common problems of the aging athlete n.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Common Problems of the Aging Athlete PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Common Problems of the Aging Athlete

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 78

Common Problems of the Aging Athlete - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 129 Views
  • Uploaded on

Common Problems of the Aging Athlete. Brian L. Badman M.D. Orthopedics and Sports Medicine of Indiana Hendricks Regional Health. Rotator Cuff Injuries. Rotator Cuff Anatomy. 4 muscles/tendons Supraspinatus Infraspinatus Teres Minor Subscapularis. Rotator Cuff Function.

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

Common Problems of the Aging Athlete


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
    Presentation Transcript
    1. Common Problems of the Aging Athlete Brian L. Badman M.D. Orthopedics and Sports Medicine of Indiana Hendricks Regional Health

    2. Rotator Cuff Injuries

    3. Rotator Cuff Anatomy • 4 muscles/tendons • Supraspinatus • Infraspinatus • Teres Minor • Subscapularis

    4. Rotator Cuff Function • Shoulder rotation • Arm elevation • Helps keep humeral head within shoulder socket

    5. Rotator Cuff Injuries • The position of injury for the rotator cuff is overhead WHY?

    6. Rotator Cuff Injuries • Overhead Position • Impingement between humerus and acromion • Least efficient/weakest position for cuff • Poor blood supply to tendons

    7. Rotator Cuff Injuries • What causes the injury? • Trauma • Fall on an outstretched hand • Arm forcefully pulled to side or downward • Overuse • Repetitive lifting, loading

    8. Traumatic Causes • Tear of Tendons • Partial • Complete

    9. Overuse Causes Chronic Inflammation Bursitis Fraying Gradual progression of tear ONCE TEARING STARTS IT IS EASIER TO PROGRESS

    10. Why Does it Worsen? Weakened cuff cannot protect itself Space between acromion and humerus narrows Impingement worsens Tear progresses

    11. Watershed Region/Zone of Injury

    12. Torn Rotator Cuff

    13. Symptoms • Pain in deltoid region • Upper outer arm • Pain worse with overhead activities • Night pain • Pain with exertion • Lifting

    14. Symptoms • MUST ALWAYS EVALUATE NECK AS SYMPTOMS FROM A HERNIATED DISK CAUSING NERVE IMPINGEMENT ARE SIMILIAR

    15. Evaluation • History • Physical Examination • MRI

    16. Evaluation • History • Trauma, location, provocation of symptoms • Exam • Pain with isolated cuff testing • Impingement signs • Weakness

    17. Evaluation • MRI • NEED HIGH QUALITY MAGNET! • Insurance will pay the same so might as well insist on best quality study • Your doctor may not be aware that this is important so stress the need for a CLOSED MRIunless you are claustrophobic • In-office • Open MRI POOR QUALITY STUDIES

    18. Treatment • If have a partial tear or cuff just inflamed (bursitis, tendonitis) • Physical Therapy • NSAIDS (Motrin, alleve, advil, celebrex) • +/- Steroid Injection • Rest • Avoid overhead activities and lifting It may take several months for pain and inflammation to resolve

    19. Rotator Cuff Exercises

    20. Rotator Cuff Exercises: High Level

    21. Treatment • Complete Tear • In active individuals surgery is generally indicated • Rotator cuff will not heal itself • Results are better if a traumatic tear is fixed acutely (2-3 weeks) • Takes 12 weeks for repair to heal to bone • Anticipate a year to recover • 3 monthsbegin overhead activities • 6 monthsMay resume most activities as long as motion is good

    22. Postop Rehab • Because the cuff heals slowly (12 weeks minimum) the repair is easily damaged if stressed too soon after surgery • Slow progression with motion and strengthening is necessary • May result in stiffness • Usually resolves but may take entire year to return

    23. Goals of Surgery • Repair tear • Alleviate pain • Maintain full ROM • Maintain strength

    24. Surgery • Arthroscopic • Open Healing times are the same!

    25. Surgery • Arthroscopic • Less pain • Small incisions • ?Less stiffness • Some tears are not repairable thru the scope • Some tears are not repairable at all!

    26. Arthroscopic Surgery • Acromioplasty • Make more room for repair and eliminate spurs that may have predisposed to tear

    27. Arthroscopic Surgery • Place anchors with sutures attached

    28. Knee Injuries:Diagnosis, Treatment and Prevention

    29. Anatomy Definitions • Ligaments: Connect bones around joints, Provide joint stability Check reins • Tendons: Anchor muscles to bones Cords • Bones: Structural Supportsscaffold • Articular Cartilage: Gliding Cartilage, Low friction smooth surfaceCovers Bone • Meniscal Cartilage: Cushion Cartilage Shock absorber

    30. Anatomy

    31. Ligaments • ACL: Anterior Cruciate Ligament • PCL: Posterior Cruciate Ligament • MCL: Medial Collateral Ligament • LCL: Lateral Collateral Ligament

    32. Bone • Provides structural support • Attachment Site for muscles, ligaments tendons • Bursa: Fluid filled sack covering bone, reduces friction • Bursitis: Inflammation of the sack due to trauma, excess friction • Subject to fracture and bruising with trauma

    33. Tendons • Connect muscle to bone • Glide in confined spaces • Subject to friction • Leads to inflammation when overused • Trainable, Adapt to use

    34. Articular Cartilage • Gliding cartilage on joint surface • Specialized low friction, shock absorbing material • Lubricated by specialized fluid • Arthritis: Wear and inflammation lead to roughening of the cartilage surface, less efficient more friction

    35. Articular Cartilage Injuries • Can result from chronic wear or sudden injury • Can delaminate at bone-cartilage interface • Sx: • Pain • Swelling • Popping • Catching • Locking

    36. Knee Arthroscopy • Small incisions • Camera placed into the joint • Small instruments trim and smooth cartilage • Operate using a video monitor

    37. Surgical Treatment

    38. Treatment

    39. New Treatments • Autologous Chondrocyte Implantation (ACI) • Grow your own cartilage and reinsert into the knee • Larger 2 staged surgery • Grows new gliding cartilage

    40. Prevention • Difficult • Injury/ Trauma avoidance • Adequate sports preparation, muscle balance • Jumping, landing skills • Don’t ignore joint instability- increases risk of further injury to the cartilage • Possible role for glucosamine, chondroitin

    41. Result

    42. Meniscal Cartilage • Located between the femur and tibia • Acts like a shock absorber in the knee • Structurally different from articular cartilage • Subject to tearing and can “pinch” in joint

    43. Meniscus Injuries • Tears of the cushion cartilage in the knee • Sx: • Popping • Sharp pain along joint • Swelling • Twisting pain • Flexion, squat, stairs • Locking if displaced

    44. Treatment • Rest, Activity modification • Strengthening, therapy, • Steroid Injection +/- • Surgery for continued sx’s or recurrence

    45. Surgical Appearance

    46. Prevention • Difficult, often part of the aging process • Meniscus weakens, susceptible to tearing • Stressed more with twisting, deep bending • Routine low impact exercise • Caution with deep flexion exercise • Choose your parents well