Lucille Eber, Statewide Director Illinois PBIS Network and National PBIS TA Center - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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Lucille Eber, Statewide Director Illinois PBIS Network and National PBIS TA Center

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  1. 7th Annual NYC PBIS Leadership Summit June 13, 2014 Capacity Building to Support Positive School Climate and Improve Outcomes for All Students Lucille Eber, Statewide Director Illinois PBIS Network and National PBIS TA Center

  2. BIG Ideas for Today • MTSS in NYC – Celebration and Opportunities • Connections to National Efforts and Opportunities • Partnerships to enhance MTSS • impact on ALL students • ”A Shared Path to Success”

  3. Connections and Partnerships • Understanding how academics and behavior connect

  4. Danielson’s Framework for Teaching Planning and Preparation Professional Responsibilities Classroom Environment Instruction Professional responsibilities and behavior in and out of the classroom. What a teacher knows and does in preparation for teaching. All aspects of teaching that lead to a culture for learning in the classroom. What a teacher does to engage students in learning. 4

  5. Danielson Domain 2: Classroom Environment • 2a- Creating an Environment of Rapport and Respect • 2b- Establishing a Culture for Learning • 2c- Managing Classroom Procedures • 2d- Managing Student Behavior • 2e- Organizing Physical Space

  6. Domain 2d: Managing Student Behavior • Indicators: • Clear standards of conduct, possibly posted, and possible referred to during a lesson • Absence of acrimony between teacher and students concerning behavior • Teacher awareness of student conduct • Preventive action when needed by teacher • Absence of misbehavior • Reinforcement of positive behavior

  7. Education and JusticeSetting the Stage for Opportunity

  8. New Federal Guidance on School Discipline and Discrimination • U.S. Departments of Education and Justice collaborative Supportive School Discipline Initiative refocusing school discipline: • To create safe, positive, equitable schools • Emphasize prevention and positive approaches to keep students in school and learning For Guidance Package and Additional Resources: http://www2.ed.gov/policy/gen/guid/school-discipline/index.html ED MH JJ Partnerships

  9. New Federal Guidance on School Discipline and Discrimination • U.S. Departments of Education and Justice collaborative Supportive School Discipline Initiative refocusing school discipline: • To create safe, positive, equitable schools • Emphasize prevention and positive approaches to keep students in school and learning For Guidance Package and Additional Resources: http://www2.ed.gov/policy/gen/guid/school-discipline/index.html Zero Tolerance Does NOT Work… ….Results in Inequity

  10. Monitoring Equity • To improve outcomes for ALL students, important to track the most vulnerable to determine effectiveness of multi-tiered systems of behavior support. • Ethnicity • Disability • Ethnicity & Disability

  11. Impact of PBIS on Students with Disabilities • Nationally, students with disabilities suspended from school at TWICE the rate of non-disabled peers (Losen & Gillespie, 2012). • At greater risk of academic failure and drop out of school.

  12. School-Wide Systems for Student Success:Multi-tiered Support Systems Academic Systems Behavioral Systems • Tier 3/Tertiary Interventions 1-5% • Individual students • Assessment-based • High intensity • 1-5% Tier 3/Tertiary Interventions • FBA-BIP • Parent Training and Collaboration • Wraparound Systems of Care • 5-15% Tier 2/Secondary Interventions • Check In, Check Out • Behavior Contracts • Daily home/school notes • Small group social skills training • Some individualizing • Tier 2/Secondary Interventions 5-15% • Some students (at-risk) • High efficiency • Rapid response • Small group interventions • Some individualizing • Tier 1/Universal Interventions 80-90% • All students • Preventive, proactive • 80-90% Tier 1/Universal Interventions • Core Behavioral and SEL curriculum (School and Class-wide) • Social Skills Teaching and Reinforcement Systems • All Students/ All Environments Adapted from llinoisPBIS Network, Revised May 15, 2008. Adapted from “What is school-wide PBS?” OSEP Technical Assistance Center on Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports. Accessed at http://pbis.org/schoolwide.htm

  13. MTSS-BehaviorPositive Behavior Intervention & Support (www.pbis.org) Currently in over 20,000 schools nationwide • Decision making framework to guide selection and implementation of best practices for improving academic and behavioral functioning • Data based decision making • Measurable outcomes • Evidence-based practices • Systems to support effective implementation

  14. Students with IEPs Succeed as Schools Build Tier 2 Capacity

  15. Advantages • Promotes effective decision making • Improves climate & learning environment • Changes adult behavior • Reduces punitive approaches • Reduces OSS and ODRs • Improves student academic performance

  16. Reducing Suspensions for Students with Disabilities • Data were analyzed from 166 IL elementary schools over 3 years. • Students with disabilities had a 72% reduction in OSSs , and • Students without disabilities also had substantial 59% reduction. • Go to www.pbisillinois.org/publications/reports

  17. Reduced Suspensions for Students with Disabilities in Middle Schools • A 72 % decrease in OSSs for students without disabilities, on par with a 68% decrease for students with disabilities . • Steadily reduced risk of suspensions for students with disabilities.

  18. 2 Danville CCSD 118 Middle Schools Success for Students with Disabilities • OSSs declined by 56% for students with disabilities, and 27% for students without disabilities. • Students with disabilities were less likely to be suspended than students without disabilities.

  19. MTSS Implementation Logic

  20. Capacity-Building for Multi-tiered Systems of Support Behavioral Prevention Multi-Tiered Systems Support (DSISS, RSE-TASC, OSYD, OSS, School Health/ Mental Health) Leadership Team Active Coordination with Clusters and Cross-Functional Teams at Networks Behavioral Expertise Training Coaching Evaluation PBIS School Exemplars and Lab Sites

  21. More Specifically: • How schools can expand their continuum of multi-tiered systems of behavioral support; • With the goal of a stronger prevention and intervention systems to address the mental health needs of all students? Build deliberate partnerships with mental health and other community Partners and providers?

  22. A Foundation…but More is Needed… • Many schools implementing PBIS struggle to implement effective interventions at Tiers 2 and 3. • Youth with “internalizing” issues may go undetected. • PBIS systems (although showing success in social climate and discipline) often do not address broader community data and mental health prevention.

  23. A more “mainstream” conversationMental Health • More awareness of the need to do more. • A recognition that schools have a role. • A need to increase access. • But outcomes are more than access. • Prevention, as well as access.

  24. The Context for Needed Partnerships : • One in 5 youth have a MH “condition”. • About 70% of those get no treatment. • School is “defacto” MH provider. • Juvenile Justice system is next level of system default. • Suicide is 4th leading cause of death among young adults. • Factors that impact mental health occur “round the clock”. • It is challenging for educators to address the factors beyond school. • It is challenging for community providers to address the factors in school.

  25. Innovations&Future Directions

  26. Tertiary Prevention: Specialized Individualized Systems for Students with High-Risk Behavior SCHOOL-WIDE POSITIVE BEHAVIOR INTERVENTIONS and SUPPORT 5% Secondary Prevention: Specialized Group Systems for Students with At-Risk Behavior 15% Primary Prevention: School-/Classroom- Wide Systems for All Students, Staff, & Settings 80% of Students

  27. MH/Community Partners Embedded within the System • Need to expand current continuum of interventions and data sources used. • Push forward with Innovations. • BUT…use the logic of Implementation Science and use Data…

  28. Connections and Partnerships • OSEP National PBIS Technical Assistance Center (pbis.org) • Center for School Mental Health (csmh.umaryland.edu) • NASDSE (ideapartnership.org) • National COP for SBH (sharedwork.org)

  29. Advancing Education Effectiveness: Interconnecting School Mental Health and School-Wide Positive Behavior Support Editors: Susan Barrett, Lucille Eberand Mark Weist

  30. Development of an Interconnected Systems Framework for School Mental Health • Access on the Center for School Mental Health or National PBIS websites: • http://csmh.umaryland.edu/Resources/ Reports/SMHPBISFramework.pdf • http://www.pbis.org/school/school_mental_health/interconnected_systems.aspx • Edited by: Susan Barrett and Lucille Eber, National PBIS Center Partners; and Mark Weist, University of South Carolina (and Senior Advisor to the University of Maryland, Center for School Mental Health)

  31. ISF Defined • Structure and process for education and mental health systems to interact in most effective and efficient way. • Guided by key stakeholders in education and mental health/community systems. • Who have the authority to reallocate resources, change role and function of staff, and change policy.

  32. ISF Defined • Tiered prevention logic. • Cross system problem solving teams. • Use of data to decide which evidence based practices to implement. • Progress monitoring for both fidelity and impact. • Active involvement by youth, families, and other school and community stakeholders.

  33. A MH counselor is housed in a school building 1 day a week to “see” students. MH person participates in teams at all 3 tiers. Traditional  Preferred

  34. No data to decide on or monitor interventions. MH person leads group or individual interventions based on data. Traditional  Preferred

  35. School personnel only attempting to “do mental health”. A blended team of school and community providers “divide and conquer” based on strengths of our team. Traditional  Preferred

  36. School Data  Community DataStudent and System Level Academic (Benchmark, GPA, Credit accrual etc) Discipline Attendance Climate/Perception Visits to Nurse, Social Worker, Counselor, etc. Screening from one view Community Demographics Food Pantry Visits Protective and Risk Factors Calls to crisis centers, hospital visits Screening at multiple views

  37. I feel connected to my school

  38. NYC-PBIS Promise Zone

  39. NYC PZ School Outcome Data All schools had improved attendance Data obtained from NYCDOE website

  40. NYC PZ School Outcome Data- ELA 60% of PZ schools increased the percentages of students at Levels 3&4 from 2011 and 2012 60% of PZ schools reduced the percentage of students at Level 1 from 2011 and 2012 80% of PZ schools reduced percentage of students at Level 2 from 2011 and 2012 NY State English Language Arts Exam Percentage of Students All Students In 3rd to 8th Grades Data obtained from NYCDOE website

  41. Promise Zone Student Outcome PZ STUDENTS WITH IMPROVED ATTENDANCE # DAYS GAINED Equivalent to 2.52 School Years Data obtained from ARIS N=109

  42. MH/Community Partners Embedded throughout the System (all Tiers) • Need to expand current continuum of interventions and data sources used to guide system design. • Be creative, be brave, push forward with innovations. • If the “rules’ don’t work, find ways to change them! • BUT….make careful choices based on data. • Partner to evaluate the practices that expand access and options.

  43. Where do specific “MH” Interventions Fit? That depends on the data of the school and community Examples of Expanded View of data: • Child welfare contacts • Violence rates • Incarceration rates • Deployed families • Homeless families • Unemployment spikes

  44. Tertiary Prevention: Specialized Individualized Systems for Students with High-Risk Behavior SCHOOL-WIDE POSITIVE BEHAVIOR INTERVENTIONS and SUPPORT 5% Secondary Prevention: Specialized Group Systems for Students with At-Risk Behavior 15% Primary Prevention: School-/Classroom- Wide Systems for All Students, Staff, & Settings 80% of Students

  45. Trauma • Death/loss of a loved one • Abuse/neglect • Car accident • Chronic poverty • Community violence • Bullying • Medical illness • Natural disaster “Trauma is a fact of life. It does not, however, have to be a life sentence.” — Peter A. Levine, Ph.D. Levine, P. (2012). In an unspoken voice: How the body releases trauma and restores goodness. Berkley, CA: North Atlantic Books.

  46. Complex Trauma Domains • Affect and Behavioral Regulation • Attention/Consciousness • Self-Perception • Relationships • Somatization • Systems of Meaning DeRosa, R., Habib, M., Pelcovitz, D., Rathus, J., Sonnenklar, J., Ford, J., Kaplan, S. (2005). SPARCS: Structured Psychotherapy for Adolescents Responding to Chronic Stress: A Trauma-Focused Guide. Great Neck, NY: North Shore-Long Island Jewish Health system, Inc.

  47. Facilitation Techniques for Instructional Groups • Psychoeducation • Skill based • Role-Play • Group Discussion • Games • Experiential Instruction • Teambuilding/Group Cohesion

  48. A Typical Group Instructional Session • Check-In • Practice from Last Session • Mindfulness Exercise • Session-specific Content and Activities • Example: Bottle about to Burst • Check-Out • Remind to Practice DeRosa, R., Habib, M., Pelcovitz, D., Rathus, J., Sonnenklar, J., Ford, J., Kaplan, S. (2005). SPARCS: Structured Psychotherapy for Adolescents Responding to Chronic Stress: A Trauma-Focused Guide. Great Neck, NY: North Shore-Long Island Jewish Health system, Inc.

  49. Schools and Mental Health: A True Collaboration • “Upper Tier 2” intervention. • We sit on the Tier 2 team. • School staff identify students. • School staff make initial contact with parents/guardians. • We screen and assess students. • Co-facilitate SPARCS groups.

  50. Remain Open to Thinking Differently About Systems About Data About Practices