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Digital Divide Summit
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  1. Digital Divide Summit 2000 Conference on Information TechnologyLeague for Innovation

  2. Gerardo E. de los Santos Vice President for Alliance ServicesLeague for Innovation E-mail: delossantos@league.org Alfredo G. de los Santos Jr. Senior League Fellow League for Innovation; Research Professor Arizona State University E-mail: delossantos@asu.edu Moderators

  3. Agenda • Part I: Three 20 Minute Keynote Presentations (1 Hour) • Part II: Focus Groups/Affinity Activity (1 1/2 hours) • Part III: Summary/Debrief /Next Steps(1/2 hour)

  4. Keynote Presenters • George Boggs, PresidentAmerican Association of Community Colleges • Norman Fortenberry, DirectorDivision of Undergraduate EducationNational Science Foundation • David Bolt, Executive DirectorPBS Digital Divide SeriesMiramar Studios

  5. Faces of the Future: Community Colleges Bridging the Digital Divide George Boggs, President American Association of Community College

  6. No Internet Experience Source: Faces of the Future, AACC

  7. No Internet Experience • Credit • 11% of all students • 33% 60 or older • 20% students 40 to 59 years old • 20% of the single parents • 15% of first generation students Source: Faces of the Future, AACC

  8. No Internet Experience • Noncredit • 34% unemployed, looking for work • 40% unemployed, not looking for work • Over 50% of students aged 60 or older • Only 17% aged 18 to 20 Source: Faces of the Future, AACC

  9. Problems with Cost of Computers Source: Faces of the Future, AACC

  10. Problems with Cost of Computers • Consistently rated as one of the top five problems • 20% of credit students as major problem • 28% students aged 26 to 39 • 25% of first-generation students • 39% of single parents Source: Faces of the Future, AACC

  11. Training for IT Field • 18% of credit students cited developing computer skill as major reason for attending • 23% first-generation • 25% single parents • 24% unemployed • 33% of noncredit students aged 40 or older Source: Faces of the Future, AACC

  12. Training for IT field • 12% of Credit students training for new career in IT field • 16% students aged 40 to 59 • 12% of noncredit students training for new career in IT field Source: Faces of the Future, AACC

  13. Growth in Computer Skills • College experience provided a major contribution to growth in computer skills • Nearly 20% of credit students • 31% of single parents • 28% of first-generation parents • 26 and older more likely to report growth for personal use rather than work-related tasks Source: Faces of the Future, AACC

  14. Growth in Computer Skills • College experience provided a major contribution to growth in computer skills • Nearly 20% of noncredit students • 47% of students aged 60 or older Source: Faces of the Future, AACC

  15. First-Generation Students Source: Faces of the Future, AACC

  16. First-Generation Students • More likely to be attending a community college • for reasons related to current job • to develop computer skills • to enter the workforce after a major life change Source: Faces of the Future, AACC

  17. Taking Classes to Develop Computer Skills Source: Faces of the Future, AACC

  18. Older Students (40+) • Noncredit students were more likely than credit students to be 40 years old or older • One third reported a major reason for attending was to gain computer skills Source: Faces of the Future, AACC

  19. Presence of Computers at Home Family Income 5,000-9,999: 11.6 percent of homes have a computer Family Income 20,000-24,999: 23.5 percent of homes have a computer Family Income 35,000-49,999: 46.9 percent of homes have a computer Family Income Over 75,000: 76.8 percent of homes have a computer Source U.S. Census Bureau. Internet Release Date October 14, 1999

  20. Use of Internet at Home, School, or Work by Persons 18 Years or Older RaceAt HomeAt SchoolAt Work White 36.8 37.7 18.4 Black 26.4 33.0 11.2 Hispanic 25.9 26.1 7.7 Source U.S. Census Bureau. Internet Release Date October 14, 1999

  21. Percent of U.S. Households Using the Internet by Race/Origin by Rural, Urban and Central City Areas Source: National Telecommunications and Information Administration, 1999

  22. Urban/Rural Divide • Urban Households with incomes of $75,000 and higher are more than twenty times more likely to have access to the Internet than rural households at the lowest income levels, and more than nine times as likely to have a computer at home. Source: National Telecommunications and Information Administration, 1999

  23. Racial Differences • Whites are more likely to have access to the Internet from home than Blacks or Hispanics have from any location Source: National Telecommunications and Information Administration, 1999

  24. Race/Ethnicity • Blacks and Hispanic households are approximately one-third as likely to have home Internet access as households of Asian/Pacific Islander descent, and roughly two-fifths as likely as White households. Source: National Telecommunications and Information Administration, 1999

  25. Rural/Urban • Regardless of income level, Americans living in rural areas are lagging behind in Internet Access. • At the lowest income levels, those in urban areas are more than twice as likely to have Internet access than those earning the same in rural areas. Source: National Telecommunications and Information Administration, 1999

  26. Growing Gap • The gaps between White and Hispanic households, and between White and Black households, are now [1998] approximately five percentage points higher than they were in 1997. Source: National Telecommunications and Information Administration, 1999

  27. Employment Projections From 1998-2008 The fastest growing industry in wage and salary is the computer and data processing services industry with a growth rate of 117%. The next closest is health services with a 67% growth rate. The top five fastest growing occupations, in terms of job growth are all computer related. Computer engineers (108%) support specialists (102%) and systems analysts (94%) database administrators (77%) and desktop publishing specialists (73%) Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics. Internet Release Date: February 9, 2000

  28. Total Money Income of Families in 1998 The median incomes, by families, in 1998 were as follows: White: $49,023 Black: $29,404 Hispanic: $29,608 Source: U.S. Census Bureau CPS, 1999

  29. The State Prison Population in 1991 The following is the racial breakdown of the state prison population in 1991: White 35% Black 46% Hispanic 17% Source: Bureau of Justice Statistics. Survey of State Prison Inmates, 1991

  30. Educational Attainmentby Race Race Associate BaccalaureateAdvanced Degree White 6.3% 14.2% 3.2% Black 5.3% 7.6% 3.8% Hispanic 5.3% 6.4% 3.6% Source: U.S. Bureau of the Census 1994

  31. Ethnic Make-Up of Community College Students in Fall 1997 Race Percentage White 70.6 Black 9.9 Native American 1.1 Asian/Pacific Islander 5.0 Hispanic 9.3 Nonresident Alien 2.5 Source: National Center for Education Statistics Data files, 1999

  32. Breakdown of the Location of Community Colleges 12.2% of the community colleges are urban 28.4% are in large towns/small cities 24.6% are in the suburbs 34.8% are in rural area/small towns Source: AACC Database, 2000

  33. Enrollment in Urban and Rural Community Colleges Urban community colleges had 21% of the total community college enrollment in Fall of 1997. Rural community colleges had 13.8% of the total community college enrollment in Fall of 1997. Source: AACC Database, 2000

  34. NSF Support for Bridging the Digital Divide Norman Fortenberry National Science Foundation NSF Community College Liaison Division of Undergraduate Education Division of Human Resource Development Undergrad@nsf.gov League for Innovation November 10, 2000

  35. NSF Priorities • Provide a high quality education for every child • Prepare the future SMET workforce including teachers and technicians • Maintain and enhance public awareness of, interest in, and understanding of scientific and technological developments

  36. The Digital Divide • Decreasing student performance in math and science, • Decreasing domestic base of SMET professionals • Teachers uncomfortable with the use of learning technologies • Decreased public understanding of science

  37. The de los Santos’s Recommendations to CC’s League for Innovation, Leadership Abstract • Education research on access and participation, • Develop strategic technology plans, • Ensure all students develop technological literacy, • Provide opportunities for faculty and staff to use emerging technologies,

  38. The de los Santos’s Recommendations to CC’s • Prepare workers for the new economy, • Create venues where students can access technologies, • Facilitate the professional development of teachers, and • Seek relationships with technology partners.

  39. NSF Response:Education Research • 9729401 George Mason U. This project correlated student demographic characteristics and institutional characteristics with metrics of student success within LSAMP projects. [LSAMP] • 9616499 Maricopa Community College District CISE/EHR/ENG/MPS Collaborative Research on Learning Technologies: Community-based Learning Systems. Exploration of the use of Multi-user Design Environments to help students with conceptual understanding of scientific concepts. [CRLT ROLE] • In FY-02, DUE will initiate an Undergraduate Assessment program. [ASSESS]

  40. NSF Response:Strategic Technology Plans • 9653670 Sinclair Community College developed a “college within a college” to pilot better alignment of curriculum format with modern delivery systems, modern workplace needs, and modern operating systems. [ATE] • A key component of the newly developing Tribal Colleges and Universities Program will be the development of institutional technology plans. [TCUP]

  41. NSF Response:Technological Literacy • 9850052 Prince George's Community College, Largo, MD, is creating an institution-wide reform of courses and curricula with the goal of increasing students' technological literacy and skills and their understanding of the interdisciplinary nature of the natural sciences, mathematics, social sciences, and technologies. [CCD CCLI]

  42. NSF Response:Faculty and Staff Use of Technologies • 9952700 Arapahoe CC is establishing a state-of-the-art computer classroom and, among other things, providing opportunities to use new technologies to faculty at high school, community colleges, and 4-year colleges along the Front Range. [CCLI-A&I] • 9554683 Joliet Junior College organized a series of intensive workshops for physics faculty at geographically dispersed 2-year colleges. The project has reached 778 faculty at 281 institutions in 46 states and territories. [UFE  CCLI-ND]

  43. NSF Response:Prepare New Economy Workers • 9987263 Metropolitan CC (NE) is targeting women and minority students who have completed a tech-prep experience as well as current and former Omaha PS students as scholarship recipients in computer science and engineering with emphasis on assoc degree attainment, workforce entry and articulation to BS programs. [CSEMS] • 9553538 Atlanta Metropolitan College Young Scholar Program targeted middle grade students for exposure to chemistry and math [YS ASCEND]

  44. NSF Response:Prepare New Economy Workers FY-00 The University of Texas at Brownsville/Texas Southmost College (UTB/TSC), an institutional member of the University of Texas System LSAMP, will implement an institutional capacity building activity designed to strengthen SMET teaching and learning and to improve the access and retention of underrepresented groups in SMET. The proposed activity also includes organizing a conference in which representatives of several Hispanic-Serving Institutions will identify effective SMET infrastructure enhancement strategies. [LSAMP]

  45. NSF Response:Student Access to Technology • 0085831 Foothill College (CA) is a partner in a collaborative proposal to develop a digital library for earth science education which will collect existing “works in progress”, develop metadata to assist end users in accessing the works, and develop and implement a community review system. [NSDL]

  46. NSF Response:Student Access to Technology • 9906114 IWITTS (DC) is seeking to increase the recruitment and retention of women in science, mathematics, engineering, and technology fields within community colleges through demonstration of proven gender equity practices. A strong focus on on institutionalization of practices beyond the project duration period. [PGE]

  47. NSF Response:Student Access to Technology • 9906043 Science and mathematics faculty from Lansing Community College (LCC) and Holt High School in Lansing Michigan, service agency providers, and businesses are working collaboratively to develop a model to increase students with disabilities‘ accessibility to careers in science, mathematics, engineering, and technology. [PPD]

  48. NSF Response:Teacher Professional Development • 0087049 AACC, CIC, and ICO via subgrants to member colleges are emulating the GK-12 activity with undergraduate students with an emphasis on developing students’ interest in K-12 teaching careers. [CETP  TP?] • 9634034 Maricopa CCD conducted a 5-year multi-million dollar project to implement innovative national curricular materials to 187 high school teachers in 5 K-12 school districts. [TE/LSC]

  49. NSF Response:Technology Partners • 9908409 South Carolina ATE Center has as a partner a local bank which is sponsoring technician scholarships. For the bank the returns on its investment include • Support for local industrial development • Strengthened ties to the local college • Future customers (individuals and companies) • Broad economic development • Good community citizenship [ATE]

  50. NSF Response:Program Acronyms ASCEND = After School Centers for Exploration and New Discovery <http://www.nsf.gov/cgi-bin/getpub?nsf0099> ASSESS = Undergraduate Assessment (new program to be announced) <http://www.ehr.nsf.gov/EHR/DUE/default.asp> ATE = Advanced Technological Education <http://www.ehr.nsf.gov/EHR/DUE/default.asp> CCLI = Course, Curriculum, and Laboratory Improvement <http://www.ehr.nsf.gov/EHR/DUE/default.asp>