WTO AND VIETNAM HIGHER EDUCATION REFORM THE ROLE OF GOVERNMENT - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

wto and vietnam higher education reform the role of government n.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
WTO AND VIETNAM HIGHER EDUCATION REFORM THE ROLE OF GOVERNMENT PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
WTO AND VIETNAM HIGHER EDUCATION REFORM THE ROLE OF GOVERNMENT

play fullscreen
1 / 18
WTO AND VIETNAM HIGHER EDUCATION REFORM THE ROLE OF GOVERNMENT
172 Views
Download Presentation
sonja
Download Presentation

WTO AND VIETNAM HIGHER EDUCATION REFORM THE ROLE OF GOVERNMENT

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript

  1. WTO AND VIETNAM HIGHER EDUCATION REFORMTHE ROLE OF GOVERNMENT Edilberto C de Jesus Secretariat Director Southeast Asian Ministers of Education Organization

  2. I. General Comments • Explicit focus on Higher Education • But Higher Education is only one of the five categories of education services identified under GATS

  3. I. General Comments • Involvement of trade and education officials at the highest levels • Normally, little interaction between the two ministries • Driving force for linkage--cross border education • Other ministries also have a stake in the issue: Foreign Affairs, Defense

  4. I. General Comments • Specific context of policy reform

  5. II. Cross Border Education • Not a new phenomenon for three of the four modes of supply • Consumption Abroad (Mode 2) • Presence of Natural Persons (Mode 4) • Commercial Presence (Mode 3) • Cross Border Supply

  6. II. Cross Border Education • Receptiveness to Cross Border Education • Cultural Values: high value attached to education • Colonial Influence

  7. II. Cross Border Education • New Elements • Scale • Commercial motivation

  8. III. Government and Education • Interests in Education • Human Resources Development • Civic Formation • Nation-Building

  9. III. Government and Education • Role • Patron • Steward • Direction • Quality • Rewards and Sanctions

  10. IV. Concerns of Government • Expanding access to education • Raising the quality of educational services • Obtaining professional services • Generating revenue • Projecting “Soft Power”

  11. V. Conclusions • Governments need to recognize the potential consequences of submitting to the GATS framework. • They become subject to a legally enforceable set of rules

  12. V. Conclusions • Adherence to GATS imposes some unconditional obligations • Most Favored Nation Treatment • Transparency

  13. V. Conclusions • Requires commitment to progressive liberalization • expanding coverage of sectors open to access • decreasing limitations on access

  14. V. Conclusions • The system allows for negotiations across sectors. Trade offs are possible, so that there are potential risks if the negotiations are conducted solely by trade ministers, without input from ministries of education.

  15. V. Conclusions • But GATS poses little immediate cause for concern. • Untested and still evolving • Many issues still require clarification • Education is not a priority sector for negotiators

  16. V. Conclusions • Technology and markets are moving much faster than GATS process. • Need for quality services • Sellers market • Availability of delivery systems • Less protectionist pressures

  17. V. Conclusions • Technology and markets are also moving faster than government bureaucracies. • Government efforts at structural changes. • Government difficulties in assuring oversight of on-line educational programs. • Concern with rogue providers.

  18. V. Conclusions • With or without GATS, governments must continue addressing education issues. • Developing data base • Deciding on policies • Building institutions • Strengthening its own higher education institutions