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PreK ESE Teacher Meeting April 11, 2012 PowerPoint Presentation
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PreK ESE Teacher Meeting April 11, 2012

PreK ESE Teacher Meeting April 11, 2012

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PreK ESE Teacher Meeting April 11, 2012

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  1. PreK ESE Teacher Meeting April 11, 2012

  2. Welcome to Math…It’s More Than Counting

  3. Rules • Respect the speaker (limit sidebar conversations) • Participate • What is said here, stays here • What is learned here, leaves here The chime will be our attention signal.

  4. Celebrations

  5. Body Math Body math, body math… I can do body math with my nose I can do body math with my toes Count one hand, two hands – clap to the beat You can do body math with me

  6. Body Math I’ve got knees – two knees I’ve got shoulders – two shoulders I’ve got a bellybutton – one bellybutton I’ve got fingers – ten fingers I’ve got a body – one body I can shake, shake, shake, shake Shake it all around, yeah… shake it all around

  7. Body Math I can do body math with my nose I can do body math with my toes Count one hand, two hands – clap to the beat You can do body math with me

  8. Body Math I’ve got toes – ten toes I’ve got ears – two ears I’ve got eyes – two eyes I’ve got a mouth – one mouth I’ve got a body – one body I can shake, shake, shake, shake, shake it all around, yeah…shake it all around

  9. Body Math Shake it all around, Shake it, Shake it all around Yeah… Body math!

  10. For the Love of Goodness, Why… • Most of the brain is activated during physical activity • Movement activities provide opportunity to cross the body’s midline • Active Involvement helps children understand and learn new concepts • New vocabulary becomes much less abstract and more concrete when children experience the words • It’s fun!!!

  11. Research says… Because young children’s experiences fundamentally shape their attitude toward mathematics, an engaging and encouraging climate for children’s early encounters with mathematics is important. It is vital for young children to develop confidence in their ability to understand and use mathematics-in other words, to see mathematics as within their reach. (NAEYC and NCTM 2002)

  12. Learning Goal PreK ESE teachers will understand the math standards and be able to apply them in their classroom

  13. Alignment Between • Florida Voluntary Prekindergarten Education Standards (2008) • Florida Early Learning and Developmental Standards for Four-Year-Olds (2011) • Next Generation Sunshine State Standards (K) • Core Curriculum State Standards (K)

  14. Mathematical Thinking • Number Sense • Number and Operations • Patterns and Seriation • Geometry • Spatial Relations • Measurement

  15. Number Sense • Understand one-to-one correspondence • Count and construct sets • Compare quantities/determines if sets are equal, one has “more”, or one has “fewer” • Assign and relate numerals (written) and numbers (spoken) to a group of objects • Count and know sequence of numbers (spoken) • Understand and use ordinal positions

  16. Table Activity Take a look at the manipulatives on your table and discuss within your group how they can be used to teach/practice skills in the area of Number Sense. Use the Florida Early Learning and Developmental Standards as a reference. Be prepared to share. The chime will be our attention signal.

  17. Number and Operations • Understand there are more when combining sets of objects • Combine sets of objects to 10 (addition) • Understand there are fewer when removing objects from a set • Remove objects from a set no larger than 10 (subtraction) • Separate a set into parts (division)

  18. Table Activity Take a look at the manipulatives on your table and discuss within your group how they can be used to teach/practice skills in the area of Number and Operations. Use the Florida Early Learning and Developmental Standards as a reference. Be prepared to share. The chime will be our attention signal.

  19. Patterns and Seriation • Recognize patterns and non-patterns • Duplicate identical patterns (at least two elements/events such as clap/snap or red/blue) • Independently produce patterns with at least two elements • Sort, order, compare and describe objects according to characteristics or attributes • Order objects in a series (at least three objects)

  20. Table Activity Take a look at the manipulatives on your table and discuss within your group how they can be used to teach/practice skills in the area of Patterns and Seriation. Use the Florida Early Learning and Developmental Standards as a reference. Be prepared to share. The chime will be our attention signal.

  21. Geometry • Categorize/sort two-dimensional objects • Name two-dimensional objects • Construct example of two-dimensional shapes • Identify number of sides of two-dimensional shapes • Understand two-dimensional shapes are equivalent in different orientations (slide, flip, rotate)

  22. Geometry • Categorize/sort three-dimensional shapes • Name three-dimensional shapes • Analyze and construct examples of symmetry and non-symmetry in two dimensions, using concrete objects

  23. Table Activity Take a look at the manipulatives on your table and discuss within your group how they can be used to teach/practice skills in the area of Geometry. Use the Florida Early Learning and Developmental Standards as a reference. Be prepared to share. The chime will be our attention signal.

  24. Spatial Relations • Understand positional words (receptive) • Use positional terms verbally (expressive) • Describe relative position from different perspectives (I am… you are…) • Understand and can tell the difference between orientation terms (horizontal, diagonal, vertical) • Use directions to move through space and find places in space

  25. Table Activity Take a look at the manipulatives on your table and discuss within your group how they can be used to teach/practice skills in the area of Spatial Relations. Use the Florida Early Learning and Developmental Standards as a reference. Be prepared to share. The chime will be our attention signal.

  26. Measurement • Engage in activities that explore measurement • Compare quantities of length, weight and height using a non-standard reference • Use measurement vocabulary (length, weight, height) and comparative terminology (more, less, shorter, longer, heaviest, lightest)

  27. Measurement • Assist with collecting and sorting materials to be graphed • Work with teacher to help create/add to graph • Analyze information on graph/chart (with teacher assistance) • Predict the results of data collected (with teacher assistance)

  28. Table Activity Take a look at the manipulatives on your table and discuss within your group how they can be used to teach/practice skills in the area of Measurement. Use the Florida Early Learning and Developmental Standards as a reference. Be prepared to share. The chime will be our attention signal.

  29. Mathematical Thinking • Number Sense • Number and Operations • Patterns and Seriation • Geometry • Spatial Relations • Measurement

  30. More Than Counting One in the Bed on page 142 • Description • Materials • Appropriate Level • What to Look For/Notice • Modifications • Content Connections • Additional Processing Questions

  31. Table Activity • Working individually, or in a small group, look through the More Than Standards book and find at least three new activities in the area of mathematical thinking written at the top of the sheet on your table. You can use the post it notes to mark the activities in your book. • When you are done, list the activities and page number of each on the sheet. • Be prepared to share.

  32. Table Activity Number Sense Activity Page # • __________________ • __________________ • __________________

  33. Mathematical Thinking

  34. Additional Resources Florida VPK Teacher Tool Kit Florida’s Office of Early Learning Birth to 5 Standards Florida DOE Illinois State Board of Education

  35. VPK Teacher Toolkit http://www.flvpkonline.org/teachertoolkit/

  36. VPK Teacher Toolkit http://www.flvpkonline.org/teachertoolkit/

  37. EARLY LEARNING SERVICES - Birth to Five Standards www.flbt5.com

  38. Mathematics: VPK Resources Things to Do while You're Waiting: Mathhttp://illinoisearlylearning.org/tipsheets/mathactivities.pdf [Español][Polish] Tips for parents and teachers to use during transition times and other waiting times (e.g., standing in the checkout line at the grocery store). Examples for several different mathematic skill areas are included. More Detail Related Benchmarks: VI.A.a.5.a

  39. Things to Do while You’re Waiting: Math It’s happening again! You’re running errands with your children and suddenly you’re stuck—in traffic, at the clinic, in the checkout line. Many parents find that playful learning activities can help reduce children’s impatience when they have to wait. You can use waiting time to show your child that Math = Part of Life. Math is much more than just counting, adding, and subtracting! Playing with math concepts helps children become confident mathematical thinkers. Here are some quick math questions, games, and activities to engage a child who has to wait.

  40. Counting: Use objects to help your child learn that each item we count corresponds to a number. “Let’s put one can of beans on top of each cereal box.” Ask each other questions like “How many trucks do you see?” “How many people are ahead of us in line, and how many will there be once the front person leaves?” Children like action rhymes that involve counting. Sequences and patterns: Order is important in math. Notice sequences with your child: “Looks like we’re the second in line!” Find simple patterns together—the colors of floor tiles or the rhythms of people walking. Invite your child to make visual patterns using small objects around you. Classifying: This means sorting things according to different properties. Make a game of sorting objects with your child, such as coins or laundry. Or you might suggest, “Let’s find all the people with hats” or “I’ll spot red cars and you spot cars in your favorite color.”

  41. Spatial relations: This has to do with shapes and locations of objects. You can “hunt” for shapes together: squares, triangles, rectangles, and circles. Use words like “on,” “under,” and “inside” to describe where you see the shapes. Drawing shapes in the air can also be fun. Estimation and predictions: Children often like to make educated guesses. “Will our laundry fit in two washers?” “Which is higher, a stack of five pennies or five dimes?” “How can you tell?” Make a guess first, and then check to see how close your guess came. Measurement and time: Investigate measurement together. “How many hands tall is this jar?” “Which is heavier, your coat or your boot?” “How many steps to the car?” Your child may like timing games: “How many times can you count to 10 before we are first in line?” “How long can you stand on one leg?” For more tip sheets on other topics, please go to http://illinoisearlylearning.org

  42. Illinois Early Learning Project • The Path to Math: Beginning Numbers • The Path to Math: Classification • The Path to Math: Geometric Thinking for Young Children • The Path to Math: Measurement with Young Children • The Path to Math: More Numbers • The Path to Math: More Word Problems for Preschoolers • The Path to Math: Real Graphs for Preschoolers • The Path to Math: Word Problems for Preschoolers • Predicting: Helping PreschoolersLookAhead

  43. Fitting It In • Books, poems, songs and fingerplays provide an authentic context for patterns and relationships which can lead to meaningful discussions about math concepts • Post a number line and refer to it when counting throughout the day • When lining up use the words first, second, third… • Measure items using non-standard units of measure

  44. Fitting It In • Describe the path you are taking as you move from one point on campus to another • Have the children explain how they get from one place to another • Use spatial vocabulary when explaining where an object can be found or where to put it away • Use comparative language such as (short/shorter/shortest) • Graph whenever possible

  45. Learning Goal PreK ESE teachers will understand the math standards and be able to apply them in their classroom

  46. Celebrate Your Learning

  47. Reminder/PreK to K Transition • Children should be returning to their home school • Children should be in the general education classroom to the maximum extent appropriate • DD is not a label of disorder/disability but a label of delay • The longer a child stays in a self-contained class the larger the gap becomes

  48. Reminder/Data Collection Documentation is very important. The more detailed information you provide the more it will help the receiving school know each child’s needs and how to appropriately support the child in the general education class. It will also assist the school team (IEP/RtI) in the decision making process when looking at DD dismissal.