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Reading and Responding Academic Terminology. Take notes on these terms – then save with your Article of the Week Packets. 1. c lose read. When you close read, you observe facts and details about the text.  focus on a particular passage, or on the text as a whole

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reading and responding academic terminology

Reading and Responding Academic Terminology

Take notes on these terms – then save with your Article of the Week Packets

1 c lose read
1. close read
  • When you close read, you observe facts and details about the text.
    •  focus on a particular passage, or on the text as a whole
    • aim may be to notice all striking features of the text, or…
    •  to notice only selected features of the text
    • (this is the first step before interpreting your observations)
2 annotation
2. annotation
  • "Annotating" means underlining or highlighting key words and phrases
    • anything that strikes you as surprising or significant, or…

that raises questions

                  • and…
    • making notes in the margins
3 author s purpose a k a author s intent
3. author’s purpose (a.k.a., author’s intent)
  • author’s reason for writing
              • Ask yourself…
  • What is the author attempting to achieve by writing?
4 claim
4. claim
  • something that the author is trying to

convince the reader of

5 citation to cite
5. citation/to cite
  • the act of quoting an authority on a subject
6 analysis to analyze
6. analysis/to analyze
  • to study something closely and carefully
  • to learn the nature and relationship of its parts

by a close and careful examination

7 explicit
7. explicit
  • clear and complete
  • leaving no doubt about the meaning
8 inference
8. inference
  • a conclusion or opinion that is formed because

of known facts or evidence in a text combined

with knowledge of past experiences

9 summary
9. summary
  • a brief statement of the most important

information in a piece of writing

10 audience
10. audience
  • Those people you are trying to reach with

your writing/speaking

11 genre
11. genre
  • the forms of expository prose used to convey a

body of information about a particular subject

12 t a g
12. T.A.G.

T.A.G.

  • Topic (or Title)

Don’t forget

  • Audience your T.A.G.
  • Genre

(T.A.G.your sources…

when writing in response to text)