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A CLIL LESSON CAUSES OF W W II. Previus ability. The League's Aims

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A CLIL LESSON CAUSES OF W W II


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    1. A CLIL LESSON CAUSES OF W W II

    2. Previus ability The League's Aims The League of Nations was set up because President Wilson wanted this more than anything else. He wanted the League to be a kind of ‘world parliament’, where nations would sort out their arguments. He hoped this would stop wars. But Wilson wanted to do more than just stop war; he wanted to make the world a better place. He wanted the League to do things to improve people’s lives and jobs. He wanted to improve public health, and to end slavery. Wilson also hoped that the League would persuade the nations to agree to disarmament – to put down their weapons. That would make war impossible. Finally, Wilson thought that the League of Nations could enforce the Treaty of Versailles, and persuade countries to keep the promises they had made. http://www.bbc.co.uk/schools/gcsebitesize/history

    3. The League of Nations was set up because President …………………wanted this more than anything else. He wanted the League to be a kind of ‘world parliament’, where nations would sort out their arguments. He hoped this would stop…….. But Wilson wanted to do more than just stop war; he wanted to make the world a better place. He wanted the League to do things to improve people’s lives and jobs. He wanted to improve public health, and to end slavery. Wilson also hoped that the League would persuade the nations to agree to……………………– to put down their …………………... That would make war impossible. Finally, Wilson thought that the League of Nations could enforce the Treaty of …………………., and persuade countries to keep the promises they had made. Per ciascuno degli spazi vuoti è data una serie di risposte alternative ,scegliere la parola appropriata Nations Versailles Wilson disarmament wars weapons Treaty parliament arguments health http://www.bbc.co.uk/apps/ifl/schools/gcsebitesize/history/quizengine?quiz=thetreatytest&templateStyle=history

    4. The Great Depression led manycountriestoadopt aggressive foreignpolicies Saper riconoscere le cause che determinano conflitti After Hitler cametopower in 1933, hisplanstoaverturn the TV led toincreasedtensions in Europe content cultural Essere consapevoli dell’importanza di conoscere i fatti storici affinchè non si ripetano The failureof the League ofNation led Hitler to take boldactionsafter 1935 Causes of WWII Hitler wasopposedtoCommunism Languageoflearning Hitler wasencourageby the League’s failure unemployment understanding cognition autocracy learning communication League ofnationbecameineffective Hitler e il Nazismo Il mondo diviso Key vocabulary Great Depression capitalismo Languagethroughlearning nationalism Cause della II G.M. Languageforlearning Assessing Self-assestment Pitched battles New expression New vocabulary Pair work

    5. AUDIO SCRIPT This is a listening activity based on this educational video providedwithsubtitlesfrom you tube http://www.youtube.com/user/zaneeducate. CAUSES OF WORLD WAR 2 The late 1920s brought prosperity and high hopes for the future to many people in the industrialized nations of Europe and America But as the Great Depression spread across the world in the 1930s, poverty and unemployment caused millions of people to lose faith in capitalism and democracy The economic and political system that prevailed in the highly industrialized countries Germany, just to recover from the burden of war reparations, was especially hard hit by the depression. As unemployment skyrocketed from two million in 1930 to more than six million in 1932 Germans turned against the leaders of the Weimar Republic, characterized here as inept and corrupt More and more people looked to the political parties that promised radical change. In the 1930 elections, this political shift was dramatic. The social Democrats, depicting the Nazi movement as an autocratic menace, fought hard to retain their position as the nation’s largest party. But they lost ground to the Communists, who wanted immediately to do away with the capitalist system of privately owned land and industry. And the Nazis, campaigning on a fiery nationalist platform that emphasized the superiority of the German people Made the most spectacular gains of all, Hitler’s rise to power had began. In the wake of the 1930 election in Germany, violence became a part of daily life. Pitched battles raged between the Nazis and the Social Democrats and Communists, as Nazi storm troopers broke up opposition political meetings. Enormous crows rallied around Hitler, small businessmen shopkeepers, many of them respectable, upright citizens who wanted law and order. Who deeply resented the Treaty of Versailles, and who longed for a return to Germany’s days of strength and glory

    6. KEY FACTS AND WORDS The Weimer Republic is the name given by historians to the parliamentary republic established in 1919 in Germany to replace the imperial form of government Depression A period during which business activity dramatically declines, unemployment is high, and the value of stocks traded on the stock market declines severely. The worst depression of the 1900s, called the Great Depression, began with the stock market crash in the U.S. in October 1929, and continued through most of the 1930s VersaillesA city in France near Paris that was the site of the palace of the French kings; the peace treaty ending World War I was negotiated and signed in Versailles Nationalism is a political ideology that involves a strong identification of a group of individuals with a political entity defined in national terms Russian Revolution The uprising in Russia in March 1917 in which the czarist government collapsed and a provisional government was established. On November 7, 1917, the Communists overthrew the provisional government and established the Soviet government. Aggression Using force to attack the rights of another nation, particularly its territorial rights; an unprovoked attack or invasion Autocracy is a form of government in which one person possesses unlimited power. The Treaty of Versailles was one of the peace treaties at the end of World War I. It ended the state of war between Germany and the Allied Powers. pitched battle A fiercely waged battle or struggle between opposing forces.

    7. CRISS CROSS CAUSES WW II Created by Puzzlemaker at DiscoveryEducation.com

    8. Across 3. form of government in which one person possesses unlimited power 4. political ideology that involves a strong identification of a group of individuals with a political entity defined in national terms 5. period during which business activity dramatically declines, unemployment is high, and the value of stocks traded on the stock market declines severely Down 1. battle fiercely waged battle or struggle between opposing forces. 2. the peace treaty ending World War I 3. Using force to attack the rights of another nation 6 of 6 words were placed into the puzzle.

    9. CLIL LESSON PLANGLOBAL GOAL: DEVELOP SPONTANEOUS TALKUNIT: CAUSES OF WW IILEVEL: 5 SUPERIORE TIMING:4 LESSONS

    10. AIMS • To present the content of the unit • To present the key concepts about causes of WW II • To help students understand that learning can be achieved in a second language • To help students understand thar keeping a record of new words is important

    11. Procedure Lead-in • The teacher tells the students that they are going to listen to and read a text about the geography of Vancouver. • The students brainstorm the topic (in groups or onto the board). The teacher elicits / teaches basic information (Canada, provinces, west, British Columbia). • Students predict the geographical content of the text (location, climate, population, economy). • Students listen to the Text Part 1 to confirm expectations. • Students are asked to ‘map’ the text on the basis of their predictions. This takes the form of an ideational framework (flow, tabular, tree or star diagram) which can be used as a basis for note-taking later. The teacher provides an example of • a framework (Worksheet A) but also offers the students the option of alternative • diagrammatic representations of the text.

    12. TEACHING OBJECTIVES • Explain significant causes of World War II • Explain how the spread of Nazism and fascism prior to and during World War II affected people, societies, and cultures

    13. A CLIL lesson looks at content and language in equal measure, and often follows a four-stage framework.Processing the textThe best texts are those accompanied by illustrations so that learners can visualise what they are reading. When working in a foreign language, learners need structural markers in texts to help them find their way through the content. These markers may be linguistic (headings, sub-headings) and/or diagrammatic. Once a 'core knowledge' has been identified, the organisation of the text can be analysed. • Identification and organisation of knowledgeTexts are often represented diagrammatically. These structures are known as 'ideational frameworks' or 'diagrams of thinking', and are used to help learners categorise the ideas and information in a text. Diagram types include tree diagrams for classification, groups, hierarchies, flow diagrams and timelines for sequenced thinking such as instructions and historical information, tabular diagrams describing people and places, and combinations of these. The structure of the text is used to facilitate learning and the creation of activities which focus on both language development and core content knowledge.Language identification Learners are expected to be able to reproduce the core of the text in their own words. Since learners will need to use both simple and more complex language, there is no grading of language involved, but it is a good idea for the teacher to highlight useful language in the text and to categorise it according to function. Learners may need the language of comparison and contrast, location or describing a process, but may also need certain discourse markers, adverb phrases or prepositional phrases. Collocations, semi-fixed expressions and set phrases may also be given attention as well as subject-specific and academic vocabulary.Tasks for studentsThere is little difference in task-type between a CLIL lesson and a skills-based ELT lesson. A variety of tasks should be provided, taking into account the learning purpose and learner styles and preferences. Receptive skill activities are of the 'read/listen and do' genre. A menu of listening activities might be: • Listen and label a diagram/picture/map/graph/chart • Listen and fill in a table • Listen and make notes on specific information (dates, figures, times) • Listen and reorder information • Listen and identify location/speakers/places • Listen and label the stages of a process/instructions/sequences of a text • Listen and fill in the gaps in a text • Tasks designed for production need to be subject-orientated, so that both content and language are recycled. Since content is to be focused on, more language support than usual in an ELT lesson may be required. Typical speaking activities include: • Question loops - questions and answers, terms and definitions, halves of sentences • Information gap activities with a question sheet to support • Trivia search - 'things you know' and 'things you want to know' • Word guessing games • Class surveys using questionnaires • 20 Questions - provide language support frame for questions • Students present information from a visual using a language support handout. • ConclusionFrom a language point of view the CLIL 'approach' contains nothing new to the EL teacher. CLIL aims to guide language processing and 'support language production in the same way as ELT by teaching strategies for reading and listening and structures and lexis for spoken or written language. What is different is that the language teacher is also the subject teacher, or that the subject teacher is also able to exploit opportunities for developing language skills. This is the essence of the CLIL teacher training issue.