slide1 n.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Mating Systems in Birds Monogamy (> 90% of all birds) Polygamy (~2% of birds) Promiscuity (~6% of birds) Although PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Mating Systems in Birds Monogamy (> 90% of all birds) Polygamy (~2% of birds) Promiscuity (~6% of birds) Although

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 11

Mating Systems in Birds Monogamy (> 90% of all birds) Polygamy (~2% of birds) Promiscuity (~6% of birds) Although - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 380 Views
  • Uploaded on

Mating Systems in Birds Monogamy (> 90% of all birds) Polygamy (~2% of birds) Promiscuity (~6% of birds) Although most birds are ‘monogamous’, DNA fingerprinting and other methods show surprising results. EPCs: extra-pair Copulations Advantage of EPCs obvious for males

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

Mating Systems in Birds Monogamy (> 90% of all birds) Polygamy (~2% of birds) Promiscuity (~6% of birds) Although


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
    Presentation Transcript
    1. Mating Systems in Birds Monogamy (> 90% of all birds) Polygamy (~2% of birds) Promiscuity (~6% of birds) Although most birds are ‘monogamous’, DNA fingerprinting and other methods show surprising results

    2. EPCs: extra-pair Copulations Advantage of EPCs obvious for males For females, may hedge against infertile mates or help maximize genetic diversity of offspring Result is a parent or parents raising offspring not their own

    3. Some species have intraspecific brood parasitism… buffalodreaming.com Cliff Swallow colony

    4. latimesblogs.latimes.com Females carry eggs to other nests Males guard nests to prevent egg dumping, but also visit other nests to destroy eggs Results in up to 43% of nests in a colony with chicks not related to adult pair at nest

    5. For cliff swallows, this behavior exists because nest parasites will fledge more chicks than non-parasites, thus have greater reproductive success This is true for EPCs as well. Although birds are mostly monogamous, it is not strict monogamy and there are selective reasons for these behaviors Molecular studies in 1990s to recent have shown how prevalent this behavior is among birds as well

    6. Polygamy -- polygyny, or one male and many females -- polyandry, or one female and many males -- can occur only if both parents not needed to successfully raise offspring -- polygyny most common in marsh habitats -- of 14 polygynous spp. in North America, 11 are in marsh habitats

    7. Red-winged Blackbird -- marshes are relatively safe from predators -- lots of food, but patchy -- males with territories in high-quality patches can support more females and offspring

    8. Polygyny begins with female choice: Choose poor patch with one male, or share good patch with one male and another female? Polygyny Threshold Model RS

    9. Despite polygyny, still lots of EPCs in Red-winged Blackbirds

    10. Polyandry much rarer in birds (< 1% of species) -- Spotted Sandpiper and other shorebirds -- Female maximizes reproductive success -- Lays one clutch with one male, he incubates and raises young while she lays another clutch with a new male -- may do this up to four times and she takes care of last clutch

    11. Promiscuity in ~6% of birds Sage Grouse and Leks -- male uses cervical air sacs in neck during display -- females choose males, then leaves to raise young on her own