nurturing vs nature for biology distance learning class
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Nurturing Vs Nature For Biology - Distance Learning Class. By: Joy Kerr. Project Goals. Determine if nurturing has an affect on Behavior Relationship Size. Golden Hamster. Syrian Golden Hamster Order : Rodents (Rodential) Suborder : Mouse relatives (Myomorpha)

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Presentation Transcript
project goals
Project Goals

Determine if nurturing has an affect on

  • Behavior
  • Relationship
  • Size
golden hamster
Golden Hamster
  • Syrian Golden Hamster
  • Order: Rodents (Rodential)
  • Suborder: Mouse relatives (Myomorpha)
  • Family (burrowers (Cricetidae
  • Genus: Hamster (Mesocricetus
information
Information
  • Hamsters are territorial, nocturnal, prairie animals
  • Life expectancy is usually two to four years
  • Pregnancy lasts 16 to 17 days
description
Description

Two hamsters were used for the project

  • Siblings - Female
  • Age- three weeks old
  • Subject A - schedule involved interaction with humans on a regular basis
  • Subject B - only interaction with humans was based on necessity

For a list of daily activities - See Exhibit A

FOR MORE INFO...

comparative analysis
Comparative Analysis

Subject A

Subject B

Behavior Relationship Intelligence

Size Activity level

measurement
Measurement
  • A scale was used to measure weight
  • Research was conducted to determine usual behavior expected from hamsters
  • A log was kept to record changes or unusual behavior
  • Different activities were recorded to determine intelligence
procedures
Procedures
  • Two sister hamster were purchased at 3 weeks old
  • The hamsters were separated immediately
  • Each house contained food, water, exercise wheel, and a play toy
  • Bedding consisted of shredded pine
schedule
Schedule
  • Subject A received human interaction on a regular schedule
  • Subject A exercise scheduled consisted of running around in a ball for 20 minutes three times each day
  • Subject A received special treats - cheerios, dog biscuits
schedule10
Schedule
  • Subject B received attention only during house cleaning
  • Subject B exercise scheduled consisted of running around in a ball for 20 minutes two times per week.
  • Subject B did not receive additional food items
schedule11
Schedule
  • Each subject received the same amount per feeding
  • Each subject received fresh water per day
  • Each subject’s house was cleaned twice a week - Wednesday and Saturday evenings
measuring intelligence
Measuring Intelligence

Intelligence was measured on a scale 1-5.

Example: It took Subject B one day to learn to use the potty house; it took Subject A five days to learn to use the potty house.

comparative results
Comparative Results
  • Based on the project - nurturing made a difference when comparing activities between Subject A and Subject B.
  • Based on the project - nurturing did not affect size or intelligence, or relationship with other hamsters.
exhibit a
Exhibit A
  • List of daily activities for Subject A.
    • Being held
    • Talking (human interaction)
    • Running in a ball
    • Eating (introduced a new snack each day)
    • Sleeping 8:00 A.M - 7:00 P.M.
exhibit a continued
Exhibit A Continued
  • List of daily activities for Subject B.
    • Limited voice interaction
    • Exercise on wheel only
    • Exercise outside of cage twice/week
    • Eating regular food only
    • Sleeping 7:00 A.M - 11:00 P.M.
subject a and subject b
Subject A and Subject B

Abbey

Rainey (in the ball)

the end

The End

By: Joy G. Kerr

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