of their first attempts at releasing a single did not meet with the success that they had hoped. Both the DC5 and Brian Poole and the Tremeloes released a remake of the Contours "Do You Love me" at the same time, with Brain Poole "beating" them out. This in turn was to make a major turn for the band as they then decided to record their own material. • Here is where the genius that was Dave Clark started to flourish. Right from the beginning he held ownership of all the DC5 masters( finished recordings) and to this day is receiving royalties. Management was also an internal affair giving the band more control but also in some ways hurting them. Some people within the music business thought that this move may have shortened the life of the band but at the time it seemed to be the way to go for the DC5. • The Clark/Smith composition "Glad All Over" was released in the late 1963 and by January 1964 was number 1 on the British Pop Charts, replacing the Beatles " I Want To Hold Your Hand" which had been number 1 for six weeks. This song has become one of the most recognizable "Beat Era" hits and still enjoys a major amount of air play today; again showing the genius of Dave Clark who still collects royalties on DC5 songs. Toppling the Beatles brought some major press for the group and they took advantage of this with the release of "Bits and Pieces" which reached number 2 on the British Charts. • During the next few years the groups charting was very erratic in the UK with the exception of "Catch Us If You Can", which reached the Top Ten in 1965 but the US was another story!!! • The Dave Clark Five took the US by storm, spearheading what was to become known as "The British Invasion". A record 18 appearances (for a British Beat Group) on the Ed Sullivan Show along with 6 Sold Out Tours and 15 Top 20 Hits in two years established the DC5 as one of the best known British Bands. One of their Sold Out Tours included an amazing 12 sold out shows at Carnegie Hall in 3 days. Major US hits were "Can't You See That She's Mine", "Because", "I Like It Like That" and their sole US #1 "Over and Over".

  40. A bit different • One of the most obvious influences to the music of the Dave Clark 5 was Roy Orbison. The use of augmented chords in the Dave Clark 5 songs was unique and taken directly from Roy’s songs. • G to G+ to G6 to G7 was very common in old standards but not used in Rock at all, Orbison used it and then you can hear the same harmony (even in the vocals) with the Dave Clark 5.

  41. 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 3 3 3 E Aug (note also C Aug and Ab Aug) Any note in an augmented chord can be the root of the chord. The notes in the chord are equally spaced on the chromatic scale. The other chord that is similar is the diminished 7 chord as they are also equally spaced but the Augmented repeats every 4 frets and diminished 7 chord every 3 frets. 1 1 2 3 C# Aug, F Aug, A Aug D Aug, F# Aug, Bb Aug Eb Aug, G Aug, Eb Aug

  42. G Augmented is G, B and D#. Note how they are equally spaced on the chromatic scale there are 4 notes from one to the next one in either direction.