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Claim and Counterclaim . Persuasive/Argumentative Writing . November 4 th. Write the definition: A counter-argument is an argument opposed to your thesis, or part of your thesis. It expresses the view of a person who disagrees with your position. November 4 th.

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claim and counterclaim

Claim and Counterclaim

Persuasive/Argumentative Writing

november 4 th
November 4th
  • Write the definition:
  • A counter-argument is an argument opposed to your thesis, or part of your thesis. It expresses the view of a person who disagrees with your position.
november 4 th1
November 4th
  • Why would you include a counter-argument in your essay? Doesn’t that weaken your argument?
november 4 th pre ap
November 4th PRE-AP
  • Write the definition:
  • A counter-argument is an argument opposed to your thesis, or part of your thesis. It expresses the view of a person who disagrees with your position.
  • Why would you include a counter-argument in your essay? Doesn’t that weaken your argument?
bw answer
BW Answer
  • Actually, no. Done well, it makes the argument stronger. This is because it gives you the chance to respond to your reader’s objections before they have finished reading. It also shows that you are a reasonable person who has considered both sides of the debate. Both of these make an essay more persuasive.
tuesday november 5 th
Tuesday, November 5th
  • Not all evidence is created equal. You must evaluate, or judge your evidence.
  • 1. What does evaluate mean?
  • 2. What can be done to evaluate evidence?
bw answers
BW Answers
  • 1. What does evaluate mean?
  • Evaluate means to judge the worth.
  • 2. What can be done to evaluate evidence?
  • Ask if the evidence is- 1.) clearly related to the thesis 2.) a fact or expert opinion 3.)up to date 4.) unbiased and objective
tuesday november 5 th1
Tuesday, November 5th
  • 1. How can a counter-argument be rebutted, or disproven?
  • 2. What are faulty assumptions?
bw answer1
BW Answer
  • 1. One of the most effective ways to rebut a counter-argument is to show that it is based on faulty assumptions. Either the facts are wrong, the analysis is incorrect, or the values it is based on are not acceptable.
  • 2. Faulty assumptions are expectations or understandings that are based on incorrect facts or reasons that make no sense.
wednesday nov 6 th
Wednesday, Nov. 6th
  • Topic: You want to persuade your parents to get a dog.
  • 1. What could be one of their concerns?
  • 2. How could you respond to their counterargument?
wednesday nov 6 th1
Wednesday, Nov 6th
  • Topic: You want to persuade your parents to get a dog.
  • Your parent’s counterargument- The money we could save not getting a dog could go toward a family vacation.
  • 1. What is your response? Create a one-three sentence counterargument.
bw answer2
BW Answer
  • Possible Counterargument response:
  • “We would have more frequent family-bonding opportunities if we were taking care of a dog together. These would be low cost! Also, a compromise would be to go on a smaller, more inexpensive vacation and adopt a dog.”
thursday nov 7 th
Thursday, Nov. 7th
  • You are putting together an argument for year-round school. Evaluate the evidence. Write down the one that supports the argument, then explain why.
  • --using the building all year would be cost effective
  • --many people would have strong feelings about the change
thursday november 7 th
Thursday, November 7th
  • Cont’d- You are putting together an argument for year-round school.
  • Possible Evidence- continuing school without a long break would help students better remember what they learn.
  • 1. This could support your thesis IF what is done with the evidence?
bw answer3
BW Answer
  • 1. This could support your thesis IF the evidence is True! It needs to be verified (proven true) by a reliable source.
friday november 9 th
Friday, November 9th
  • 1. When should a counter-argument be conceded, or accepted?
  • 2. How can you agree with a counter-argument to your point but still maintain your stance?!
bw answer4
BW Answer
  • 1. When you find a counter-argument that is TRUE and it responds to your actual argument, you might need to agree with the point it makes.
  • Then you are faced with a choice: Do you abandon your thesis and adopt the counter-argument as your position?
  • 2. Often it turns out you don’t need to abandon your thesis, but you might need to modify or refine it.
  • Example of a modified thesis: Students should learn what causes bullying, but should not be constantly lectured that “bullies are bad people.” Instead, they should be taught the causes and motivations in a way that they find interesting and that lets them make their own judgments.
november 8 th
November 8th
  • Bellwork- get out your bellwork to study for a quiz!
bellwork quiz question 1
Bellwork Quiz- Question 1
  • 1. What does evaluate mean?
  • A. to understand
  • B. to break apart
  • C. to synthesize
  • D. to judge
  • E. to tell all about
question 2
Question 2
  • 2. A fact is statement that can be proven:
  • A. with persuasive writing
  • B. correct or incorrect
  • C. as a person’s view, belief, or way of thinking about something
  • D. incorrect
question 3
Question 3
  • 3. What is a counter-argument?
  • A. An argument opposed to your thesis, or part of your thesis.
  • B. Your secondary argument.
  • C. Added information to give a detailed response.
  • D. The same argument given by another writer.
question 4
Question 4
  • 4. What questions can be asked to evaluate evidence?
  • A. Is it a fact or expert opinion?
  • B. Is it up to date?
  • C. Is it unbiased and objective?
  • D. All of the above.
  • E. A and C only.
question 5
Question 5
  • 5. What is the definition of faulty assumptions?
  • A. assuming that doctors who cut people are criminals
  • B. expectations or understandings that are based on incorrect facts or reasons that make no sense.
  • C. assuming something about a person without asking them first
  • D. assumptions are wrong to think about others
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