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CMSWorkshop. Dr. Erica Cirillo -McCarthy Assistant Director of Graduate and ADEP Writing The California Lutheran University Writing Center. This workshop will cover:. Why cite? Integrating sources Three components of Chicago Notes/Bibliography Style – attribution, footnote, bibliography

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cmsworkshop

CMSWorkshop

Dr. Erica Cirillo-McCarthy

Assistant Director of Graduate and ADEP Writing

The California Lutheran University Writing Center

this workshop will cover
This workshop will cover:
  • Why cite?
  • Integrating sources
  • Three components of Chicago Notes/Bibliography Style – attribution, footnote, bibliography
  • Attribution phrases
  • Examples of footnotes
  • Examples of bibliography entries
  • Other CMS references
why use citations
Why use citations?
  • “Provide readers with cues they can use to follow your ideas more efficiently and to locate information of interest to them
  • Allow readers to focus more on your ideas by not distracting them with unfamiliar formatting
  • Establish your credibility or ethos in the field by demonstrating an awareness of your audience and their needs as fellow researchers” (OWL Purdue, 2012)
working with your sources
Working with your sources
  • Summary – a clear statement of the main idea/purpose/hypothesis/methodology of a study written in the reader’s own words.
  • Paraphrase – a much more focused articulation of a specific idea/purpose/hypothesis/methodology in a study written in the reader’s own words.
  • Quotation – must have a clear introduction and contextualization.
slide5
Note:
  • Whether you quote, paraphrase, or summarize….
  • Whether it’s an idea, a thought, a definition, a theory, or a methodology, if it was first articulated by someone else….
  • YOU MUST CITE YOUR SOURCE!
three components of citations cm nb style
Three components of citations CM NB Style
  • Attribution phrase – a signal phrase used to tell the reader that we are about to introduce a quote, summary, or paraphrase of someone else’s idea, words, research, theories, or methodologies.
  • Footnote– when we refer to our sources’ ideas, words, research, theories, methodologies in the main body of our papers, we follow a specific format which allows the reader to quickly find the full citation located on the references list. For CMS, we call this the footnote format, meaning you insert a footnote on the page of the citation.
  • Bibliography – the list of all sources referred to in our papers, listed in a specific way so that readers can easily refer to a source if they choose to do so.
attribution phrases
Attribution Phrases
  • Helps the reader understand that the next bit of information comes from a source other than the writer
  • Looks like this:

(PARAPHRASE)

According to Smith, students who utilize writing support increase their independence and confidence in writing.1

(SUMMARY)

Smith’s study (2011) argues for increased writing support for graduate students.2

(DIRECT QUOTE)

Smith (2011) finds that “writing support services have a direct effect on student writing…”3

1.Jackie Smith. “Writing Center Support,” The Writing Center Journal, 21.5 (2011), 58.

2. Smith, “Writing Center Support,” 45-52.

3. Ibid.

according to rasmussen 2003 p 7 certain verbs work particularly well in attribution phrases
According to Rasmussen (2003, p. 7), certain verbs work particularly well in attribution phrases:
footnotes
Footnotes
  • For CMS, writers insert a footnote whenever another source’s ideas, words, thoughts, or methods are paraphrased, summarized, or direct quoted.
  • You may have to change your software’s default of superscript and unclick the default.
  • Then your footnotes will be full numbers and not superscript.
  • If your professor wants Turabian, then keep the superscript default – that is the main difference between CMS and Turabian.
examples of sources and citation guidelines
Examples of sources and citation guidelines
  • What follows are a few examples of popular types of sources
  • The first line of a footnote is indented .5” from the left margin.
  • Subsequent lines within a footnote should be formatted flush left.
  • Leave an extra line space between footnotes.
  • Please make sure you
    • 1. know what type of source you use in your writing
    • 2. understand where to find CMS guidelines
    • 3. do not make up format guidelines
journal article in print
Journal article in print
  • The term “journal” refers to a peer-reviewed academic journal. Academic journals are considered the most credible sources because they are peer-reviewed and established within an academic community. In a note, list the specific page numbers consulted, if any. In the bibliography, list the page range for the whole article.
  • Footnote (1st reference) – Author’s name (first, last), “Title of article,” title of journal, volume, issue, (date): page number.
  • (2nd consecutive reference): author’s last name, “title of article,” page numbers.
  • (3rd consecutive reference): Ibid.
  • 1. Joshua I. Weinstein, “The Market in Plato’s Republic,” Classical Philology 104 (2009): 440.
  • 2. Weinstein, “The Market in Plato’sRepublic,” 452–53.
  • 3. Ibid.
journal article in an online journal
Journal article in an online journal
  • If you find a journal article via an online database search, then include a DOI (Digital Object Identifier) if the journal lists one. A DOI is a permanent ID that, when appended to http://dx.doi.org/ in the address bar of an Internet browser, will lead to the source. If no DOI is available, list a URL. Include an access date only if one is required by your publisher or discipline.
  • Footnote (1st reference) – Authors’ name (first, last), “Title of article,” title of journal, volume, issue, (date): page number, accessed date, doi #
  • (2nd consecutive reference): authors’ last name, “title of article,” page numbers.
  • (3rdconsecutive reference): Ibid.
  • 1. GueorgiKossinets and Duncan J. Watts, “Origins of Homophily in an Evolving Social Network,” American Journal of Sociology 115 (2009): 411, accessed February 28, 2010, doi:10.1086/599247.
  • 2. Kossinets and Watts, “Origins of Homophily,” 439.
  • 3. Ibid.
article in a newspaper or popular magazine
Article in a newspaper or popular magazine
  • Newspaper and magazine articles are considered “popular” sources and may not be as credible as academic sources because they may have explicit or implicit bias. Use these sources with caution. The following examples show the more formal versions of the citations. If you consulted the article online, include a URL; include an access date only if your publisher or discipline requires one. If no author is identified, begin the citation with the article title.
  • Footnote (1st reference) – Author’s name (first, last), “title of article,” title of newspaper/magazine, date of publication, page number.
  • (2nd consecutive reference) – author’s last name, “title of article,” page number.
  • (3rd consecutive reference) – Ibid.
  • 1. Daniel Mendelsohn, “But Enough about Me,” New Yorker, January 25, 2010, 68.
  • 2. Sheryl Gay Stolberg and Robert Pear, “Wary Centrists Posing Challenge in Health Care Vote,” New York Times, February 27, 2010, accessed February 28, 2010, http://www.nytimes.com/2010/02/28/us/politics/28health.html.
  • 3. Mendelsohn, “But Enough about Me,” 69.
  • 4. Stolberg and Pear, “Wary Centrists.”
website
Website
  • Websites need to be assessed on a case-by-case situation for credibility because anyone can create a website and write information on the web. Consider the author and the purpose for the website when assessing credibility. Because such content is subject to change, include an access date or, if available, a date that the site was last modified.
  • Footnote (1st reference) – “title of website,” last modified or last accessed date, url.
  • (2nd consecutive reference) – “title of website.”
  • (3rd consecutive reference) – Ibid.
  • 1. “Google Privacy Policy,” last modified March 11, 2009, http://www.google.com/intl/en/privacypolicy.html.
  • 2. “McDonald’s Happy Meal Toy Safety Facts,” McDonald’s Corporation, accessed July 19, 2008, http://www.mcdonalds.com/corp/about/factsheets.html.
  • 3. “Google Privacy Policy.”
  • 4. “Toy Safety Facts.”
bibliography
Bibliography
  • Start your bibliography on a new page and order the entries alphabetically.
  • The first line of each entry is left justified and subsequent lines are tabbed in .5.
  • Each section of an entry is separated from other with a period, so if you cut and paste the footnote, please be aware that you must change the commas to periods and switch the first listed author’s to last name, first name.
print and online journal article bibliography
Print and online journal article - Bibliography
  • Weinstein, Joshua I. “The Market in Plato’s Republic.” Classical Philology 104 (2009): 439– 58.
  • Kossinets, Gueorgi, and Duncan J. Watts. “Origins of

Homophilyin an Evolving Social Network.” American

Journal of Sociology 115 (2009): 405–50. Accessed

February 28, 2010. doi:10.1086/599247.

article from a popular magazine or newspaper bibliography
Article from a popular magazine or newspaper - bibliography
  • Mendelsohn, Daniel. “But Enough about Me.” New

Yorker, January 25, 2010.

  • Stolberg, Sheryl Gay, and Robert Pear. “Wary Centrists Posing Challenge in Health Care Vote.” New York Times, February 27, 2010. Accessed February 28, 2010. http://www.nytimes.com/2010/02/28/us/politics/28 health.html.
website bibliography
Website - Bibliography
  • Google. “Google Privacy Policy.” Last modified March 11, 2009. http://www.google.com/intl/en/privacypolicy.html.
  • McDonald’s Corporation. “McDonald’s Happy Meal Toy Safety Facts.” Accessed July 19, 2008. http://www.mcdonalds.com/corp/about/factsheets.h tml.
other cms resources
Other CMS resources:
  • Make an appointment at the Writing Center to sit with a tutor who can show you how to use the reference guide: http://www.callutheran.edu/writing_center
  • Head to this great website: http://owl.english.purdue.edu and click on CMS format and style guidelines
  • Go to the searchable CMS website: http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html
slide20

Questions?

  • Thank you! Please visit the CLU Writing Center in the Pearson Library: www.callutheran.edu/writing_center
bibliography1
Bibliography

Kossinets, Gueorgi, and Duncan J. Watts. “Origins of Homophilyin an Evolving Social Network.” American

Journal of Sociology 115 (2009): 405–50. Accessed February 28, 2010. doi:10.1086/599247.

Google. “Google Privacy Policy.” Last modified March 11, 2009. http://www.google.com/intl/en/privacypolicy.html.

McDonald’s Corporation. “McDonald’s Happy Meal Toy Safety Facts.” Accessed July 19, 2008. http://www.mcdonalds.com/corp/about/factsheets.html.

Mendelsohn, Daniel. “But Enough about Me.” New Yorker, January 25, 2010.

Purdue University Online Writing Lab. (n.d.) APA Style. Purdue Online Writing Lab. Retrieved from http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/560/01/.

Rasmussen, K. (2003). A writer's guide to research and documentation(5th ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ:

Prentice Hall.

Stolberg, Sheryl Gay, and Robert Pear. “Wary Centrists Posing Challenge in Health Care Vote.” New York Times, February 27, 2010. Accessed February 28, 2010. http://www.nytimes.com/2010/02/28/us/politics/28 health.html.

Weinstein, Joshua I. “The Market in Plato’s Republic.” Classical Philology 104 (2009): 439–58.