Romantic View of Nature - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

romantic view of nature n.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Romantic View of Nature PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Romantic View of Nature

play fullscreen
1 / 65
Romantic View of Nature
212 Views
Download Presentation
sissy
Download Presentation

Romantic View of Nature

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript

  1. Romantic View of Nature

  2. Romantic Encounters with Nature • Personification of Nature • Identification with Personified Nature • Elevation of Persona’s Spirit—Rebirth: feelings of youth • Perception of the Spiritual in Nature • Expansion of Persona’s Vision to a Larger Humanity

  3. Poetry: Romantic Theories • Wordsworth: “spontaneous overflow of powerful feelings”; “from emotion recollected in tranquillity” • Shelley: Poets “the unacknowledged legislators of the world” • Keats: “truth of Imagination”; “Beauty is truth, truth beauty”

  4. American Romantics: Emerson, Thoreau, Whitman • More direct connection with Nature: • Emerson: “transparent eyeball”; “Nature is the incarnation of thought” • Thoreau: “Am I not partly leaves and vegetable mould myself?” • Whitman: “My tongue, every atom of my blood, form’d from this soil, this air” • Identification without personification

  5. Romanticism and Landscape Pastoral, Picturesque, Sublime

  6. Poussin, Arcadian Shepherds (1638-39)

  7. Stowe: Temple of Ancient Virtue

  8. English Landscape Tradition • Edmund Burke, Philosophical Inquiry into the Origins of Our Ideas of the Sublime and the Beautiful (1757-59) • William Gilpin, Three Essays on Picturesque Beauty (1794) • Uvedale Price, Essay on the Picturesque (1794)

  9. Edmund Burke • The Sublime • gives people harsh and antisocial feelings of “agreeable horror” • associated with things or experiences that are powerful, threatening, vast or unclear • generally associated with masculine qualities • associated with representations rather than direct experience

  10. Edmund Burke • The Beautiful • the beautiful gives people harmonious and sociable feelings. • associated with things that are small, weak, soft, pastel-colored, or sensually curved • generally associated with feminine qualities.

  11. The Picturesque: Gilpin • Roughness/ruggedness • Subjects: Examples of picturesque • Ruined architecture • Disheveled hair • Patriarchal head • Human body, esp. in action • Animals: worn-out carthorse, cow, goat, ass, colors on birds • Smooth stallion is beautiful

  12. Picturesque: Gilpin, cont. • Examples (cont.): • lakes • Execution: free and bold • Composition: variety of parts united • Shapes • Light and shadow • Color • Cause: indeterminate

  13. The Picturesque: Price • Roughness, sudden variation (4) • Associated with ruins, not with “the highest order of created beings” (8) • Examples: • Gothic architecture • Hovels, mills, insides of old barns, stables, etc. • “limbs of huge trees shattered by lightning or tempestuous winds” (6) • Animals: Ass, sheep, deer, lion (more than lioness) ruffled birds (6-8) • People: gypsies and beggars (8)

  14. Constable, Wivenhoe Park, Essex (1816)

  15. Constable, The Haywain, 1821

  16. Thomas Cole, The Oxbow (1836)

  17. Turner

  18. Turner, The Slave Ship, 1840

  19. Friedrich

  20. Earlier 19th C. American Literature and Painting The American Landscape

  21. Cole, The Oxbow (1836)

  22. American Landscape Painting • In the U.S. before 1820, landscape painting was considered inferior to history painting and portraiture. • Landscape paintings were informational views of estates or cities: they were not considered great art.

  23. Benjamin West, Death of General Wolfe (1770)

  24. Gilbert Stuart, George Washington (1795)

  25. Francis Guy, Pennington Mills, Jones Falls, Baltimore, View Upstream (c. 1804)

  26. American Landscape Painting • However, between the 1820s and the Civil War, landscape painting became the most important genre of American painting—the genre most associated with American identity. • Thomas Cole was largely responsible for this change.

  27. Thomas Cole (1801-1845) • Born in England • Moved to U.S. in 1818 • Largely self-taught • First member of the “Hudson River School” of painting

  28. Cole’s Landscapes • Emphasize the grandeur and wildness of the American landscape • Apply the European concepts of the sublime and the beautiful to the American landscape • Balance the powers of nature with the powers of civilization

  29. Cole, Falls of Kaaterskill (1826)

  30. Cole, View of Schroon Mountain (1838)

  31. European Landscape Tradition • The Beautiful: associated with classical ideas of order, clarity, and harmony • The Sublime: associated with horror, pain, danger, lack of clarity, disharmony

  32. Claude Lorraine, Landscape with Dancing Figures (1648)

  33. Salvator Rosa, Bandits on a Rocky Coast (17th C.)

  34. Cole, The Oxbow (1836)

  35. Cole, The Oxbow (1836)

  36. Cole, View on the Catskill, Early Autumn (1837)

  37. Cole, River in the Catskills (1843)

  38. George Inness, The Lackawanna Valley (c. 1856)

  39. Transcendentalism and Luminism

  40. Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882)