sonnet 116 n.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Sonnet 116 PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Sonnet 116

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 9

Sonnet 116 - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 164 Views
  • Uploaded on

Sonnet 116. Learning Objective: To understand the language & imagery of Sonnet 116. Summary. This sonnet attempts to define love, by telling both what it is and is not. Quatrain 1.

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'Sonnet 116' - solomon-ballard


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
sonnet 116

Sonnet 116

Learning Objective:

To understand the language & imagery of Sonnet 116.

summary
Summary
  • This sonnet attempts to define love, by telling both what it is and is not.
quatrain 1
Quatrain 1
  • In the first quatrain, the speaker says that love—”the marriage of true minds”—is perfect and unchanging; it does not “admit impediments,” and it does not change when it find changes in the loved one.
quatrain 2
Quatrain 2
  • The speaker tells what love is through a metaphor: a guiding star to lost ships (“wand’ring barks”) that is not susceptible to storms (it “looks on tempests and is never shaken”).
quatrain 3
Quatrain 3
  • The speaker again describes what love is not: it is not susceptible to time. Though beauty fades in time as rosy lips and cheeks come within “his bending sickle’s compass,” love does not change with hours and weeks: instead, it “bears it out ev’n to the edge of doom.”
the couplet
The Couplet
  • In the couplet, the speaker attests to his certainty that love is as he says: if his statements can be proved to be error, he declares, he must never have written a word, and no man can ever have been in love.
symbols
Symbols
  • Marriage
  • Navigation: love as a guiding star.
  • Time / age / death

Find a quote to go with each of these symbols!

death time
The macabre image of the Grim Reaper was quite familiar to Shakespeare’s Elizabethan readers. It became an icon of European culture in the medieval period, in which death was a horrifyingly present part of everyday life (due to the devastating impact of the Black Plague for that).

In this poem, Love is the one thing that can resist the power of death.

Death & Time