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Overview of Secondary School Reform Framework

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Overview of Secondary School Reform Framework

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  1. Overview of Secondary School Reform Framework New Jersey Department of Education MeetingsJames P. Connell, Ph. DInstitute for Research and Reform in Education IRRE

  2. Who Are We? Institute for Research and Reform in Education • IRRE is a not-for-profit organization • We created and developed First Things First • We provide technical assistance to districts and schools • We are working with NJ Department of Education and participating districts and schools to support implementation of Abbott Secondary Regulations IRRE

  3. What Is First Things First? A comprehensive reform framework... developed to raise students’ academic performance... to levels required for post-secondary education and high quality employment. IRRE

  4. Who Do We Work With? • Diverse school districts serving large proportions of low-income students and families • Kansas City, KS(all 28 elementary, eight middle, four comprehensive high schools and one selective high school) • Kansas City, MO(all four comprehensive high schools and one magnet high school) • Riverview Gardens, MO(two middle schools and one high school) • Houston, TX(three middle schools and one high schools) • New Orleans, LA(eight high schools) • High schools in Greenville and Shaw, MS • Norristown, PA(three middle schools and one high school) • Sarasota, FL(five high schools) • Milwaukee, WI(two high schools) • LosAngeles, CA(two high schools) IRRE

  5. Evidence Of Effectiveness • Data from Kansas City, Kansas • Approximately 20,000 students • Majority of children minority • 74% free and reduced lunch • Four comprehensive and one selective high schools • Completed fifth year of district-wide implementation of FTF in 2005 • Data presented is from an independent external evaluation and the Kansas State Department of Education IRRE

  6. KCK Graduation Rate – Six Year Trend All high schools implementing FTF ALL COMPREHENSIVE HIGH SCHOOLS (N=4) Source data: Kansas State Department of Education IRRE

  7. Trends In 11th Grade Reading Assessment Scores: Kansas City, Kansas High Schools Source data: Kansas State Department of Education - all students tested *Preliminary data

  8. Trends In 11th Grade SpEd Reading Assessment Scores: Kansas City, Kansas High Schools Source data: Kansas State Department of Education - all students tested

  9. Closing The Racial Achievement Gap In Reading In KCK

  10. N= 951 N= 2149 N= 903 N= 2150 N= 894 N= 2123 N= 779 N= 2124 Percentage Of Students Achieving ProficientOr Above In Reading (Grades 5, 8 & 11) Source data: Kansas State Department of Education - all students tested IRRE

  11. N= 951 N= 656 N= 903 N= 760 N= 894 N= 917 N= 779 N= 947 Percentage Of Students Achieving ProficientOr Above In Reading (Grades 5, 8 & 11) Source data: Kansas State Department of Education - all students tested IRRE

  12. Closing The Economic Achievement Gap In Reading In KCK

  13. N= 1325 N= 2716 N= 1276 N= 2906 N= 1117 N= 2940 Percentage of Students Achieving Proficient or Above (Grades 5, 8 & 11) Source data: Kansas State Department of Education - all students tested IRRE

  14. Components Of Reform Framework OUTCOMES STRATEGIES PROCESS IRRE

  15. Outcomes • For Students • Successfully complete elementary, middle and high school • With academic skills required for next level of education IRRE

  16. Outcomes • For Schools • Change relationships • Improve quality of teaching and learning • Focus all resources on these two things IRRE

  17. Components Of Reform Framework OUTCOMES STRATEGIES IRRE

  18. Reform Strategies • Small Learning Communities • Family Advocate System • Instructional Improvement IRRE

  19. Small Learning Communities (SLCs) • Small, tall and pure • Themes • Common planning time • Flexible allocation of resources • Collective responsibility IRRE

  20. Strategies • Small Learning Communities • Family Advocate System • Instructional Improvement IRRE

  21. Family Advocate System (FAS) • What is it? • In high schools and middle schools with SLCs • A commitment by all professional and other qualified staff • To work with approximately 15 students and their families • For as long as they are in the school • To ensure academic success for those students IRRE

  22. Family Advocate System (FAS) • What do advocates get trained to do? • Use one-on-one and small-group time with students effectively • Monitor student progress with an academic and behavioral profile • Establish regular and productive communication with families • Conduct effective family conferences • Work with colleagues to ensure each student’s success IRRE

  23. Strategies • Small Learning Communities • Family Advocate System • Instructional Improvement IRRE

  24. Instructional Improvement Activities • Embracing shared instructional goals – engagement, alignment and rigor (EAR) • Assessments of instructional goals used as learning tools • Getting common planning time and using it effectively • Training and real time coaching of instructional leaders and teachers around EAR IRRE

  25. Summary • Small Learning Communities • Family Advocate System • Instructional Improvement IRRE

  26. Components Of Reform Framework OUTCOMES STRATEGIES PROCESS IRRE

  27. June – Oct Constituency Building Meetings Begin school data collection Sept – Nov Continue school data collection Conduct staff survey Nov – Dec Conduct student survey Select SLC themes Jan – Mar Introduction to Instructional Improvement & Curriculum Enrichment Planning Year Highlights Select School Improvement Facilitators – begin training Fall Kickoff Meeting School Roundtable Analysis of faculty & student profiles Determine school schedule & staffing plan SLCs formed IRRE

  28. Jan – June Initial Instructional Training: Engagement, Alignment and Rigor Mar – Summer SLCs begin to meet Develop schedules for SLCs, teachers & students Ongoing System Leadership Development Summer Curriculum Enrichment Training SLC and Family Advocate trainings Fall ‘06 Full School Implementation of Reform Strategies Planning Year Highlights Instructional Coaches selected by district & schools Enroll students in SLCs New teacher orientation IRRE

  29. Questions & Discussion

  30. IRRE National Office 1420 Locust Street, 7Q Philadelphia, PA 19102 215.545.1335 www.irre.org IRRE NJ Team Melissa Brand (mbrand@princetonleadership.org) Laurie Levin (levinassoc@aol.com) IRRE