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Using Technology to Enhance Co-Teaching PowerPoint Presentation
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Using Technology to Enhance Co-Teaching

Using Technology to Enhance Co-Teaching

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Using Technology to Enhance Co-Teaching

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  1. Using Technology to Enhance Co-Teaching Sara Elburn, M.S. Ron Siers, ABD Stacie Siers, M.Ed. Salisbury University

  2. Turning Point: I have … Used it. This is my first time.

  3. Wikis: I have … Used them. Seen them. Huh?

  4. Who, where, why… • A Bit about Us • Workshops for PDS Mentors • Research on Collaborative Internships

  5. Our Shared Vision • Your Challenge: Turning possibility thinking into an inspired vision that is shared with your intern or mentor. • Be forward-looking and look across the “horizon of time” and imagine the great opportunities to come with technology (Kouzes & Posner, 2007). • The image may be vague from a distance, but IMAGINE that the extraordinary is possible and the ordinary can be transformed into something wonderful & noble (Kouzes & Posner, 2007). • Imagine the possibilities • Find a common purpose

  6. Millennial Expectations & Technology (Carter, 2008) • Millennial Generation – 1982 – 2002 (76 million) (Interns) • Generation X - 1961 – 1981 (Small Cohort) (Mentors) • Boom Generation - 1943 – 1960 (80 million) (Mentors) • Traditionalist Generation – 1925 – 1942

  7. Millennial Interaction with Multiple Technological Resources • Unfamiliar with life before networking technologies. Consider themselves to be technologically savvy (Carter, 2005) • No experience with life before cell phones, instant messaging, Internet applications, Blackberries, Palm technologies, IPods, & handheld technologies (Howe & Strauss 2000; Raines, 2003, Carter, 2005) • Learning occurs through social collaboration • Social networking & Social negotiation are the norm (Howe & Strauss, 2000)

  8. Exhaustive Description of a Supportive Mentor: Collaborative Internship Experience In a supportive collaborative internship experience, the mentor’s existential presence is perceived by the intern as more than just a physical presence. There is the aspect of the mentor giving of oneself to the intern. This giving of oneself may be in response to the intern’s request, but it is more often a voluntary effort and is unsolicited by the intern. The mentor’s willingness to give of oneself is primarily perceived by the intern as an attitude and behavior of consultation and really listening and responding to the unique concerns of the individual intern as a person of value. The mentor’s ability to model enthusiasm and passion for teaching and learning along with collaboratively planning lessons foster the intern’s teaching efficacy. The mentor provides the intern with enough personal space to understand their teaching self. The direct result of the mentor’s existential presence and caring disposition is a co-teaching relationship where both members view each other as teammates for the benefit of their students. THERE CARE + =

  9. Collaborative Voices "The strength of co-teaching comes from the many opportunities to use innovative practices that would be far less practical in a classroom with one teacher." - Marilyn Friend, 2007 "Teachers (81%) in co-taught classrooms were more likely to provide instruction that involved students in higher dimensions of learning." - James M. Walsh & Barbara Jones, 2004 "Coming up with differentiated and motivating lessons is much easier with two people. Two teachers means that two people can figure out how to "shake up" the lesson and ensure maximum student engagement." - Wendy W. Murawski & Lisa Dicker, 2008

  10. Keep in mind… • Meaningful use • Mentors are models • Intern anxiety

  11. Exhaustive Description of a Supportive Mentor: Collaborative Internship Experience In a supportive collaborative internship experience, the mentor’s existential presence is perceived by the intern as more than just a physical presence. There is the aspect of the mentor giving of oneselfto the intern. This giving of oneself may be in response to the intern’s request, but it is more often a voluntary effort and is unsolicited by the intern. The mentor’s willingness to give of oneself is primarily perceived by the intern as an attitude and behavior of consultation and really listening and responding to the unique concerns of the individual intern as a person of value. The mentor’s ability to model enthusiasm and passion for teaching and learning along with collaboratively planning lessons foster the intern’s teaching efficacy. The mentor provides the intern with enough personal space to understand their teaching self. The direct result of the mentor’s existential presence and caring disposition is a co-teaching relationship where both members view each other as teammates for the benefit of their students.

  12. Google Calendar: I have … Used it. Seen it. Huh?

  13. Twitter: I have … Used it. Seen it. Huh?

  14. Delicious: I have … Used it. Seen it. Huh?

  15. Exhaustive Description of a Supportive Mentor: Collaborative Internship Experience In a supportive collaborative internship experience, the mentor’s existential presence is perceived by the intern as more than just a physical presence. There is the aspect of the mentor giving of oneself to the intern. This giving of oneself may be in response to the intern’s request, but it is more often a voluntary effort and is unsolicited by the intern. The mentor’s willingness to give of oneself is primarily perceived by the intern as an attitude and behavior of consultationand really listening and responding to the unique concerns of the individual intern as a person of value. The mentor’s ability to model enthusiasm and passion for teaching and learning along with collaboratively planning lessons foster the intern’s teaching efficacy. The mentor provides the intern with enough personal space to understand their teaching self. The direct result of the mentor’s existential presence and caring disposition is a co-teaching relationship where both members view each other as teammates for the benefit of their students.

  16. Internet Treasure Hunts: I have … Used them. Seen them. Huh?

  17. Digital Stories: I have … Created them. Seen them. Huh?

  18. Wordle: I have … Used it. Seen it. Huh?

  19. Webspiration: I have … Used it. Seen it. Huh?

  20. StudyStack: I have … Used it. Seen it. Huh?

  21. Imagination Cubed: I have… • Used it. • Seen it. • Huh?

  22. Voki: I have… • Used it. • Seen it. • Huh?

  23. Blabberize: I have … Used it. Seen it. Huh?

  24. Glogster: I have … Used it. Seen it. Huh?

  25. VoiceThread: I have … Used it. Seen it. Huh?

  26. Exhaustive Description of a Supportive Mentor: Collaborative Internship Experience In a supportive collaborative internship experience, the mentor’s existential presence is perceived by the intern as more than just a physical presence. There is the aspect of the mentor giving of oneself to the intern. This giving of oneself may be in response to the intern’s request, but it is more often a voluntary effort and is unsolicited by the intern. The mentor’s willingness to give of oneself is primarily perceived by the intern as an attitude and behavior of consultation and really listening and responding to the unique concerns of the individual intern as a person of value. The mentor’s ability to model enthusiasm and passion for teaching and learning along with collaboratively planning lessonsfoster the intern’s teaching efficacy. The mentor provides the intern with enough personal space to understand their teaching self. The direct result of the mentor’s existential presence and caring disposition is a co-teaching relationship where both members view each other as teammates for the benefit of their students.

  27. Google Docs: I have … Used it. Seen it. Huh?

  28. Exhaustive Description of a Supportive Mentor: Collaborative Internship Experience In a supportive collaborative internship experience, the mentor’s existential presence is perceived by the intern as more than just a physical presence. There is the aspect of the mentor giving of oneself to the intern. This giving of oneself may be in response to the intern’s request, but it is more often a voluntary effort and is unsolicited by the intern. The mentor’s willingness to give of oneself is primarily perceived by the intern as an attitude and behavior of consultation and really listening and responding to the unique concerns of the individual intern as a person of value. The mentor’s ability to model enthusiasm and passion for teaching and learning along with collaboratively planning lessons foster the intern’s teaching efficacy. The mentor provides the intern with enough personal space to understand their teaching self. The direct result of the mentor’s existential presence and caring disposition is a co-teaching relationship where both members view each other as teammates for the benefit of their students.

  29. Exhaustive Description of a Supportive Mentor: Collaborative Internship Experience In a supportive collaborative internship experience, the mentor’s existential presence is perceived by the intern as more than just a physical presence. There is the aspect of the mentor giving of oneself to the intern. This giving of oneself may be in response to the intern’s request, but it is more often a voluntary effort and is unsolicited by the intern. The mentor’s willingness to give of oneself is primarily perceived by the intern as an attitude and behavior of consultation and really listening and responding to the unique concerns of the individual intern as a person of value. The mentor’s ability to model enthusiasm and passion for teaching and learning along with collaboratively planning lessons foster the intern’s teaching efficacy. The mentor provides the intern with enough personal spaceto understand their teaching self. The direct result of the mentor’s existential presence and caring disposition is a co-teaching relationship where both members view each other as teammates for the benefit of their students.

  30. TTP: Teammate Technological Pedagogy • Tech goal • Early tech check • Management • Reassure • Plan B

  31. Ron Siers rrsiers@salisbury.edu Sara Elburn sjelburn@salisbury.edu Contact Information Visit our Wiki: http://rrsiers.wikispaces.com/MdPDS