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Proctoring a Regents or 3-8 Examination. Proctors are people (not necessarily the classroom or subject teacher) who are responsible for administering an examination in an appropriate, standardized testing atmosphere.

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proctoring a regents or 3 8 examination
Proctoring a Regents or 3-8 Examination
  • Proctors are people (not necessarily the classroom or subject teacher) who are responsible for administering an examination in an appropriate, standardized testing atmosphere.
  • To avoid a misadministration of an examination, please listen carefully to the following video.
proctoring rules to live by no matter what test
Proctoring Rules to Live By :(No matter what test)
  • You must be sure that you have the testing materials you need, and the directions booklet. If at all possible, you should have read the directions booklet thoroughly before the examination period begins.
  • If you have been asked to provide testing accommodations, you MUST be familiar with the allowable accommodations per students’ IEPs, and you MUST know how to perform the accommodations~ especially scribing.
  • You must read the standardized directions to the students in the format you’re given in the directions booklet word for word; do not paraphrase, or skip parts of the directions, no matter if you’re administering the exam to one child or 30 children.
  • Along with that, you must adhere to the standardized and REQUIRED time-limits for whatever test you’re proctoring or providing accommodations for.
proctoring do s to live by no matter what examination or grade level
Proctoring DO’S to Live By: (No matter what examination or grade level!)
  • Require all cell phones to be turned off, or better yet, collect them in a box at the front of the room as students enter. There are directions to be read to the students regarding cell phones in the directions booklet. The students should realize that the directions are for ALL, not just them personally.
  • Be sure to have another adult designated to be the “bathroom escort.” No students should be leaving exam rooms to get drinks of water, or go to the bathroom without supervision.
  • Be prepared with extra writing utensils, and a tissue box.
  • KNOW how to provide the accommodations you’ve been assigned to provide.
  • Be active and visible; proctors should be moving around the room, and watching student behaviors.
  • Count, recount and know that you’ve collected all the test booklets and answer sheets at the end of the exam session.
  • Know the process in your building for handing in & accounting for finished testing materials.
proctoring do nots to live by no matter what examination or grade level
Proctoring DO NOTS to Live By:(No matter what examination or grade level!)
  • Sit at the teacher’s desk reading a magazine, correcting papers, working on the computer, or reading a book.
  • Use your voice to give clues and cues when reading aloud the listening passage, or when reading aloud as a test accommodation.
  • Point to a student’s answer and say, “Are you sure?”
  • Point to a student’s answer and shake your head.
  • Give back the test booklet and answer sheet after time has passed to have the student “look it over,” or to point out unanswered questions.
  • Clarify or restate questions or directions.
  • Leave pertinent charts, diagrams, posters, notes, etc… visible in the room during the examination.
  • Teach an impromptu lesson on specific test content just before the test.
  • In any way, shape, or form alter student responses on answer sheets or in their test booklets.
regents accommodations in a nutshell
Regents Accommodations in a Nutshell
  • Please refer to these 2 documents for the SED and VESID language regarding Regents accommodations:
  • http://www.p12.nysed.gov/osa/sam/secondary/home.html
  • http://www.p12.nysed.gov/specialed/publications/policy/testaccess/policyguide.htm
  • It is allowable for the following accommodations to be provided on the Regents & RCTs as per students’ IEPs or 504s :
    • Read or sign parts of the exam that test reading comprehension.
    • Scribe or use other methods of presentation for parts that test writing competency.
    • Waive spelling/grammar.
    • Student use of spelling/grammar check devices.
    • Student use of calculator for parts of exam that test computation.
    • Read the listening passage more than the standard number of times.
    • Let a student with a hearing impairment (and who isn’t proficient with ASL) to read the teacher dictation copy of the listening passage.
regents accommodations in a nutshell con t
Regents Accommodations in a Nutshell Con’t
  • Please refer to these 2 documents for the SED and VESID language regarding Regents accommodations:
  • http://www.p12.nysed.gov/osa/sam/secondary/home.html
  • http://www.p12.nysed.gov/specialed/publications/policy/testaccess/policyguide.html
  • It is NEVERallowable for the any of the following to be provided as an accommodation:
    • Deletions of any sections of the ELA Regents.
    • Deletion of the listening comprehension section of the ELA or Modern Languages Regents.
    • Deletion of oral skills sections from foreign language Regents.
    • Clarification or restatement of passages or questions on any Regents or RCT.
    • Use of voice tone or emphasis to give clues and cues about key words or phrases on any Regents or RCT.
3 8 testing accommodations in a nutshell
3-8 Testing Accommodations in a Nutshell

Please refer to the VESID and SED language regarding accommodations at the following:

  • http://www.p12.nysed.gov/osa/ei/ela-math-guide-11.pdf
  • http://www.vesid.nysed.gov/specialed/publications/policy/testaccess/policyguide.html

It is allowable for the following accommodations to be provided on the 3-8 tests as per students’ IEPs or 504s.

    • For ELA Listening Sections: Test directions and all questions (in this part of the test) may be read aloud.
    • Math/Science test directions and questions may be read aloud.
    • The use of scribes and the use of tape recorders are allowable accommodations for both the English Language Arts and Mathematics Tests. For the English Language Arts Tests, students using scribes or tape recorders must provide all information for the writing sections of the tests, including spelling of difficult words, punctuation, paragraphing, and grammar.
    • Students may use a word processor (with spell-checking and grammar-checking devices disabled) instead of a scribe.
3 8 testing accommodations in a nutshell con t
3-8 Testing Accommodations in a Nutshell Con’t

English Language Learners

For English language learners, schools may provide the following testing accommodations:

  • Time extension
  • Separate location
  • Third reading of Listening Selection
  • Bilingual dictionaries and glossaries (direct translations only; no definitions or explanations permitted)
  • Simultaneous use of English and alternative language editions (Mathematics Tests only)
  • Oral translation for lower-incidence languages (Mathematics Tests only)
3 8 testing accommodations in a nutshell con t1
3-8 Testing Accommodations in a Nutshell Con’t

Please refer to these 2 documents for the SED and VESID language regarding accommodations:

  • http://www.p12.nysed.gov/osa/sam/secondary/home.html
  • http://www.p12.nysed.gov/specialed/publications/policy/testaccess/policyguide.html

It is NEVERallowable for the following to be provided as an accommodation:

    • Reading to student the parts of the ELA tests that measure reading comprehension.
    • Use of a calculator at any time on the 3-6 math tests.
    • Use of calculator on the multiple choice sections of the 7-8 math tests.
    • Clarification or restatement of questions or passages.
ela scribing how to s
ELA Scribing How To’s
  • The scribe must record word-for-word what the student dictates or records, leaving out punctuation and capitalization, and must circle all words that are difficult to spell.
  • The scribe must use lined paper and must write on every other line.
  • When the dictation/tape transcription is completed, the scribe must ask the student to spell aloud any difficult-to-spell words; then the scribe must write the student’s spelling above the circled words.
  • The scribe must show the student the written response and ask him or her to indicate the capitalization, punctuation, and paragraphing to be used.
  • The student must read the completed dictation/transcription andindicate on the skipped lines any further changes to be transcribed.
  • The scribe must then transfer the student's completed response into the test book exactly as dictated or recorded and should attach the lined paper with the student's dictation to the back of the test book, preferably by stapling, to ensure against the student's response being lost.
math scribing how to s
Math Scribing How To’s
  • The scribe must record what the student dictates on a separate sheet of paper.
  • The scribe must ask the student to indicate exactly where the numbers need to be placed and lined up.
  • The scribe must record the operational sign as dictated by the student (e.g., addition sign, subtraction sign, etc.).
  • When dictating numbers, the student must indicate how the number is written and indicate place value. For example, if the student says “one thousand thirty-eight,” the student should specify how that is written (i.e., “one, zero, three, eight”).
  • When computing a problem, the student must indicate to the scribe how he or she is making the computation and should be specific in terms of what numbers to write down, including how to record carrying. For example, when adding 23 and 9, the student should indicate the following:
  • “9 plus 3 is 12; put down the 2 and carry the one above the two.”
  • The scribe shows the student the written response and asks him or her to indicate if there are any further changes to be made.
  • The student does not have to provide spelling and punctuation in word responses. Therefore, it is not necessary for the scribe to leave out punctuation and capitalization or to circle words difficult to spell.
  • The scribe must transfer the student’s completed response into the test book and staple the student’s dictation to the test book.
proctoring a regents or 3 8 examination1
Proctoring a Regents or 3-8 Examination
  • If you have further questions regarding proctoring or administering accommodations please see your building administrator or CSE chairperson well before the date of the examination.
  • You can email me your questions as well: cdewey@gstboces.org

Thank you!