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FOODBORNE ILLNESS

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  1. FOODBORNE ILLNESS Mrs. Pereira Essentials of Cooking

  2. Foodborne Illness The World Health Organization (2011) defines foodborne illness as a preventable public health problem by agents that enter the body through eating contaminated food and water. These diseases can either be infectious or toxic in nature.

  3. Incidence of Foodborne Illnesses Each year in the United States, 31 known foodborne pathogens cause: • 9.4 million illnesses • 55, 961 hospitalizations • 1,351deaths Scallen, E., et al, 2011

  4. CategoriesofFoodborne Pathogens • Viruses • Bacteria • Parasites • Toxins

  5. The most common culprits of food borne illnesses • Campylobacter – second most common bacterialcause of diarrhea in the U.S. • Norovirus– leading viral cause of diarrhea in the U.S. Salmonella – most common bacterial cause of diarrhea in the U.S. and most common cause of foodborne deaths CDC, 2010

  6. The most common culprits of food borne illnesses • E coli/STEC – produces a deadly toxin and causes 73,000 cases of foodborne illness/yr in the U.S. • Clostridium botulinum– produces a toxin that causes life threatening illness that can compromise breathing • CDC, 2010

  7. At risk populations • Elderly • Persons with chronic diseases • Young Children • Infants • Unborn babies • Pregnant women Thobaben, 2010 NDDIC, 2007

  8. Signs/Symptoms and Sources of pathogens (organisms)

  9. Foodborne Illnesses Leading causes of Illnesses: Leading causes of hospitalization: Salmonella Norovirus Campylobacter Toxoplasmagondii Escherichia (E coli) • Norovirus • Salmonella • Clostridium perfringens • Campylobacter • Staphylococcus aureus Leading causes of DEATH: • Salmonella • Toxoplasmagondii • Listeriamonocytogenes • Norovirus • Campylobacter

  10. Globally: Foodborne Illnesses • Significant increases in foodborne illness incidence • Globally, 1.8 million people died from diarrhoeal diseases in 1998 • 30% increase in the number of foodborne diseases reported in developed countries WHO, 2011

  11. Consumer Preventive Measures • Remain out of the “Danger Zone” • Four easy basic steps: Clean Separate Cook Chill • Don’t buy damaged foods, i.e. can goods, fresh produce/vegetables, etc • Wash fresh produce and vegetables thoroughly under running water USDA, 2008

  12. Prevention tips

  13. Questions????

  14. Post test • Identify two population groups at increased risk for foodborne illness • Name two common pathogens causing foodborne illness • Name three leading foodborne causes of death • Name three preventive measures

  15. References • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (CDC). CDC estimates the number of food borne illnesses in the U.S. Retrieved from http://www.cdc.gov/foodborneburden/questions-and-answers.html • CDC 2010 Food borne burden retreived from http://www.cdc.gov/foodborneburden/questions-and-answers.html • CDC 2010 Estimates of food borne Illness in the US. http://www.cdc.gov/foodborneburden/questions-and-answers.html • CDC Trends in foodborne illnesses in the U.S. , 1996-2009 (2010) http://www.cdc.gov/foodborneburden/trends-in-foodborne-illness.html#highlights • CDC, 2011 CDC and Food safety http://www.cdc.gov/foodborneburden/cdc-and-food-safety.html • Definition. World Health Organization (2011). Food Safety and foodborne illnesses. Retrieved from http://www.who.int/mediacentre/factsheets/fs237/en/ • Federal Drug Administration (FDA).(2011). Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA). Retrieved from http://www.fda.gov/Food/FoodSafety/FSMA/default.htm

  16. References • Flint, J.A., Van Duynhoven, Y.T., Angulo, F.J., DeLong, S.M., Braun, P., Kirk, M., Scallen, E., Fitzgerald, M., Adak, G.K., Sockett, P., Ellis, A., Hall, G., Gargouri, N., Walke, H., Braam, P. ((2005). Estimating the burden of acute gastroenteritis, foodborne disease, and pathogens commonly transmitted by food: An international review. Clinical Infectious Disease. 41:698-704. Retrieved from http://dels-old.nas.edu/banr/gates1/docs/mtg5docs/bgdocs/Estimating_burden.pdf • Food Technology Service, Inc (FTSI). (2006-2011). Food borne illness is a worldwide health problem. Retrieved from http://www.foodtech.us/aboutfoodirr.asp • Kaferstein, F.K., Motarjemi, Y., and Bettcher, D.W. (1997). Foodborne Disease Control: A Transnational Challenge. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 3(4). Retreived from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2640096/pdf/9368787.pdf • Kowalcyk, B. (2011). Food Safety Law Makes History. Federal Drug Administration (FDA) Center for Food borne illness. Retrieved from http://www.huffingtonpost.com/barbara-kowalcyk/food-safety-bill-history_b_805283.html

  17. References • National Digestive Diseases Information Clearinghouse (NDDIC).(2007). Bacteria and Foodborne Illness. Retrieved from http://digestive.niddk.nih.gov/ddiseases/pubs/bacteria/#4 • Scallen, E., Hoekstra, R.M., Angulo, F. J., Tauxe, R. V., Widdowson, M.A., Roy, S.L.., Jones, J.L., and Griffin, P.M. (2011). Foodborne Illness Acquired in the United States – Major Pathogens. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 17(1). Retrieved from http://web.ebscohost.com.ezp.waldenulibrary.org/ehost/pdfviewer/pdfviewer?sid=8d0d5293-6011-407c-b3c8-7d0c7261cd8a%40sessionmgr113&vid=6&hid=104 • The Partnership for Food Safety and Education (PFSE). (2010). The Costs of Foodborne Illnesses. Retrieved from http://www.fightbac.org/about-foodborne-illness/costs-to-society • Tauxe, R.V. (1997). Emerging Foodborne diseases: an evolving public health challenge. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 3(4). Retrieved from http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/eid/vol3no4/tauxe.htm • Thobaben, M. (2010). Causes and Prevention of Foodborne Illness. Home Healthcare Management & Practice. 22(7): 533-535. DOI: 10.1177/1084822310376611. Retrieved from http://hhc.sagepub.com.ezp.waldenulibrary.org/content/22/7/533.full.pdf+html

  18. References • World Health Organization (WHO). (2011). Drug Resistant Salmonella. Retrieved from http://www.who.int/mediacentre/factsheets/fs139/en/ • World Health Organization (WHO). (2011). Food Safety and Foodborne Illness. Retrieved from http://www.who.int/mediacentre/factsheets/fs237/en • Vilsack, T. and Sebelius, K. (2009). Press Release: New Strategies to keeping America’s food supply safe. Retreived from http://www.epa.gov/agingepa/press/othernews/2009/2009_0731_ons_2.htm • U.S. Department of Agriculture. (USDA)(2011). Foodborne Illness and Disease. Retrieved from http://www.fsis.usda.gov/Fact_Sheets/Foodborne_Illness_What_Consumers_Need_to_Know/index.asp • U.S. Department of Agriculture. (USDA)(2008). Food Safety Education. Retrieved from http://www.fsis.usda.gov/Fact_Sheets/At_Risk_&_Underserved_Fact_Sheets/index.asp • Wottecki, C.E. and Kineman, B.D. (2003). Challenges and approaches to reducing foodborne illness. Annual Review of Nutrition. 23: 315-344. Retrieved from http://web.ebscohost.com.ezp.waldenulibrary.org/ehost/detail?vid=11&hid=104&sid=8d0d5293-6011-407c-b3c8-7d0c7261cd8a%40sessionmgr113&bdata=JnNpdGU9ZWhvc3QtbGl2ZSZzY29wZT1zaXRl#db=rzh&AN=2004033589