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The Dynamics of Multiple Infection in Pyrenophora semeniperda PowerPoint Presentation
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The Dynamics of Multiple Infection in Pyrenophora semeniperda

The Dynamics of Multiple Infection in Pyrenophora semeniperda

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The Dynamics of Multiple Infection in Pyrenophora semeniperda

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  1. The Dynamics of Multiple Infection in Pyrenophora semeniperda Trevor Davis and Julie Beckstead, Gonzaga University, Department of Biology

  2. Cheatgrass Invasion • Native to Eurasia • Transported in crop seed • Found in all U.S. states • Outcompetes natives • Alters fire cycle • Persistent seedbank

  3. Pyrenophora semeniperda • Fungus: “BFOD” • Possible biocontrol • Naturally occurring • Seed Pathogen • Generalist • High infection and death rates in cheatgrass

  4. Multiple Infections • Species and strains • Common in nature • Complicated: competition, toxins, genetics, growth rate, virulence. • Varied response • May affect BFOD

  5. Research Questions • Will co-infecting species and strains of fungi reduce BFOD’s potential as a biocontrol? • What characteristics of two co-infectors’ relationship determines their response to one another?

  6. Materials and Methods • Double inoculation • Species and strains • Blotter-plate bioassays • Analyze seeds and stromata

  7. Experiment 1: Species

  8. Research Question • Will co-infecting species of fungi reduce BFOD’s potential as a biocontrol? Probably not.

  9. Experiment 2: Strains

  10. Research Question • Will co-infecting strains of fungi reduce BFOD’s potential as a biocontrol? No.

  11. Experiment 2 contd. Virulent Fast

  12. Research Question • What characteristics of two co-infectors’ relationship determines their response to one another? Virulence > Growth Rate

  13. Conclusions • Co-infectors will not affect BFOD’s performance as a biocontrol. • Minimal (<30% impact) • Reduction in virulence offset by high inoculum load • Inoculation combined with other methods

  14. Conclusions contd. • Co-infections may be useful • Combine strains for application • Example: virulent kills, fast-growing “eats” • Lessens risk of non-target death • Location-specific genotypes

  15. Acknowledgements • Dr. Julie Beckstead • Dr. Susan Meyer • Dr. David Boose • Dr. Ann Kennedy • Sandra Dooley • Laura Street • Kellene Bergen • Lindsay Poston • Lauren Miller • Kristina Bair • Stephen Harrison