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Chapter 6: Perimeter, Area, and Volume
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Chapter 6: Perimeter, Area, and Volume

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  1. Chapter 6: Perimeter, Area, and Volume Regular Math

  2. Section 6.1: Perimeter & Area of Rectangles & Parallelograms • Perimeter – the distance around the OUTSIDE of a figure • Area – the number of square units INSIDE a figure

  3. Find the perimeter of each figure. P = S + S + S + S P = 26 + 20 + 26 + 20 P = 92 feet Finding the Perimeter of Rectangles and Parallelograms

  4. P = S + S + S + S P = 17.5x + 11x + 17.5x + 11x P = 57X units Find the perimeter of each figure. Try this one on your own…

  5. Graph each figure with the given vertices. Then find the area of each figure. (-3, -1), (-3, 4), (1, 4), (1, -1) A = bH b = base ; H = height A = 4 X 5 A = 20 units squared Using a Graph to Find Area

  6. Graph each figure with the given vertices. Then find the area of the figure. (-4, 0), (2, 0), (4, 3), (-2, 3) A = bH A = 6 x 3 A = 18 units squared Try this one on your own…

  7. Step One: Fill in the missing sides. Step Two: Solve for Perimeter Step Three: Break the figure into rectangles. Step Four: Solve for Area of each rectangle. Step Five: Add the areas of each individual rectangles. Find the perimeter and area of the figure. Finding Area and Perimeter of a Composite Figure

  8. Find the perimeter of each figure. P = S + S + S P = 22 + 22 + 27 P = 71 feet Section 6.2: Perimeter and Area of Triangles and Trapezoids

  9. Find the perimeter of each figure. P = S + S + S P = 2.5x + 5y + 2x + 2x + 4y P = 6.5x + 9y Try this one on your own…

  10. Graph and find the area of each figure with the given vertices. (-1,-3), (0,2), (3,2), (3, -3) A = ½ x h x (b1 + b2) A = ½ x 5 x (4 +3) A = ½ x 5 x (7) A = 2.5 x 7 A =17.5 units squared Find the area of triangles and trapezoids.

  11. A = ½ x h x (B1 + B2) A = ½ x 3 x (3 + 5) A = ½ x 3 x (8) A = 1.5 x 8 A = 12 units squared Graph and find the area of each figure with the given vertices. (-3,-2), (-3,1), (0,1), (2, -2) Try this one on your own…

  12. Section 6.3: The Pythagorean Theorem

  13. Example 1: Finding the length of the hypotenuse. • Find the length of the hypotenuse.

  14. Graph the triangle with coordinates (6,1), (0,9), and (0,1). • Find the length of the hypotenuse.

  15. Try this one on your own… • Find the length of the hypotenuse. • C = 6.40 • Graph the triangle with the following coordinates (1,-2), (1,7), and (13,-2). • A = 9 • B = 12 • Find the length of the hypotenuse. • C = 15

  16. Example 2: Finding the length of a Leg in a Right Triangle • Solve for the unknown side in the right triangle.

  17. Try this one on your own… • Solve for the unknown side in the right triangle. • b = 24

  18. Example 3: Using the Pythagorean Theorem to Find Area • Use the Pythagorean Theorem to find the height of the triangle. • Then, use the height to find the area of the triangle.

  19. Try this one on your own… • Use the Pythagorean Theorem to find the height of the triangle. • h = square root of 20 or 4.47 • Then, use the height to find the area of the triangle. • A = 17.89 units squared

  20. Section 6.4: Circles

  21. Finding the circumference of a Circle. • Find the circumference of each circle, both in terms of pi and to the nearest tenth. Use 3.14 for pi. • Circle with radius 5 cm • Circle with diameter 1.5 in

  22. Try these on your own… • Find the circumference of each circle, both in terms of pi and to the nearest tenth. Use 3.14 for pi. • Circle with radius 4 m • C = 8pi m or 25.1 m • Circle with diameter 3.3 ft • C = 3.3pi or 10.4 ft

  23. Finding the Area of a Circle. • Find the area of each circle, both in terms of pi and to the nearest tenth. Use 3.14 for pi. • Circle with radius 5 cm • Circle with diameter 1.5 in

  24. Try these on your own… • Find the area of each circle, both in terms of pi and to the nearest tenth. Use 3.14 for pi. • Circle with radius 4 in • A = 16pi inches squared or 50.2 inches squared • Circle with diameter 3.3 m • A = 2.7225pi meters squared or 8.5 meters squared

  25. Finding Area and Circumference on a Coordinate Plane. • Graph the circle with center (-1,1) that passes through (-1,3). Find the area and circumference, both in terms of pi and to the nearest tenth. Use 3.14 for pi. • Step One: Graph Circle • Step Two: Find the radius • Step Three: Use the Area and Circumference Formula

  26. Try this one on your own… • Graph the circle with center (-2,1) that passes through (1,-1). Find the area and circumference, both in terms of pi and to the nearest tenth. Use 3.14 for pi. • A = 9pi units squared and 28.3 units squared • C = 6pi units and 18.8 units

  27. A bicycle odometer recorded 147 revolutions of a wheel with diameter 4/3 ft. How far did the bicycle travel? Use 22/7 for pi. • The distance traveled is the circumference of the wheel times the number of revolutions. • C = pi(d) = (22/7) (4/3) = 88/21 • Circumference x Revolutions • 88/21 x 147 = 616 feet

  28. Try this one on your own… • A Ferris wheel has a diameter of 56 feet and makes 15 revolutions per ride. How far would someone travel during a ride? Use 22/7 for pi. • C = 22/7(56) = 176 feet • Distance = 176 (15) = 2640 feet

  29. Section 6.5: Drawing Three Dimensional Figures Example 1: Drawing a Rectangular Box • Use isometric dot paper to sketch a rectangular box that is 4 units long, 2 units wide, and 3 units high. • Step 1: Lightly draw the edges of the bottom face. It will look like a parallelogram. • 2 units by 4 units • Step 2: Lightly draw the vertical line segments from the vertices of the base. • 3 units high • Step 3: Lightly draw the top face by connecting the vertical lines to form a parallelogram. • 2 units by 4 units • Step 4: Darken the lines. • Use solid lines for the edges that are visible and dashed lines for the edges that are hidden.

  30. Example 2: Sketching a One-Point Perspective Drawing • Step 1: Draw a rectangle. • This will be the front face. • Label the vertices A through D. • Step 2: Mark a vanishing point “V” somewhere above your rectangle, and draw a dashed line from each vertex to “V”. • Step 3: Choose a point “G” on line BV. Lightly draw a smaller rectangle that has G as one of its vertices. • Step 4: Connect the vertices of the two rectangles along the dashed lines. • Step 5: Darken the visible edges, and draw dashed segments for the hidden edges. Erase the vanishing point and all the lines connecting it to the vertices.

  31. Example 3: Sketching a Two-Point Perspective Drawing • Step 1: Draw a vertical segment and label it AD. Draw a horizontal line above segment AD. Label vanishing points V and W on the line. Draw dashed segments AV, AW, DV, and DW. • Step 2: Label point C on segment DV and point E on segment DW. Draw vertical segments through C and E. Draw segment EV and CW. • Step 3: Darken the visible edges. Erase horizon lines and dashed segments.

  32. Section 6.6: Volume of Prisms and Cylinders

  33. Example 1: Finding the Volume of Prisms and Cylinders • Find the volume of each figure to the nearest tenth. • Step One: Figure out what formula to use. • Step Two: Plug the numbers into the formula. • Step Three: Solve

  34. Try this one on your own… • Find the volume of each figure to the nearest tenth.

  35. Example 2: Exploring the Effects of Changing Dimensions A juice can has a radius of 1.5 inches and a height of 5 inches. Explain whether doubling the height of the can would have the same effect on the volume as doubling the radius.

  36. Try this one on your own.. • A juice can has a radius of 2 inches and a height of 5 inches. Explain whether tripling the height would have the same effect on the volume as tripling the radius.

  37. Example 1: Finding the Volume of Prisms and Cylinders • Find the volume of each figure to the nearest tenth. • A rectangular prism with base 1 meter by 3 meters and height of 6 meters

  38. Try these on your own… • Find the volume of each figure to the nearest tenth. • A rectangular prism with base 2 cm by 5 cm and a height of 3cm

  39. Example 2: Exploring the Effects of Changing Dimensions • A juice box measures 3 inches by 2 inches by 4 inches. Explain whether doubling the length, width, or height of the box would double the amount of juice the box holds.

  40. Try this one on your own… • A juice box measures 3 inches by 2 inches by 4 inches. Explain whether tripling the length, width, or height would triple the amount of juice the box holds.

  41. Kansai International Airport is a man-made island that is a rectangular prism measuring 60 ft deep, 4000 ft wide, and 2.5 miles long. What is the volume of rock, gravel, and concrete that was needed to build the island? Try this one on your own… A section of an airport runway is a rectangular prism measuring 2 feet thick, 100 feet wide, and 1.5 miles long. What is the volume of material that was needed to build the runway? Example 3: Construction Application

  42. Example 4: Finding the Volume of Composite Figures • Find the volume of the milk carton.

  43. Try this one on your own… • Find the volume of the barn.

  44. Section 6.7: Volume of Pyramids and Cones

  45. Find the volume of each figure. Try this one on your own… Find the volume of each figure. Example 1: Finding the Volume of Pyramids and Cones

  46. Example 2: Exploring the Effects of Changing Dimensions • A cone has a radius 7 feet and height 14 feet. Explain whether tripling the height would have the same effect on the volume of the cone as tripling the radius.

  47. Try this one on your own… • A cone has a radius 3 feet and height 4 feet. Explain whether doubling the height would have the same effect on the volume as doubling the radius.

  48. Find the volume of each figure. Example 1: Finding the Volume of Pyramids and Cones

  49. Find the volume of each figure. Try these on your own…

  50. The Great Pyramid of Giza is a square pyramid. Its height is 481 feet, and its base has 756 feet sides. Find the volume of the pyramid. Try these on your own… The pyramid of Kukulcan in Mexico is a square pyramid. Its height is 24 meters and its base has 55 meter sides. Find the volume of the pyramid. Example 3: Social Studies Application