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Living things are different but share similar structures (SC.F.1.2.3). By: Jorge Lallave. Grade Level Expectations. Students should distinguish common characteristics of vertebrate animals. Like mammals, birds, fish, reptiles, and amphibians.

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living things are different but share similar structures sc f 1 2 3

Living things are different but share similar structures(SC.F.1.2.3)

By: Jorge Lallave

grade level expectations
Grade Level Expectations
  • Students should distinguish common characteristics of vertebrate animals. Like mammals, birds, fish, reptiles, and amphibians.
  • Students should understands similarities and differences among plants.
  • Although plants and animals are different, they also share common characteristics.

Processes of Life USF/NSF/STARS

how scientists group living things
How Scientists group living Things?

Processes of Life USF/NSF/STARS

classification goes beyond kingdom level
All kingdoms can be broken in small groups according common characteristics.

A detail classification should includes the following steps in the ladder.

Phylum –Second highest classification it covers different groups with a common physical characteristics.

Class –Grouped families according a shared attribute. (mammals)

Order– How the a class group survive? (carnivorous, herbivorous)

Family – Taxonomic group containing one or more genera.

Genus – The second smallest group

Species –Smallest group whose members can interbreed.

The science of classifying things is called Taxonomy.

Classification goes beyond kingdom level

Processes of Life USF/NSF/STARS

classification beyond kingdom level
Classification beyond kingdom level

Processes of Life USF/NSF/STARS

slide6
Animal Kingdom-is composed of living things made of many cells. They must eat other animals or plants to survive.

Phylum

  • Vertebrate animals have backbone.

Examples

  • Amphibians (moist skin, no scale)
    • Frogs, toads and newts.
  • Birds (wings,feather,beak)
  • Fish(fins, scales, gill)
  • Mammals ( hair, milk)
    • Dog, cats, bears.
  • Reptiles (dry, scale skin)
    • Snakes, turtles, alligator.

Processes of Life USF/NSF/STARS

animal kingdom continues
Animal Kingdom Continues

Phylum

  • Invertebrate animals do not have backbone.

Examples

  • Arthropods (joints, shells)
    • Crustaceans (crab, lobster)
    • Insects (beetles, ants)
    • Arachnids (spiders)
  • Mollusks (sea creatures)
    • sponge
    • Snails
    • leaches

Processes of Life USF/NSF/STARS

classifying the group of the animals according to the physical characteristics
Classifying the group of the animals according to the physical characteristics

Vertebrate

  • Amphibians
  • Birds
  • Fish
  • Mammals
  • Marsupials
  • Primates
  • Cetaceans
  • Reptiles

Invertebrate

  • Annelids
  • Arachnids
  • Crustaceans
  • Echinoderms
  • Insects
  • Mollusks
  • Protozoa

Processes of Life USF/NSF/STARS

slide9
Plant Kingdom-iscomposed of all plants made of many cells with nuclei. Plants produce their own food.
  • Phylum
  • Vascular plants – have tubes on roots, stem, and leaves.
  • Examples
    • Trees, bushes, and ornamental plants
  • Seed plants
    • Angiosperms make their seeds in flowers.
    • Gymnosperms produced seed in cones (conifers, pine)

Processes of Life USF/NSF/STARS

plant kingdom cont s
Plant Kingdom Cont’s…
  • Phylum
  • Nonvascular plants – don’t have tubes.
  • Examples
    • Lichens
    • Liverworts
  • Non-Seed plantsare able to produce new plants without seeds. (Sporea single reproductive cell)
    • Ferns
    • Mosses
    • Algae

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(2)

(3)

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(5)

Processes of Life USF/NSF/STARS

plants anatomy
Botany is the study of plants. A scientist who studies plants is a botanist, and anatomy is a science that study how living things are including their parts.

Two main types of root:

taproot system, a single large root that grows straight down.

fibrous root system, smaller branching roots.

Plants Anatomy

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(2)

  • Two main types of stem:
    • green stems are thin flexible tubes in a bundle that holds the plant.
    • woody stems grows taller and thicker every year.

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(4)

Processes of Life USF/NSF/STARS

plants anatomy cont s
Plants Anatomy Cont’s…

The tubes which carry water are called xylem, and the ones that carry the food are called phloem.

  • Two main types of leaves
    • Needle leaves are thin pointed, and very tough.
    • Broad leaves, are wider and expose more surface to the sun.
  • Main parts of a leaf
    • Central stalk called the “petiole”.
    • Lamina is the blade of a leaf.
    • Veins carry the water and food.
    • Tiny holes microscopic in size, called “stomates”.
    • Midribis the central rib of a leaf.

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(2)

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Processes of Life USF/NSF/STARS

slide13

Flowering plantshave a characteristics that all other kinds of plants do not have:Afloweras part of the plant where seeds are made.

  • Pistil- female reproductive tissue of a flower.
  • Style - is a long tube on top of the ovary, and below the stigma.
  • Anatomy of a flower
    • Anther - tip of a flower's stamen
    • Stamen- male reproductive organ, contains the pollen.
    • Filament- holds the anther and part of the stamen.
    • Ovary- is a female reproductive organ, base of the pistil.
    • Petal- leafy structures that comprise a flower.
    • Sepal- small leaves located directly under a flower.
    • Stem - supports the plant.
    • Stigma- uppermost part of the pistil, receives the male pollen.

(I)

Processes of Life USF/NSF/STARS

classifying leaves
Classifying Leaves

Students should classify different leaves according to their: LEAF SHAPES

(Commonly-employed terms.)

  • Ovate-egg-shaped with the larger end at the bottom.
  • Elliptic-shaped like an ellipse, tapered at both ends and with curved sides.
  • Oblong-tapered to both ends, but with the sides more or less parallel.
  • Lanceolate-shaped like the tip of a lance.

Processes of Life USF/NSF/STARS

classifying leaves1
Classifying Leaves

LEAF SHAPES (Commonly-employed terms.)

  • Linear- long and thin, with the sides parallel. Like grass leaves.
  • Orbicular-nearly circular in outline
  • Cordate-heart-shaped with the wide part at the bottom
  • Hastate-with two basal lobes that point straight out

Processes of Life USF/NSF/STARS

classifying leaves2
Classifying Leaves

LEAF SHAPES (Commonly-employed terms.)

  • Sagittate-with two basal lobes that point backwards
  • Peltate-with the petiole attached to the center of the underside of the blade
  • Perfoliate-with the petiole appearing to run through the center of the leaf
  • Terete-circular in cross-section.

Processes of Life USF/NSF/STARS

common characteristics
Common Characteristics

Processes of Life USF/NSF/STARS

different characteristics
Different Characteristics
  • Animals move freely and plants are rooted in the soil.
  • Animals take in oxygen and give off carbon dioxide.
  • Animals do not make their own food and do not have chlorophyll.
  • Animal cells do not have a cell wall.
  • Animals eat plants, but plants do not eat animals generally.
  • Animals in general are more advanced in their structure than plants.

Processes of Life USF/NSF/STARS

website activities
Website Activities

Animals

Plants

Games

House Experiments

Test

Fungi

Workbook

sheets

Processes of Life USF/NSF/STARS

references
References
  • Harcourt Science, 4th grade “The Chameleon cover", Harcourt School Publisher, Unit A pp.4-110.
  • http://www.cellsalive.com/cells/plntcell.htm
  • Harcourt Science, 5th grade “The Frog cover", Harcourt School Publisher, Unit A pp.2-126.
  • www.innerbody.com/htm/body.html
  • http://www.kidport.com/RefLib/Science/Animals/Animals.htm
  • http://www.usoe.k12.ut.us/CURR/Science/sciber00/7th/classify/sciber/5king2.htm
  • http://www.kidport.com/RefLib/Science/Animals/Animals.htm
  • http://csdl.tamu.edu/FLORA/tfplab/vegchar.htm
  • http://www.dmturner.org/Teacher/Library/4thText/ PlantsPart1-4.html

Processes of Life USF/NSF/STARS

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