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slide1

Developing Standards-Based, Assessment-Driven

Student Growth Objectives in ALL Content Areas

Presenters’ Names

Presenters’ emails

  • 1
slide2

Online Discussion Site

Go to:

http://todaysmeet.com/ fill in the name of room

  • Post questions, share information, etc.
  • Room will remain “open” until fill in time frame.
  • Use it after the workshop to continue discussion.
  • 2
slide3

DAY 1 ---Today’s Agenda

Morning Session

  • A. Introduction & Overview
  • Use TodaysMeet (www.todaysmeet.com)
  • Overview of AchieveNJ Evaluation System
  • Activity #1 – KWL Chart
  • Activity #2 – Pre Assessment Quiz
  • Compliance vs. Process
  • AchieveNJ/Teach NJ Requirements
  • SGO Template Components
  • B. SGO Basics
  • What is a SMART student growth objective?
  • Achievement and Growth Goals
  • B. SGO Basics (continued)
  • Activity #3 - Analysis & Evaluation of SGO Sample Goals
  • NJDOE Teacher SGO Attainment Levels
  • 4 Types of SGOs with samples
  • BREAK (15 minutes)
  • C. SGO Development Process & Timeline
  • Introduce/Review SGO process development steps & timelines
  • D. Introduce SGO Template
  • E. Revisit KWL Self-Reflection
  • LUNCH (1 hour)
  • 3
slide4

Day 1 ---Today’s Agenda

Afternoon Session

  • G. SGO Design Template Review
  • Intro to SGO template
  • SGO Blueprint - Walk-through sample SGO
  • H. Data Analysis & Considerations in Setting SGOs
  • Activity #5a: Building a SMART SGO
  • Mr. Smith – Science Pre-Assessment Data
  • I. Concluding Activity
  • Day 1 Feedback Form
  • Reminders: Items to Bring for Day 2
  • DISMISSAL
  • Assessment Literacy
  • 1. Activity 4a: Survey of Assessment Practices
  • Linking Assessment in the Classroom with
  • Student Growth & Achievement
  • 3. Webb’s Depth of Knowledge
  • 4. Creating Classroom Assessments
  • 5. Types of Assessments
  • 6. Alignment: Assessments & Standards
  • 7. Rigor & Depth of Knowledge
  • 8. Choosing or Developing Quality Assessments
  • Instructional Connections: Data-driven
  • Instruction; Differentiated Instruction; Feedback for Students
  • Activity #4b: What Assessments are Utilized in
  • Your School for Measuring Learner Progress?
  • Activity #4c: Considerations When Choosing
  • or Developing a Quality Assessment
  • BREAK: (15 minutes)
  • 4
slide5

Desired Outcomes

Understand Student Growth Objective (SGO) requirements.

Understand and apply the SMART-based SGO development process.

Effectively lead professional staff in the creation of standards-based, assessment-driven SGOs.

  • 5
slide6

FOR DAY 2

  • Bring with you…
  • Resources
  • Standards (CCSS and NJCCCS)
  • Curriculum Guides
    • Grade Level
    • Course Syllabi
  • School Plans
    • School Improvement Plan
    • Consolidated Plan (Title 1)
  • District Assessments
    • Quarterly and Benchmark Tests
    • Performance Assessments
    • Portfolio Rubrics
  • Data
  • School Specific Data
  • Historical Test Data
  • Test Specifications
  • Data from District Assessments

Paper or online!

  • 6
activity 1
Activity #1

Self-Reflection

  • 7
slide8

Activity #2:

Let’s take our…

SGO 101

Pre-assessment!

8

slide9

Introduction to

Student Growth Objectives

June

January

September

  • 9

9

slide11

What is a Student Growth Objective?

According to the NJDOE (2013):

“Student Growth Objectives (SGOs) are academic goals for groups of students that are aligned to state standards and can be tracked using objective measures.”

11

slide12

What is a Student Growth Objective?

  • A Student Growth Objective must be:
  • Annual, specific and measureable
  • Based on growth and achievement
  • Aligned to NJ/CC curriculum standards
  • Based on available prior student learning data
  • A measure of what a student has learned between two points in time
  • Ambitious and achievable
  • A collaborative process between teacher and supervisor
  • Approved by the principal

12

http://www.state.nj.us/education/AchieveNJ/teacher/SGOGuidebook.pdf

slide13

SGO SETTING: “THE CONTEXT”

COMPLIANCE

PROCESS

vs.

  • 13
slide17

Introduction to Teacher Evaluation

Teachers in Tested Grades 4-8

Teacher Practice

Performance on a teacher practice instrument, driven primarily through observation

Stu. Growth Percentile

State-calculated score that measures individual teacher’s ability to drive growth on NJ ASK

NJASK

Stu. Growth Objective

Locally-calculated score that measures an individual teacher’s impact on stu. achievement

Summative Rating

Overall eval. score that combines the multiple measures of practice and student progress

Inputs of Effective Teaching

Outcomes of Effective Teaching

N.J.A.C.

6A:10-4.1

slide18

Student Growth Percentiles (SGPs)… FYI

All students can show growth.

  • Student Growth Percentiles (SGP) measure how much a student has learned from one year to the next compared to peers with similar academic history from across the state.
  • Students scored on a scale from 1 – 99.
  • Growth baseline established by student’s prior learning as measured by all of student’s NJ ASK results.

For More Information…NJDOE SGP video

http://www.state.nj.us/education/AchieveNJ/teacher/percentile.shtml

  • 18
slide19

Teachers in Tested Grades

Tested Grades and Subjects (Currently grades 4-8, math and ELA): 55% from teacher practice and 45% from student achievement measures

* The NJDOEwill look to incorporate other measures where possible and percentages may change as system evolves.

  • 19
slide20

Teacher Evaluation: Introduction

Introduction to Teacher Evaluation

Teachers in Non-Tested Grades/Areas

Teacher Practice

Performance on a teacher practice instrument, driven primarily through observation

Stu. Growth Objective

Locally-calculated score that measures an individual teacher’s impact on stu. achievement

Summative Rating

Overall eval. score that combines the multiple measures of practice and student progress

Inputs of Effective Teaching

Outcomes of Effective Teaching

N.J.A.C.

6A:10-4.1

slide21

Teachers in Non-Tested Grades/Subjects

Non-Tested Grades and Subjects:

Student Achievement will be 15% in SY 13-14. Teacher Practice will be 85%.

*The Department will look to incorporate other measures where possible and percentages will change as system evolves.

  • 21
slide22

Teacher Evaluation: Summative Evaluation

Non-Tested Grades and Subjects

  • 22
slide23

Teacher Evaluation: Summative Evaluation

Tested Grades and Subjects

  • 23
slide24

Principal Evaluation: Introduction

  • New evaluation systems for Principals will include the following components:

Principal Practice

Performance on a principal practice evaluation instrument

Eval. Leadshp.

Outputs that define how well a principal is leading imp. of the eval system

School SGP

State-calc. score that measures a principal’s ability to drive growth in ELA and math

Average SGO

Locally-calc. score that aggregates the perf. of all teachers in a school on SGOs

Admin. Goals

Locally-calc. score that measures a principal’s impact on stu. achievement

Summ. Rating

Overall eval. score that combines the multiple measures of practice & outcomes

Inputs

Student/Teacher Outcomes

slide25

Principal Evaluation:

SGP and SGO Components

School SGP

  • Principals whose students have SGPs will receive the average school-wide SGP score.
  • Principals will be placed in 3 categories: Multi-Grade SGP Principal, Non-SGP Principal, Single-Grade SGP Principal. Component weighting will differ across categories.

SGO Average

  • Principals will be rated on their teachers’ success in achieving student growth objectives (SGOs) each year through an average of their teachers’ scores.
slide26

Principal Evaluation:

A Look at All Components

Inputs

Student/

Teacher

Outcomes

smart sgos are
SMART SGOs are…

S … Specific

M … Measurable

A … Attainable/Ambitious

R … Results-driven

T … Timed

  • 30
growth vs achievement goals
Growth vs. Achievement Goals

GROWTH

ACHIEVEMENT

Students’ post-assessment scores will be ___% greater than the pre-assessment.

On the post-assessment, ___% of students will achieve a score of ___ or higher.

SGOs can be growth

and/or achievement goals.

  • 32
slide33

IS THIS SGO . . . .

During the 2013-14 school year, Language Arts students will improve their accuracy, fluency and comprehension.

SMART

During the 2013-14 school year, all of my 3rd grade Language Arts students will demonstrate measurable progress in the reading skills of accuracy, fluency and comprehension. All students will achieve at least 1 year’s gain as measured by the Star Reading Enterprise Assessment. Students in the below grade level band will attain at least 1.2 year’s gain.

teacher attainment of sgos
Teacher attainment of SGOs

Source: http://www.state.nj.us/education/AchieveNJ/teacher/SGOGuidebook.pdf

  • 36
type general sgo
TYPE: General SGO

ELEMENTARY LITERACY

  • 37

*These numbers will be determined by teacher and principal based on knowledge of students to create a rigorous and attainable goal.

  • 37
type general sgo1
TYPE: General SGO

GRADE 6 MUSIC

*Teachers can also use rubrics or portfolio assessments to measure student attainment. In this example the district created a rubric for 6th grade music teachers to measure attainment of certain skills.

  • 38
type specific targeted students
TYPE: Specific/Targeted Students

GRADE 8 LAL

For some teachers there may be a specific student group that is appropriate to target. In this instance, the teacher identified a group of students with low preparedness who he believed would benefit from increased work in reading fluency.

  • 40
type specific targeted content skill
TYPE: Specific/Targeted Content/Skill

HISTORY

Teachers can also use rubrics or portfolio assessments to measure student attainment. In this example the district created a rubric for U.S. History students to measure attainment of specific critical thinking skills.

  • 41
slide42

The SGO Development Process

SGO REVIEW

and EDUCATOR SGO SCORE

PREPARE

SGO

STUDENT

GROWTH

OBJECTIVES

PROCESS

PRE-APPROVAL STAGE

DEVELOP

SGO

SCORE

SGO RESULTS

SGO SUBMISSION

& APPROVAL

IMPLEMENT AND MONITOR SGO

FOCUSED

STRATEGIES

EVIDENCE COLLECTION

MID-YEAR SGO REVIEW

slide45

IMPLEMENT and MONITOR SGO

Focused Strategies

slide48

IMPORTANT DATES

SGO SUBMISSION FOR APPROVAL (by 11/15/13)

SGO MID-YEAR REVIEW (by 2/15/14)

assessment
ASSESSMENT

The “Heart” of the SGO

SGO

Activity # 4a:

Survey of Assessment Practices

  • 51
slide52

Linking Assessment

In the Classroom

with

Student Growth and Achievement

  • 52
slide53

WHERE ASSESSMENT COUNTS!

Consider Summative Assessment!

Consider Formative Assessment!

what do highly effective teachers do
What do highly effective teachers do?
  • Major reviews of the research on the effects of classroom assessment indicate that it might be one of the most powerful tools in a teacher's toolbox.
        • Marzano
  • 54
slide55

Classroom Assessment Helps Teachers

Provides the MEANS to GATHER EVIDENCE

about what students know and can do

  • 55
slide56

Ongoing Informal and Formal Classroom Assessment

  • Is the bond that holds teaching and learning together
  • Allows educators to monitor teaching effectiveness
  • and student learning
  • Can motivate and shape learning and instruction
  • Can help teachers gauge student mastery of required
  • skills
  • Can help teachers determine whether students are
  • prepared for tests that are used for high-stakes
  • decisions
  • Can help students improve their own performances
  • 56

http://www.ets.org/Media/Tests/TOEFL_Institutional_Testing_Program/ELLM2002.pdf

slide57

INSTRUCTION and STUDENT LEARNING

  • What Is Worth Learning
  • How It Should Be Learned
  • How Well We Expect Students to Perform
  • How We Communicate Results
  • How We Assess
  • What We Assess

Linking assessment and instruction is

critical to effective learning.

  • 57

ASSESSMENT

slide58

Good Evidence Improves Instruction

What needs to be assessed and why?

When planning instructional strategies,

teachers need to:

  • 58
slide59

Assessment OF/FOR Learning

Traditionally, we have used assessments to measure how much our students have learned up to a particular point in time.

This is called "assessment of learning" — or what we use to see whether our students are meeting standards set by the state, the district, or the classroom teacher.

These summative assessments are conducted after a unit or certain time period to determine how much learning has taken place. Although assessments of learning are important if we are to ascribe grades to students and provide accountability, teachers should also focus more on assessment for learning.

This type of assessment — formative assessment — supports learning during the learning process.

  • 59
slide60

FORMATIVE or SUMMATIVE?

FORMATIVE ASSESSMENTis part of the instructional process. When incorporated into classroom practice, provides information needed to adjust teaching and learning while they are happening.

  • Informs both teachers and students about student understanding at a point when timely adjustments can be made.
  • Help to ensure students achieve, targeted standards-based learning goals within a set time frame.

SUMMATIVE ASSESSMENTS are given periodically to determine at a particular point in time what students know and do not know.

  • State assessments
  • District benchmark or interim assessments
  • End-of-unit or chapter tests
  • End-of-term or semester exams
  • Scores that are used for accountability for schools (AYP) and students (report card grades).
  • 60
slide61

InFORMATIVE Assessment

"Informative assessment isn't an end in itself, but the beginning of better instruction." 

Carol Ann Tomlinson

  • 61
slide62

Activity - Brainstorm with Others

FORMATIVE ASSESSMENTS

  • 62
slide63

Examples

FORMATIVE ASSESSMENTS

  • Observations
  • Questioning
  • Discussion
  • Journals
  • Assignments
  • Projects
  • Pop Quizzes (not-graded)
  • Exit/Admit Slips
  • Learning/Response Logs
  • Graphic Organizers
  • Peer/Self Assessments
  • Written Questions / Exercises
  • with Short, Extended or
  • Multiple-choice Answers
  • Practice Presentations
  • Diagnostic Tests
  • Visual Representations
  • Kinesthetic Assessments
  • Individual Whiteboards
  • Four Corners
  • Think Pair Share
  • Appointment Clock
  • Simulations/Business Games
  • Conferencing/Reviews
  • Meaningful Homework
  • Assignments
  • 63

http://wvde.state.wv.us/teach21/ExamplesofFormativeAssessment.html

slide67

Don’t Forget About the Students

  • Formative assessments:
  • serve as practice for students…shouldn’t be “graded”
  • check for understanding along the way and guide teacher
  • decision making about future instruction
  • provide feedback to students so they can improve their
  • performance
  • help teachers differentiate instruction and thus improve student
  • achievement.

“The student's role is to strive to understand what success looks like and to use each assessment to try to understand how to do better the next time.”

Rick Stiggins, Educational consultant

  • 67
slide68

Creating Classroom Assessments

  • Accurate
  • How is this student evolving as a learner? What can I do to assist this learner
  • on his path to mastery?
  • Does the assessment test the material that I taught in the lessons?
  • Does the assessment test the knowledge and skills/abilities related to my
  • grade level? Content area?
  • Is the assessment related to the essential questions of the unit of study?
  • Appropriate
  • Does the assessment design match the types of knowledge being assessed?
  • Does the performance tasks relate to the conceptual understandings of the
  • unit?
  • Relevant
  • Does the assessment match the goals of the unit? Lesson?
  • Will the student(s) be able to successfully accomplish the
  • assessment?
  • Does the assessment provide me with evidence of student growth?
  • Student achievement?
  • 68
suggested guidelines assessment creation njdoe 2013
Suggested Guidelines:Assessment Creation (NJDOE - 2013)
  • Develop assessments collaboratively.
  • Align all assessments with NJCCCS or CCSS.
  • Align all assessments with district, school and department goals.
  • Make sure all the content in your SGO is covered in the assessment.
  • Incorporate test items that vary in levels of difficulty.
  • Include a sufficient number of test items to ensure rigor.
  • Collaboratively determine possible modifications to meet the needs of students.
  • Develop rubrics to assess essay responses.
  • Make sure content- and skill-based rubrics are specific and address multiple levels of proficiency.

http://www.state.nj.us/education/AchieveNJ/teacher/SGOGuidebook.pdf

  • 69
slide74

Common Assessments

  • Common formative assessments for learning can do for classroom teachers what large-scale assessments of learning, by design, cannot.
  • These are assessments collaboratively designed by a grade-level or department team that are administered to students by each participating teacher periodically throughout the year.
  • They assess student understanding of the particular standards that the grade-level or department educators are currently focusing on in their individual instructional programs.
  • The teachers collaboratively score the assessments, analyze the results, and discuss ways to achieve improvements in student learning on the next common assessment they will administer. In this way, assessment informs instruction.
  • If the common formative assessments are aligned to the large-scale assessments in terms of what students will need to know and be able to do on those assessments, the formative assessment results will provide valuable information regarding what students already know and what they need to learn. These assessments thus offer “predictive value” as to the results students are likely to produce on the large-scale assessments. Provided with this feedback early, educators can adjust instruction to better prepare students for success on the large-scale assessments.
slide75

Corrective Instruction

For assessments to become an integral part of the instructional process, teachers need to change their approach in three important ways. They must:

use assessments as sources of information for both students and teachers

follow assessments with high-quality corrective instruction, and

give students second chances to demonstrate success.

Thomas R. Guskey

2007

  • 75
slide76

Data-Driven Instruction +

Differentiation

Planning for All Students…

Struggling Students, ELL Students, Accelerated Students

Planning for Curriculum and Instruction

Students

Data

Instruction

Which instructional strategies work best for these students?

How do I manage a classroom with a wide range of readiness levels, learning styles and interests?

What have the students learned?

How do I manage student data?

What patterns do the data show?

How do I align curriculum with assessments?

  • 76
slide77

Instructional Strategies

Differentiating Instruction

In Response to Formative Assessments

  • 77
slide78

Teachers can differentiate through 4 ways:

Differentiated Instruction:

The Core of Instructional Practices

  • 78

Carol Ann Tomlinson (as cited by Ellis, Gable, Greg, & Rock, 2008, p. 32)

10 components of a comprehensive curriculum unit lesson or task
10 Components of a Comprehensive Curriculum Unit, Lesson, or Task

Content

Products

Assessment

Introduction

Teaching Strategies

  • Learning Activities

Grouping Strategies

Resources

Extension Activities

Modification

(Ascending Levels of Intellectual Demand)

Tomlinson, C.A., Kaplan, S. N., Renzulli, J. S., Purcell, J. H., Leppien, J. H., Burns, D. E., Strickland, C. A., Imbeau, M. B., (2009). The Parallel Curriculum Model. (2nd ed.).Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press.

  • 79
slide80

FEEDBACK

  • From the student's point of view, the formative assessment "script" reads like this:
  • What knowledge or skills do I aim to develop?
  • How close am I now?
  • What do I need to do next?

Good feedback contains information that a student

can use, which means that the student has to be able to hear and understand it.

  • 80
slide81

. . . our greatest opportunity for better

schools: a simple, unswerving focus on

those actions and arrangements that ensure effective, ever-improving instruction.

Instruction itself has the largest influence on achievement.

Mike Schmoker, Results Now (2006)

  • 81
slide82

ASSESSMENT ACTIVITY

Activity #4b: What Assessments are Utilized in Your School for Measuring Learner Progress?

Complete the chart on Pages 31-32.

and/or

Activity #4c: Considerations When Choosing or Developing a Quality Assessment

Complete the chart on Page 36.

  • 82
introducing the sgo blueprint context
Introducing the SGO Blueprint: Context

(Note: Adapted from: Rhode Island Department of Education (RIDE). Retrieved March 12, 2013 from: http://www.ride.ri.gov/EducatorQuality/EducatorEvaluation/SLO_Exemplars/Elem_FA-VisualArts.pdf)

  • 85
introducing the sgo blueprint student performance targets and self evaluation
Introducing the SGO Blueprint: Student Performance Targets and Self-Evaluation

Student Performance Targets and Self-Evaluation of SGO Achievement:

How will you define instructional success? Describe what you consider to be fair and reasonably challenging student and personal performance targets. The SGO score will represent 15% of your formal Summative Evaluation.

  • 92
data driven sgos
Data-Driven SGOs

Activity #5a: Building an SGO

  • 94
slide95

Assessment at a Glance

Mrs. Smith’s Class

slide97

REMINDER

  • Bring with you…
  • Resources
  • Standards (CCSS and NJCCCS)
  • Curriculum Guides
    • Grade Level
    • Course Syllabi
  • School Plans
    • School Improvement Plan
    • Consolidated Plan (Title 1)
  • District Assessments
    • Quarterly and Benchmark Tests
    • Performance Assessments
    • Portfolio Rubrics
  • Data
  • School Specific Data
  • Historical Test Data
  • Test Specifications
  • Data from District Assessments

Paper or online!

  • 97
day 1 reflection feedback
Day 1 -Reflection & Feedback

Pages 61-62

Participant’s Guide

  • 98
slide99

Developing Standards-Based, Assessment-Driven

Student Growth Objectives in ALL Content Areas

Day 2

  • 99
slide100

DAY 2 ---Today’s Agenda

Morning Session

  • A. Introductory Activity
  • Welcome
  • Today’s Meet
  • Truth or Confusion Activity
  • B. Data Considerations in Developing SGOs
  • Activity #5b: Building a SMART SGO
  • Mr. Adams – Grade 2 Literacy
  • BREAK (15 minutes)
  • C. Working Together to Develop SGOs: School-Content- and Grade Level Team-Based
  • Activity #6 - Strategic SGO Planning: Creating a SMART SGO
  • LUNCH (1 hour)
  • 100
slide101

Day 2 ---Today’s Agenda

Afternoon Session

  • Carousel/Gallery Walk- SGO Statements
  • Debrief/Groups Report Out- Examples from each content area shared with group
  • BREAK (15 minutes)
  • BREAK-OUT SESSIONS
  • INSTRUCTIONAL STAFF MEMBERS
  • Peer Review of Completed SGOs
  • Activity #7: Next Steps
  • Closing Activity
  • Feedback Form
  • Dismissal
  • ADMINISTRATORS
  • Principal Evaluation & the NJ State Practice Instrument for Evaluating Leadership
  • Activity: Evaluating an SGO
  • Activity: 4 Scenarios
  • Next Steps
  • Feedback Form
  • Dismissal
  • 101
let s review
Let’s Review!

TRUTH

OR

CONFUSION?

  • 102
slide104

TRUE

Teachers of tested subjects who have an SGP will develop one SGO. Teachers of non-tested subjects will write 2 SGOs.

  • 104
slide106

TRUE

The process of setting SGOs requires the creation of standards-aligned goals and assessments.

  • 106
slide108

CONFUSION!

  • The building principal provides final SGO approval.
  • SGOs are part of each teacher’s evaluation. Most principals’ evaluations include the school’s SGO average.
  • 108
slide109

The “A” in SMART goals stands for activities.

SMART goals focus on the number of differentiated classroom activities that a teacher provides.

  • 109
slide110

CONFUSION!

The SGO should focus on measuring outcomes NOT activities.

(The “A” represents Attainable / Ambitious!)

  • 110
slide112

TRUE

SGOs may be growth goals or achievement goals or a combination of both.

  • 112
slide113

A general SGO goal must focus on a teacher’s entire student population and a large proportion of curriculum standards and must set one general expectation for all students.

  • 113
slide114

CONFUSION!

There are two types of General SGOs – General and General-Tiered. The General-Tiered SGO tiers student goals by student preparation levels; hence, different expectations are set for different groupings of students.

  • 114
slide115

There are 2 types of Specific SGOs:

  • Specific – Student Group = focusing on subgroup of student with specific needs.
  • Specific – Content/Skill = focusing on specific skills of content that students must master.
  • 115
slide116

TRUE

NJDOE recommends that teachers who must develop 2 SGOs write one General SGO and one Specific SGO.

  • 116
slide117

Teacher attainment of SGOs will be based on a four point scale. Teachers who fully attain their Student Growth Objective will earn 3 points.

  • 117
slide118

TRUE

A teacher who has fully attained the SGO has “demonstrated a considerable impact on learning by meeting the objective” and will be awarded 3 points via a 4 point scale.

  • 118
slide119

Formative Assessment provides information to adjust teaching and learning while they are happening.

Summative Assessment determines at a point in time what students know and do not know. Summative Assessments are graded.

  • 119
slide120

TRUE

Formative Assessment is assessment for learning!

Summative Assessment is assessment of learning!

  • 120
slide121

The collaborative development of common assessments by teachers is a valid and professional practice.

  • 121
slide122

TRUE

Teachers via their PLC, grade level or department may collaboratively develop and score formative assessments to measure student understanding of particular standards.

  • 122
data driven sgos1
Data-Driven SGOs

Activity #5b: Building an SGO

  • 123
slide125

ACTIVITY #6

Strategic SGO Planning

next steps
Next Steps…

SGO

Review content area samples from NJDOE and other districts/

states.

  • 127
guiding the sgo conversation
Guiding the SGO Conversation
  • 128

Activity #7 – Strategic District and School Planning

slide129

Placeholder

Adele’s slide

slide132

BREAKOUT SESSION

Instructional

Staff

Breakout Session

next steps writing your own sgos
Next Steps… Writing Your Own SGOs

SGO

Review content area samples from NJDOE and other districts/

states.

Write your own SGOs.

  • 133
wrap it up
Wrap It Up!

Concluding Points

Precious Cargo…

SGO Inside!

  • 134
slide135

Reflect

Jot

Turn in

Please complete the

Feedback Form:

  • 135
slide136

BREAKOUT SESSION

Administrator Breakout Session

slide137

Revisiting Compliance:

Principal Evaluation

slide138

Principal Evaluation: Introduction

  • New evaluation systems for Principals will include the following components:

Principal Practice

Performance on a principal practice evaluation instrument

Eval. Leadshp.

Outputs that define how well a principal is leading imp. of the eval system

School SGP

State-calc. score that measures a principal’s ability to drive growth in ELA and math

Average SGO

Locally-calc. score that aggregates the perf. of all teachers in a school on SGOs

Admin. Goals

Locally-calc. score that measures a principal’s impact on stu. achievement

Summ. Rating

Overall eval. score that combines the multiple measures of practice & outcomes

Inputs

Student/Teacher Outcomes

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Principal Evaluation:

SGP and SGO Components

School SGP

  • Principals whose students have SGPs will receive the average school-wide SGP score.
  • Principals will be placed in 3 categories: Multi-Grade SGP Principal, Non-SGP Principal, Single-Grade SGP Principal. Component weighting will differ across categories.

SGO Average

  • Principals will be rated on their teachers’ success in achieving student growth objectives (SGOs) each year through an average of their teachers’ scores.
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Principal Evaluation:

A Look at All Components

Inputs

Student/

Teacher

Outcomes

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Principal Evaluation:

A Look at All Components

Inputs

Student/

Teacher

Outcomes

teacher attainment of sgos1
Teacher attainment of SGOs

NJDOE SGO

Performance Bands

Source: http://www.state.nj.us/education/AchieveNJ/teacher/SGOGuidebook.pdf

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Evaluating the SGO!

ELA SGO Analysis

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Principal Scenarios:

Potential Challenges

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Principal Scenario No. 1:

Fairness and Equity

At Top Notch Elementary School, teachers of grades K-3, teachers of special subject areas (art, music, etc.) and special education teachers with fewer than 20 students will set two SGO’s per State regulation. The superintendent determined that for consistency teachers of grades 4-5 will set two SGO’s as well. The 4th and 5th grade teachers are very upset because they already receive an additional measure of student achievement in the SGP score which is tied to their students’ performance on the NJ ASK. What’s a principal to do?

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Principal Scenario No. 2:

District v. School-based Decision

The superintendent of Prestige Public School District has designed and mandated a 4 point SGO scoring plan for all teachers that sets very high expectations.

Two of the district’s elementary schools have won National Blue Ribbon School designations. You are the principal of the third elementary school. Your school’s NJ ASK scores are historically lower. Seventy percent (70%) of your students qualify for free and reduced lunch. Fifty five percent (55%) are in the ELL program. Your annual student mobility rate is thirty three percent (33%). Your teachers are furious. They claim these expectations are unrealistic. What’s a principal to do?

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Principal Scenario No. 3:

Ethics

  • A group of high school teachers appears to be especially anxious about their students’ performance on SGO’s. They want to:
  • Set low SGO student expectations with limited rigor,
  • Address an area of apparent strength in their SGO objective,
  • Score their own students’ pre and post tests,
  • Report data via a small random sampling that they will control.
  • The principal is suspicious of the value, validity and integrity of their SGO plan. What’s a principal to do?
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Principal Scenario No. 4:

Accountability

You are the principal, the sole building-based administrator, in a school with 640 students and 77 teachers. You understand the SGO process and know that your own evaluation will incorporate your school’s SGO performance. You are apprehensive that you will not have enough time to oversee the SGO development, monitoring and outcome evaluation processes. What’s a principal to do?

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Table Talk: District and School Planning

Next Steps:

School and District

SGO Planning

wrap it up1
Wrap It Up!

Concluding Points

Precious Cargo…

SGO Inside!

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Reflect

Jot

Turn in

Please complete the

Feedback Form:

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Thank you

for your participation,

collaboration and dedicated efforts!!!

Wishing you much professional success

as you continue your work

in developing and implementing

Student Growth Objectives.