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7th Annual NYC PBIS Leadership Summit June 13, 2014 . Capacity Building to Support Positive School Climate and Improve Outcomes for All Students. Lucille Eber, Statewide Director Illinois PBIS Network and National PBIS TA Center. BIG Ideas for Today.

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lucille eber statewide director illinois pbis network and national pbis ta center
7th Annual

NYC PBIS

Leadership Summit

June 13, 2014

Capacity Building to Support

Positive School Climate and

Improve Outcomes for All Students

Lucille Eber, Statewide Director

Illinois PBIS Network and National PBIS TA Center

slide2
BIG Ideas for Today
  • MTSS in NYC – Celebration and Opportunities
  • Connections to National Efforts and Opportunities
  • Partnerships to enhance MTSS
    • impact on ALL students
    • ”A Shared Path to Success”
connections and partnerships
Connections and Partnerships
  • Understanding how academics and behavior connect
danielson s framework for teaching
Danielson’s Framework for Teaching

Planning and Preparation

Professional

Responsibilities

Classroom

Environment

Instruction

Professional responsibilities and behavior in and out of the classroom.

What a teacher knows and does in preparation for teaching.

All aspects of teaching that lead to a culture for learning in the classroom.

What a teacher does to engage students in learning.

4

danielson domain 2 classroom environment
Danielson Domain 2: Classroom Environment
  • 2a- Creating an Environment of Rapport and Respect
  • 2b- Establishing a Culture for Learning
  • 2c- Managing Classroom Procedures
  • 2d- Managing Student Behavior
  • 2e- Organizing Physical Space
domain 2d managing student behavior
Domain 2d: Managing Student Behavior
  • Indicators:
  • Clear standards of conduct, possibly posted, and possible referred to during a lesson
  • Absence of acrimony between teacher and students concerning behavior
  • Teacher awareness of student conduct
  • Preventive action when needed by teacher
  • Absence of misbehavior
  • Reinforcement of positive behavior
new federal guidance on school discipline and discrimination
New Federal Guidance on School Discipline and Discrimination
  • U.S. Departments of Education and Justice collaborative Supportive School Discipline Initiative refocusing school discipline:
      • To create safe, positive, equitable schools
      • Emphasize prevention and positive approaches to keep students in school and learning

For Guidance Package and Additional Resources: http://www2.ed.gov/policy/gen/guid/school-discipline/index.html

ED MH JJ

Partnerships

new federal guidance on school discipline and discrimination1
New Federal Guidance on School Discipline and Discrimination
  • U.S. Departments of Education and Justice collaborative Supportive School Discipline Initiative refocusing school discipline:
      • To create safe, positive, equitable schools
      • Emphasize prevention and positive approaches to keep students in school and learning

For Guidance Package and Additional Resources: http://www2.ed.gov/policy/gen/guid/school-discipline/index.html

Zero Tolerance Does NOT Work…

….Results in Inequity

monitoring equity
Monitoring Equity
  • To improve outcomes for ALL students, important to track the most vulnerable to determine effectiveness of multi-tiered systems of behavior support.
    • Ethnicity
    • Disability
    • Ethnicity & Disability
impact of pbis on students with disabilities
Impact of PBIS on Students with Disabilities
  • Nationally, students with disabilities suspended from school at TWICE the rate of non-disabled peers (Losen & Gillespie, 2012).
  • At greater risk of academic failure and drop out of school.
school wide systems for student success multi tiered support systems
School-Wide Systems for Student Success:Multi-tiered Support Systems

Academic Systems

Behavioral Systems

  • Tier 3/Tertiary Interventions 1-5%
  • Individual students
  • Assessment-based
  • High intensity
  • 1-5% Tier 3/Tertiary Interventions
          • FBA-BIP
          • Parent Training and Collaboration
          • Wraparound Systems of Care
  • 5-15% Tier 2/Secondary Interventions
          • Check In, Check Out
          • Behavior Contracts
          • Daily home/school notes
          • Small group social skills training
          • Some individualizing
  • Tier 2/Secondary Interventions 5-15%
  • Some students (at-risk)
  • High efficiency
  • Rapid response
  • Small group interventions
  • Some individualizing
  • Tier 1/Universal Interventions 80-90%
  • All students
  • Preventive, proactive
  • 80-90% Tier 1/Universal Interventions
          • Core Behavioral and SEL curriculum (School and Class-wide)
          • Social Skills Teaching and Reinforcement Systems
          • All Students/ All Environments

Adapted from llinoisPBIS Network, Revised May 15, 2008. Adapted from “What is school-wide PBS?” OSEP Technical Assistance Center on Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports. Accessed at http://pbis.org/schoolwide.htm

mtss behavior positive behavior intervention support www pbis org
MTSS-BehaviorPositive Behavior Intervention & Support (www.pbis.org)

Currently in over 20,000 schools nationwide

  • Decision making framework to guide selection and implementation of best practices for improving academic and behavioral functioning
    • Data based decision making
    • Measurable outcomes
    • Evidence-based practices
    • Systems to support effective implementation
advantages
Advantages
  • Promotes effective decision making
  • Improves climate & learning environment
  • Changes adult behavior
  • Reduces punitive approaches
  • Reduces OSS and ODRs
  • Improves student academic performance
reducing suspensions for students with disabilities
Reducing Suspensions for Students with Disabilities
  • Data were analyzed from 166 IL elementary schools over 3 years.
    • Students with disabilities had a 72% reduction in OSSs , and
    • Students without disabilities also had substantial 59% reduction.
  • Go to www.pbisillinois.org/publications/reports
reduced suspensions for students with disabilities in middle schools
Reduced Suspensions for Students with Disabilities in Middle Schools
  • A 72 % decrease in OSSs for students without disabilities, on par with a 68% decrease for students with disabilities .
    • Steadily reduced risk of suspensions for students with disabilities.
2 danville ccsd 118 middle schools success for students with disabilities
2 Danville CCSD 118 Middle Schools Success for Students with Disabilities
    • OSSs declined by 56% for students with disabilities, and 27% for students without disabilities.
  • Students with disabilities were less likely to be suspended than students without disabilities.
slide20
Capacity-Building for Multi-tiered Systems of Support

Behavioral Prevention Multi-Tiered Systems Support

(DSISS, RSE-TASC, OSYD, OSS, School Health/ Mental Health)

Leadership Team

Active Coordination with Clusters and Cross-Functional Teams at Networks

Behavioral Expertise

Training

Coaching

Evaluation

PBIS School Exemplars and

Lab Sites

more specifically
More Specifically:
  • How schools can expand their continuum of multi-tiered systems of behavioral support;
  • With the goal of a stronger prevention and intervention systems to address the mental health needs of all students?

Build deliberate partnerships with mental health

and other community Partners and providers?

a foundation but more is needed
A Foundation…but More is Needed…
  • Many schools implementing PBIS struggle to implement effective interventions at Tiers 2 and 3.
  • Youth with “internalizing” issues may go undetected.
  • PBIS systems (although showing success in social climate and discipline) often do not address broader community data and mental health prevention.
a more mainstream conversation mental h ealth
A more “mainstream” conversationMental Health
  • More awareness of the need to do more.
  • A recognition that schools have a role.
  • A need to increase access.
  • But outcomes are more than access.
  • Prevention, as well as access.
the context for needed partnerships
The Context for Needed Partnerships :
  • One in 5 youth have a MH “condition”.
  • About 70% of those get no treatment.
  • School is “defacto” MH provider.
  • Juvenile Justice system is next level of system default.
  • Suicide is 4th leading cause of death among young adults.
  • Factors that impact mental health occur “round the clock”.
  • It is challenging for educators to address the factors beyond school.
  • It is challenging for community providers to address the factors in school.
slide26
Tertiary Prevention:

Specialized

Individualized

Systems for Students with High-Risk Behavior

SCHOOL-WIDE

POSITIVE BEHAVIOR INTERVENTIONS and

SUPPORT

5%

Secondary Prevention:

Specialized Group

Systems for Students with At-Risk Behavior

15%

Primary Prevention:

School-/Classroom-

Wide Systems for

All Students,

Staff, & Settings

80% of Students

mh community partners embedded within the system
MH/Community Partners Embedded within the System
  • Need to expand current continuum of interventions and data sources used.
  • Push forward with Innovations.
  • BUT…use the logic of Implementation Science and use Data…
connections and partnerships1
Connections and Partnerships
  • OSEP National PBIS Technical Assistance Center (pbis.org)
  • Center for School Mental Health (csmh.umaryland.edu)
  • NASDSE (ideapartnership.org)
  • National COP for SBH (sharedwork.org)
slide29
Advancing Education Effectiveness: Interconnecting School Mental Health and

School-Wide Positive Behavior Support

Editors: Susan Barrett,

Lucille Eberand Mark Weist

slide30
Development of an Interconnected Systems Framework for School Mental Health
  • Access on the Center for School Mental Health or National PBIS websites:
    • http://csmh.umaryland.edu/Resources/ Reports/SMHPBISFramework.pdf
    • http://www.pbis.org/school/school_mental_health/interconnected_systems.aspx
    • Edited by: Susan Barrett and Lucille Eber, National PBIS Center Partners; and Mark Weist, University of South Carolina (and Senior Advisor to the University of Maryland, Center for School Mental Health)
isf defined
ISF Defined
  • Structure and process for education and mental health systems to interact in most effective and efficient way.
  • Guided by key stakeholders in education and mental health/community systems.
  • Who have the authority to reallocate resources, change role and function of staff, and change policy.
isf defined1
ISF Defined
  • Tiered prevention logic.
  • Cross system problem solving teams.
  • Use of data to decide which evidence based practices to implement.
  • Progress monitoring for both fidelity and impact.
  • Active involvement by youth, families, and other school and community stakeholders.
slide33
A MH counselor is housed in a school building 1 day a week to “see” students.

MH person participates in teams at all 3 tiers.

Traditional  Preferred

slide34
No data to decide on or monitor interventions.

MH person leads group or individual interventions based on data.

Traditional  Preferred

slide35
School personnel only attempting to “do mental health”.

A blended team of school and community providers “divide and conquer” based on strengths of our team.

Traditional  Preferred

school data community data s tudent and system level
School Data  Community DataStudent and System Level

Academic (Benchmark, GPA, Credit accrual etc)

Discipline

Attendance

Climate/Perception

Visits to Nurse, Social Worker, Counselor, etc.

Screening from one view

Community Demographics

Food Pantry Visits

Protective and Risk Factors

Calls to crisis centers, hospital visits

Screening at multiple views

nyc pz school outcome data
NYC PZ School Outcome Data

All schools had improved attendance

Data obtained from NYCDOE website

nyc pz school outcome data ela
NYC PZ School Outcome Data- ELA

60% of PZ schools increased the percentages of students at

Levels 3&4 from 2011 and 2012

60% of PZ schools reduced the percentage of students at Level 1 from 2011 and 2012

80% of PZ schools reduced percentage of students at Level 2 from 2011 and 2012

NY State English

Language Arts

Exam

Percentage of Students

All Students

In 3rd to 8th

Grades

Data obtained from NYCDOE website

promise zone student outcome
Promise Zone Student Outcome

PZ STUDENTS WITH IMPROVED ATTENDANCE

# DAYS GAINED

Equivalent to 2.52 School Years

Data obtained from ARIS N=109

mh community partners embedded throughout the system all tiers
MH/Community Partners Embedded throughout the System (all Tiers)
  • Need to expand current continuum of interventions and data sources used to guide system design.
  • Be creative, be brave, push forward with innovations.
  • If the “rules’ don’t work, find ways to change them!
  • BUT….make careful choices based on data.
  • Partner to evaluate the practices that expand access and options.
where do specific mh interventions fit
Where do specific “MH” Interventions Fit?

That depends on the data of the school and community

Examples of Expanded View of data:

  • Child welfare contacts
  • Violence rates
  • Incarceration rates
  • Deployed families
  • Homeless families
  • Unemployment spikes
slide44
Tertiary Prevention:

Specialized

Individualized

Systems for Students with High-Risk Behavior

SCHOOL-WIDE

POSITIVE BEHAVIOR INTERVENTIONS and

SUPPORT

5%

Secondary Prevention:

Specialized Group

Systems for Students with At-Risk Behavior

15%

Primary Prevention:

School-/Classroom-

Wide Systems for

All Students,

Staff, & Settings

80% of Students

trauma
Trauma
  • Death/loss of a loved one
  • Abuse/neglect
  • Car accident
  • Chronic poverty
  • Community violence
  • Bullying
  • Medical illness
  • Natural disaster

“Trauma is a fact of life. It does not, however, have to be a life sentence.” — Peter A. Levine, Ph.D. Levine, P. (2012). In an unspoken voice: How the body releases trauma and restores goodness. Berkley, CA: North Atlantic Books.

complex trauma domains
Complex Trauma Domains
  • Affect and Behavioral Regulation
  • Attention/Consciousness
  • Self-Perception
  • Relationships
  • Somatization
  • Systems of Meaning

DeRosa, R., Habib, M., Pelcovitz, D., Rathus, J., Sonnenklar, J., Ford, J., Kaplan, S. (2005). SPARCS: Structured Psychotherapy for Adolescents Responding to Chronic Stress: A Trauma-Focused Guide. Great Neck, NY: North Shore-Long Island Jewish Health system, Inc.

facilitation techniques for instructional groups
Facilitation Techniques for Instructional Groups
  • Psychoeducation
    • Skill based
  • Role-Play
  • Group Discussion
  • Games
  • Experiential Instruction
  • Teambuilding/Group Cohesion
a typical group instructional session
A Typical Group Instructional Session
  • Check-In
  • Practice from Last Session
  • Mindfulness Exercise
  • Session-specific Content and Activities
    • Example: Bottle about to Burst
  • Check-Out
  • Remind to Practice

DeRosa, R., Habib, M., Pelcovitz, D., Rathus, J., Sonnenklar, J., Ford, J., Kaplan, S. (2005). SPARCS: Structured

Psychotherapy for Adolescents Responding to Chronic Stress: A Trauma-Focused Guide. Great Neck, NY: North Shore-Long Island Jewish Health system, Inc.

schools and mental health a true collaboration
Schools and Mental Health: A True Collaboration
  • “Upper Tier 2” intervention.
  • We sit on the Tier 2 team.
  • School staff identify students.
  • School staff make initial contact with parents/guardians.
  • We screen and assess students.
  • Co-facilitate SPARCS groups.
slide50
Remain Open to Thinking Differently

About Systems

About Data

About Practices

slide53
Illinois Balanced and Restorative Justice

Restorative Practices in Schools are inspired by the philosophy and practices of restorative justice, which puts repairing harm done to relationships and people over and above the need for assigning blame and dispensing punishment.

goals of restorative justice in schools gonsoulin schiff and hatheway 2013
Goals of restorative justice in schools (Gonsoulin, Schiff, and Hatheway 2013):
  • Create a restorative and inclusive school climate rather than a punitive one;
  • Decrease suspensions, expulsions, and disciplinary referrals by holding youth accountable for their actions through repairing harm and making amends;
  • Include persons who have harmed, been harmed, and their surrounding community in restorative responses to school misconduct;
  • Reengage youth at risk of academic failure and juvenile justice system entry through dialogue-driven, restorative responses to school misbehavior.
the restorative chat used by administrators when processing suspensions with students
Illinois Balanced and Restorative JusticeThe Restorative Chat:used by Administrators when processing suspensions with Students
  • Tell me what happened.
  • What were you thinking at the time?
  • What do you think about it now?
  • Who did this affect?
  • What do you need to do about it?
  • How can we make sure this doesn’t happen again?
  • What can I do to help you?
slide56
A CONTINUUM OF RESTORATIVE PRACTICES

A CONTINUUM OF SWPBIS PRACTICES

  • Intensive Intervention
  • Return from suspension
  • Administrative transfer or school crime diversion:
  • Victim offender meetings
  • Family/community group conferences
  • Restitution
  • Intensive Intervention
  • Function-based support
  • Wraparound support

~5%

~15%

  • Early Intervention
  • Alternatives to suspension:
  • Youth/peer court
  • Peer mediation
  • Conflict resolution training
  • Restitution
  • Early Intervention
  • Check-in/ Check-out
  • Social Skills Curricula
  • Prevention & Skill Building
  • Define and teach expectations
  • Establish consequence system
  • Collection and use of data
  • Prevention & Skill Building
  • Peace-keeping circles for:
  • Morning meetings
  • Social/emotional instruction
  • Staff meetings

~80% of Students

alton hs integration of restorative justice enhances tier 2 supports
Alton HS Integration of Restorative Justice Enhances Tier 2 Supports
  • After-school group initiated to reduce OSSs for students with substance or physical aggression related discipline referrals
    • FY12 - 67% of students completed the program
    • FY13 - 73% of students completed program when enhanced by restorative practices
slide59
The Context May Change…

Who Delivers the Messages….

Who funds the work….

What we call what we do…..

Keep Consistent with the

core features of what works!

slide60
Bob
  • 1st Grade student
  • Was in the district for Kindergarten and did not present with any behavioral problems
  • During the fall of first grade, Bob, would run out of the classroom and hide in the school. 911 had to be called on one occasion. The district also called MH Crisis Team and the student was out of school for 10 days via the DMH crisis program
  • Parents refused a partial day program. A referral for special education testing was made.
slide61
Since staff was participating in the FBA/BIP training series, they decided to begin the FBA/BIP process for this student while the case study was occurring.
  • The district coach stated that the reasons for beginning this process was because the district was “ready to outplace the student”.
slide64
Bob
  • IEP was finalized in December – OHI for ADHD
  • Parents did not want/agree tomedication
  • Bob was moved to a co-taught classroom to start his day.
  • He is in regular education 80% of his day.
progress data
Progress data
  • CICO DPR data – 80% of points except on 2 days
  • Prior to the intervention and IEP – Out of school for 10 full days. Post – left early for 1 day due to behavior
  • Academic information: Bob did not progress academically during the fall. After January he has started to make progress and complete assignments.
guiding students to positive behavior
Guiding Students to Positive Behavior

The most critical step to building a safe, respectful, and productive learning environment is establishing a positive school climate where students and adults have strong, positive relationships and students understand what is expected of them as learners at school.

Schools should nurture students by providing them with positive behavioral supports and meaningful opportunities for improving social and emotional skills, such as recognizing and managing emotions, developing caring and concern for others, making responsible decisions, establishing positive relationships, and handling challenging situations in a constructive way.

School principals and staff members must establish and maintain a positive school climate and must effectively communicate, teach, and model the positive behaviors they expect students to exhibit in the classroom and in other parts of the school throughout the day.

balanced and restorative justice strategies
BALANCED AND RESTORATIVE JUSTICE STRATEGIES

Balanced and restorative justice strategies are ways of thinking about and

responding to conflicts and problems by involving all participants to identify what

happened, describe how it affected everyone, and find solutions to make things right.

These strategies are also called “Restorative Justice” and “Restorative Practices.”

The following is a listing of generally accepted restorative strategies. These

strategies may be used at the discretion of the principal in lieu of, or in addition to,

certain other interventions set forth in the SCC, when all parties voluntarily agree

to participate and the appropriate resources are available to support meaningful

effort. This list is not exhaustive of all balanced and restorative justice strategies.

A guide for implementing these strategies is available by contacting the Department

of Youth Development and Positive Behavior Supports at 553-1830.

restorative practices
RESTORATIVE PRACTICES

2013-2014 CPS OSEL Restorative Practice Guidelines

the need to be plan ful
2 – 4 YearsThe Need to Be Plan-ful:

Implementation occurs in stages:

  • Exploration-Adoption
  • Installation
  • Initial Implementation
  • Full Implementation
  • Innovation
  • Sustainability

Fixsen, Naoom, Blase, Friedman, & Wallace, 2005

nyc discipline code
NYC Discipline Code
  • “Each school is expected to promote a positive school culture and climate that provides students with a supportive environment in which to grow both socially and academically. Schools are expected to take a proactive role in nurturing students’ pro-social behavior by providing them with a range of positive behavioral supports as well as meaningful opportunities for social emotional learning.”
  • “Establishing a school-wide tiered framework of behavioral supports and interventions guides the entire school community toward following the school’s rules and expectations, as well as the delivery of consistent and appropriate consequences, e.g., PBIS (Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports).”
slide72
Capacity-Building for Multi-tiered Systems of Support

Behavioral Prevention Multi-Tiered Systems Support

(DSISS, RSE-TASC, OSYD, OSS, School Health/ Mental Health)

Leadership Team

Active Coordination with Clusters and Cross-Functional Teams at Networks

Behavioral Expertise

Training

Coaching

Evaluation

PBIS School Exemplars and

Lab Sites

slide73
The knowledge, the skills and the expertise

for the evidence-base for ensuring effective

school climate, supportive mental health and

preventive discipline is in this room!

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